#11  
Old 10-04-2005, 12:08 PM
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Tarik,

Once you taste the product from your oven the gaps will mean nothing. It is true, however with my oven as well, that if I had done more research I would build it differently. Mostly for asthetics(sp). The oven would still yield great results. This just makes me want to build another...but I value my life.(a message from my other half)...keep building and start cooking.
Looking foward to your pics.

Enjoy,

Bob C
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  #12  
Old 10-04-2005, 12:18 PM
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Thanks, Bob. We're looking forward to being able to cook in the oven. I posted a few pics of the oven in progress (finished dome pics are still in the camera) in the Sharing my progress thread.

Regards!
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  #13  
Old 10-04-2005, 05:33 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Vent Options

Marcel
Your progress looks great.

I have been working on the vent/chimney options as well. I have done some informal experimenting since the metal fabricators in my area qouted me $200-$300 to fab the metal chimeny vent
I used the 9X13 clay flue pipe supported by angle iron layed across the firebrick opening. Made several fires, worked good. (me thinking)If one was good maybe two would be better, they are only $12. Stacked side by side across the opening they work great. Only very small loss of smoke in front.
It might not be what your looking for but it works great and the price is right.

I have made pizza twice in the oven Wow what a difference the high heat and slight hint of smoke make.

Good luck
Mike
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  #14  
Old 10-04-2005, 06:08 PM
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Default Big Bubbles Beat Balloons Badly

# 45

Mike wrote:

"Marcel
Your progress looks great.

I have been working on the vent/chimney options as well. I have done some informal experimenting since the metal fabricators in my area qouted me $200-$300 to fab the metal chimeny vent
I used the 9X13 clay flue pipe supported by angle iron layed across the firebrick opening. Made several fires, worked good. (me thinking)If one was good maybe two would be better, they are only $12. Stacked side by side across the opening they work great. Only very small loss of smoke in front.
It might not be what your looking for but it works great and the price is right.

I have made pizza twice in the oven Wow what a difference the high heat and slight hint of smoke make.

Good luck
Mike"

================================================== ====

(M) Mike, would flat iron instead of angle iron also work?

(M) Your post reads like your smoke passes through a layer of many angle irons each of which has a gap. Is that what you mean? ___

(M) I have been considering 2 more pieces of about 24" - 29" flat iron to either support clay liners, or a chimney I'd build out of bricks; what kind I'll have to check with Mary. I assume that the heat of the smoke is not too intense to jeoparize the integrity of red brick, or ? ____
================================================== ====

(M) I tried using Bubble Wrap in addition to the balloons. The bubble wrap is far more durable and doesn't lose air as the balloons do over night. Even bubble wrap is stop gap. Had I cut my veins properly , ...... I would have committed suicide,

(M) Thanks for your support.

Ciao,

Marcel
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  #15  
Old 10-05-2005, 07:22 AM
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Marcel

I used two 24" long angle. Layed across the vent landing area. Spaced ~ 9" apart. The flue sections are set on top of this. I used angle for the vertical support as well as horizontal. Maybe some pictures with show what I am unable to describe.

Mike
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Marcel's Pompeii Oven photos Part 4-front.jpg  
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  #16  
Old 10-05-2005, 07:23 AM
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and another
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  #17  
Old 10-05-2005, 08:23 AM
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What about this. It is one of the two vent pieces that comes with the Casa ovens. You could readily use it for a Pompeii vent.
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Marcel's Pompeii Oven photos Part 4-vent_640.jpg  
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  #18  
Old 10-05-2005, 08:43 AM
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James, how much is that vent piece? I've got a great vent hole in an archway, just haven't quite worked out the vent transition to the clay chimney pipe.

Also, Mike, where did you find your columns? That's exactly what we have in mind for our oven, including 3 columns in front of the cement blocks under the oven.

Regards,
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  #19  
Old 10-05-2005, 09:13 AM
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Default How important is the area devoted to the chimney?

Quote:
Originally Posted by svtlightning
Marcel

I used two 24" long angle. Layed across the vent landing area. Spaced ~ 9" apart. The flue sections are set on top of this. I used angle for the vertical support as well as horizontal. Maybe some pictures with show what I am unable to describe.

Mike
#46

(M) Thanks, Mike. Your explanations were clear although I didn't actually see the vertical supports. Now, a few questions for anyone:

1- Mike used 2 large clay flue sections. I am concerned that such a large area may give up the dome heat too quickly. Does anyone know the relationship between the size of the vent opening and the effiiciency of the oven? ___ I'm sure there is a point of diminishing returns at both the large and small end of the scale but is anyone aware of a "scientific" or statistical study, such as the one that dictates about 60% of the dome height for the door height? _____

2- I am gravitating away from clay liners since they force a specific size and shape of the flue. Instead, I am thinking of using brick, perhaps the red kind with holes in which I could insert re-bar. Comments? ____

3- If I use brick, I wonder if an insulting brick would help prevent a wicking away of the dome heat? ____

4- If I can't find insulating bricks, would red clay bricks (*not* concrete) be better, or should I use my existing over-buy of the same thermal bricks as used on the hearth floor. Perhaps Jim Hatch could address this? ___

================================================== =

(M) I layed a couple of courses yesterday and probably have about 4 -5 more to do. I had to stop because my mason's sand had gotten wet. I find it much easier to mix refractory mortar ingredients dry before adding water.

Ciao,

Marcel
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  #20  
Old 10-05-2005, 12:46 PM
Peasant
 
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Tarik
You might laugh, but those columns a wedding cake separators. I got them at a yard sale. They are plastic, but have not been damaged by the heat thru 3 full burns. I will be making some larger ones to finish my dome facade.
I'm trying for a peripteros temple look.

Mike
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