#21  
Old 11-03-2006, 08:01 AM
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Lightbulb Beach Ball reconsidered

Quote:
Originally Posted by redbricknick

"So. I'm at the point where I have to tackle the dome. I have a few considerations with regards to method. <snip> What of the wire method? I can't find the thread that post is in. "

<snip>

So many questions. This is an invaluable forum, and I thank everyone profusely.
(M) Consider at least visiting the following URL in this forum:

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/show...ght=beach+ball (dome construction)

(M) While I had popping problems using several balloons to support the last few courses, I would have used this builder's beach ball method if I had access to one very large beach ball.

(M) If you leave the ball's valve stem accessible from the throat of your oven, you should be able to easily deflate it after your dome has dried for a few days; if not, popping the beach ball is always an option.

==========

(M) As to the "wire" method, I would consider using a fishing tackle swiveling screw eye and a stick or dowel cut to the interior radius of your circular footprint. If you use a plastic anchor for the swivel and place it dead center for that radius, you should later be able to fill that tiny gap with your leveling sand. Even if you simply unscrewed it, the remaining "hole" would be so small as to be a non-issue.

Ciao,

Marcel
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Last edited by Marcel; 11-03-2006 at 08:03 AM. Reason: I wrote diameter when it should have been "radius".
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  #22  
Old 11-03-2006, 08:29 AM
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Thumbs up Beach ball fotos phound!

(M) I was able to trace back the location of Davy's images on PhotoBucket.

(M) Clicking the following URL let me see an entire documentation of his oven building process:

http://s74.photobucket.com/albums/i242/abpo/

(M) To the "editors" of the new .pdf file for oven building instructions - directions, I submit that including such innovations as Davy used would greatly enhance the choice of oven builders to employ other options for their unique problems.

(M) Here next follow a few images I copied from Davy's PhotoBucket site:







Ciao,

Marcel
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  #23  
Old 11-03-2006, 08:38 AM
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Default Beach ball fotos 2nd try

(M) I don't know why the images didn't show up as I have done nothing different that I can tell from my usual Cop-Paste of the



I see, above, the "tag" but in the previous post I saw neither "tag" nor image!

Let me try 2 more. If nothing shows, then you can simply go to Davy's PhotoBucket URL at http://s74.photobucket.com/albums/i242/abpo/



(M) Trying a different approach:

<a href="http://photobucket.com/" target="_blank"><img src="http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i242/abpo/Gcourse10.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting"></a>



(M) Everything shows as I pasted it, so I hope you'll see some images.



Ciao,

Marcel
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Last edited by Marcel; 11-03-2006 at 09:37 AM. Reason: Still trying to include an image
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  #24  
Old 11-04-2006, 12:55 PM
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Default arch brick cuts

I'm really trying to go with the arch method for my oven opening, but my 10 inch brick saw isn't being friendly with me on the arch brick cuts. If I cut my bricks in half lengthways, I get 2 and a quarter inch thick bricks, and can then fit them through the saw to cut them into arch bricks, but I'm unsure of their rigidity at that decreased thickness. I'm trying to build an entryway and vent similar to Paulages' oven.
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  #25  
Old 11-04-2006, 01:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbricknick
I'm trying to build an entryway and vent similar to Paulages' oven.
Paulages bought tapered arch bricks from Harbison-Walker. I went to their local branch here in Jersey and was underwhelmed. They didn't have refractory tiles, or tapered brick in stock, and their price for insulating board was through the roof. I bought my 2 1/2" insblock-19 from another retailer (H-W manufactures it) for a fraction of their price.

Sawing long arch sections is hard. Consider piecing them sideways, with pieces cut from splits on alternating ends, so you are cutting the easy width of the brick.
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  #26  
Old 11-04-2006, 01:57 PM
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If I get what you mean, you are suggesting I cement pieces together to make regular thickness arch bricks from splits. Would these frankensteined' bricks bear a decent load? I guess if I laid them up over a form, each split section would rest against the next, essentially making a few thin arches next to eachother to form the big arch.
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  #27  
Old 11-05-2006, 04:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbricknick
If I get what you mean, you are suggesting I cement pieces together to make regular thickness arch bricks from splits. Would these frankensteined' bricks bear a decent load? I guess if I laid them up over a form, each split section would rest against the next, essentially making a few thin arches next to eachother to form the big arch.
That's it: Here's a picture of what I mean:



The arch sections would alternate through the use of a split front and back. I've omited three center bricks to have less lines to trim. This particular arch is designed to have something flat (like the end of a piece of refractory flue tile) sit on top of it, but you could easily use the same plan to make an arch top too. It's also designed to make both a short and tall piece out of a single firebrick (whole firebrick shown for comparison).

It'd be as strong as the mortar you put it together with.
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  #28  
Old 11-05-2006, 11:59 AM
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Thankyou so much dmun. I'm going to knock up a mock up from cardboard. and see how she sails.. My initial concern is getting away from traditional keystone arch construction. The feeling of knocking in my stone arch keystone without mortar and knowing it would stand like that forever was a good one, but also a total pain. If you are confident this design would stand with just mortar holding it up, I think I'd be willing to give it a go. (is there a high temp high strength refractory glue I could use in liue of mortar?) It's like lego. But lego which will provide my friends with pizza.
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  #29  
Old 11-05-2006, 07:07 PM
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Default layers

Being that this is brick oven photos, and I haven't posted any in a while, here you go. Our hearth layer cake is six odd reinforced inches of premix mortar with splashes of fortimax, one and a half inches of calcium cilicate board, glued directly to the cement with cal sil fibrous adhesive, a layer of offcut refractory floor tiles for thermal mass, then tomorrow, fireclay, sand and a full (10"by10"by2") refractory tile cooking surface. The refractory cement you see in the front is in lieu of tile offcuts on the outer rim of the dome layout.
Is there a way I can Macguyver a thermocouple into the hearth somehow then connect it to a digital readout later? I'd rather not dig up my hearth later, and if there is someway I can rig something myself.. Isn't it just some wires?
Attached Thumbnails
Golden Hammer Oven.-exsmalr.jpg  

Last edited by redbricknick; 11-05-2006 at 11:28 PM.
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  #30  
Old 11-06-2006, 01:40 AM
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Redbricknick:



Thermocouple installation is not a difficult thing to do.

You just could buy the thermocouple wire and make you own type length.

If you like, please search in this forum by thermocouples or by my name and you could obtain the most of the information that you are looking for.

I could answer you if any doubts still are there.



Luis
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