#11  
Old 06-15-2006, 03:30 AM
CanuckJim's Avatar
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Marcel,

So, you stopped blushing. Nice photos and fine work. For bread, you'll need the door. Might be better to make it in two pieces, separated by an air space, to keep it a bit cooler. Consider a draft door as well.

Cheers,
Jim
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  #12  
Old 06-15-2006, 11:10 AM
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Default Draft Door

I have taken a stab at the draft door. It looks like Jim used a piece of scrap metal. Have an old car door laying around? Or maybe it was just beat up from the high heat.

The draft door is similar to your Weberģ grill where you choke down the fire but not snuff it out. It reduces the inlet size to a hole about 80% your door width and about 2 to 3 inches in height. You still need to vent the burnt gases so it is tilted into the flue. Thus it helps if your "tunnel" to the oven proper was built square. Don't worry if it is not as this is not a "snug" fit. I don't remember if CanuckJim's had a handle on it - I donít think it did as I remember it clanging down to the ground and a sharp warning that it was Hot - yeah you could see the tempering that it underwent. It could be fit with a handle but you would need to isolate it, as best as possible, from the surrounding metal.

Attached are a few drawings of what was fabricated.

This post, as of 15JUN05 1225 N.Am. west coast time, is duplicated at
http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/show...=3619#post3619
Attached Thumbnails
Marcel's Pompeii Oven photos Part 7 Roof-side1.jpg   Marcel's Pompeii Oven photos Part 7 Roof-front1.jpg   Marcel's Pompeii Oven photos Part 7 Roof-handle2.jpg  

Last edited by jengineer; 06-15-2006 at 12:25 PM.
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  #13  
Old 06-15-2006, 12:08 PM
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Nice.

Patrick, can you post the door drawings to the Pompeii Oven section, and stick the thread there? Call it Oven Door Design.

This should be a good permanent posting for folks who build their own dome (the Forno Bravo Ovens all have a door).

James
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  #14  
Old 06-15-2006, 09:12 PM
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Default my own ocean.

Building good arches is hard. My stone arch has been put up and torn down three times so far. I keep finding the perfect natural voussoirs in the riverbed I've been taxing. It'll be a sight to behold when it's done though, mark my words. As far as brick arches go, I've had a bit of an idea.. First off, let me just say that I hate bricks. Well, I hate the look of new brick. I decided to get a rock from every surf spot I frequent to include in my oven, and whilst at sunset, I ffound a bunch of bricks which were battered over time by the ocean, and had awesome rounded edges. This got me thinkin'. "Hey, I could simulate the ocean in my cement mixer." (I've excluded the expletives) So I got myself a brick hammer, cur the rough shapes I wanted for a brick arch and bunged them all in the mixer with some sand and water for a day, and bobs your uncle, cool looking arch bricks.
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  #15  
Old 06-16-2006, 03:50 AM
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Default Draft Door

JE, James,

My draft door used to have a very handsome handle, and a wooden backing, but I neglected to isolate them properly, and they were incinerated. These things get HOT. For the metal, I went to Home Depot and got a small sheet of galvanized roofing metal, cut it and bent it to size. JE's right, it doesn't have to be a snug fit, just enough blockage to control the draft. My draft door has a lower opening of and inch and a half. Other ovens might require more. It would be an idea to make the door out of a single sheet, then add bent, adjustable legs so the vent size can be varied until the proper opening is determined.

In place, the draft door makes my chimney huff like the proverbial locomotive on steroids. The heat of the fire is drastically increased and burn times are shortened. The draft door is particularly useful in winter, when quick, high heat is required.

Nice drawings, JE, and suitable commentary. Do NOT give up your day job !

Jim
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  #16  
Old 06-17-2006, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbricknick
So I got myself a brick hammer, cur the rough shapes I wanted for a brick arch and bunged them all in the mixer with some sand and water for a day, and bobs your uncle, cool looking arch bricks.
Can you post some pics of your bricks?
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  #17  
Old 06-19-2006, 10:51 PM
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been away for a while...the oven looks great, marcel!
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