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  #21  
Old 04-18-2011, 05:14 AM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Very nice.
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  #22  
Old 04-18-2011, 01:28 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Great Job! both on the Building and documentation! keep up the good work.

Steve
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  #23  
Old 04-18-2011, 04:07 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

After a couple of fires you can see exactly where the smoke goes by the black marks. It pretty much all comes under the inner arch and stays close to the back wall of the vent. I had considered cutting a channel into the side walls of the vent to catch any smoke that might wander out that way but decided it probably wasn’t worth the extra work. I’m glad I didn’t.




And you can see below there are no smoke marks on the front of the outer arch. I do have a few hairline cracks though, but this seems to be normal. At this point we decided the oven was hot enough to bake some bread. It turned out pretty good for a first effort.




With the technology we have today for cooking – convection microwaves, induction cook tops etc – there’s still something special about cooking with fire!
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  #24  
Old 04-18-2011, 04:25 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

That's a very nice dome to smoke chamber transition. ..... among the best thought out.
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  #25  
Old 04-18-2011, 11:39 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Sharkey, I noticed you followed the basic design that Field Furnace provide, I too will be utilising them for the firebricks. I would be interested in knowing what diameter your oven is. I think your transition is extremely neat and your chimney opening allows for a good flow of smoke. You mentioned you used your tool to measure the required angle of the arch brick for the door arch. Don’t suppose you noted what the approximate angle was? I noticed that the door and entrance arch firebricks are tapered i.e. arch brick 345 x 115 x 75/51mm. arch brick 345 x 115 x 75/63mm How did you find using them?

Great effort with the oven, will be interested in seeing what design you come up with for your chimney! I have a couple of tonnes of Gosford sandstone which I will be using for my oven render.

Bert
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  #26  
Old 04-19-2011, 03:55 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Hi Bert

Yes, the guys at Field Furnace are very helpful. Mine is sort of a hybrid of Field Furnace and Forno Bravo. It is a 42 incher, which is about 1070mm. I purchased the parts as an 1100mm kit from Field Furnace. I changed a few things from the Field Furnace design.

I did the floor tiles on a 45 degree angle. I don't think it is any more difficult to do - most of the shapes are the same except for the landing. On the 45 you don't have horizontal gaps that stop your peel.

As I mentioned above I thought about the smoke channel in the side of the outer arch but decided the cuts were too much trouble for the perceived benefit. I focused on getting a smooth flow instead.

When I made the templates for my arches I re-jigged the tapered bricks until I finished with a brick at top centre (a keystone). If you just put the tapered arch bricks in where they seem to naturally fit you end up with a join at the top centre. I'm sure it makes no difference to the cooking; I just think an arch looks better with a keystone.

The pre-tapered arch bricks are probably easier to fit than non-tapered, but I have no experience to back that up. Just ensure you brace the side of your arch as you are fitting the top bricks. I had a little sideways movement in the side of the arch when I was forcing mortar in the final joints.

As far as the angles for the arch bricks, I think each brick is a little different. I dry stacked the arch with spacers one brick at a time and marked and cut each brick as I went.

In the photo below you can see the arch bricks in a pile ready to be mortared in. The first arch brick on the left side is already in place. You can see how this brick meets the dome – where the back left corner has been cut off. The angle is just a line from the bottom centre of the oven (my dome tool had a thin extension piece to mark this) and the surface needs to be a half brick (115mm) in length for the dome to meet it.

The other cut – the short edge of the bricks in the pile – actually becomes part of the inside of your dome. Again – just use your dome tool to mark this. I think I did this cut first and then marked and cut the other one. Then the top side of one brick can be traced onto the bottom side of the next brick and you just need to mark the top of that brick. As you climb up the arch the bricks get a bit longer.




My chimney is going to be stainless steel as it needs to be 3.6 metres tall to be above the height of the rock. The oven will be enclosed inside a sandstone walled house. I have a couple of tonnes of Blue Mountains sandstone that I excavated from the site that I need to do something with. I have already moved about 10 tonnes (by hand) and used it in walls, stairs and pathways.

Good luck with your build.
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  #27  
Old 04-19-2011, 07:09 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Sharkey, thanks for the further advice.

I too was thinking of building a hybrid oven.

I take your point abut the floor tiles. Seems like most of the ovens in the forum adopt this view.

I am excavating at present and hope to have a thread started shortly to document the project and ask for lots of advice. I expect you, Doug and Brickie from Oz amongst others will be sick of all my questions by the end .

Are you happy with the 42 inch size or would you have gone bigger, I note Karangidude built a 48 inch and there is not a massive difference in the internal diameter.

Keep taking pictures. I am interested in seeing how you enclose the oven with the sandstone. We had rain last weekend and a small piece of sandstone weighed a considerable amount with the water absorption. A sealer will definitely be required on my sandstone render to minimise the water absorption which will greatly add force on the internal dome.

Bert
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  #28  
Old 04-24-2011, 04:32 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Hi Sharkey
Just thought Id put my 2 bits in on sealing. I'm in brisbane and have suffered from moisture over the rain this summer. Rain rain and more rain. I let an expert... a Mason look at my oven (I know gutsey move) but he was a friend of a friend and he pointed out that all materials rock and brick will soak up a certain amount of moisture. As long as you have moisture barrier in you base (which I do) to seal of the moisture that the brick/rock will naturally attract he recons a couple of watered down coats of Boncrete will do the job. Its not poisonious will not change the colour and should not make things shiney (if you don't put too many layers).
I'm still waiting for the dryer wheather to try this out but I recon it should work and the good thing is the old boncrete is cheap and easy to obtain
PS love the setting
Regards
Cobblerdave
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  #29  
Old 04-24-2011, 09:40 PM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Hello Sharkey, cobblerdave,

The following is from the FAQ page at The Solution for DIY and Renovating

"Can I use Bondcrete to waterproof my concrete slab"?

"No, BondCrete is not a waterproofing product and will re-emulsify when it comes into contact with water".


Bondall has other concrete treatment products. Were you thinking of one of them instead? Maybe avoid a problem by doing a little research of their product line.

Cheers,
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  #30  
Old 04-27-2011, 12:21 AM
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Default Re: Building Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Bert

So far I am happy with the size. Plus, as you can see in my photos, I did not have a lot of room to work with.


Thanks Dave and Bob.

Yes, I have bought a pump pack of one of the Bondall sealers and plan to use it on the oven and surrounding rock and brick walls.



I am a couple of weeks behind on posting because I’ve been too busy getting my oven ready and cooking in it. Easter was just a five day pizza fest. Here is an update of the last couple of weeks.


I continued with curing fires trying to get as much moisture out before I insulated. We cooked roasts and breads during this time and they were great. Next fire I noticed that the dome was mostly cleared so decided to try a pizza.




This took about 4 minutes to cook and was the best pizza I have ever eaten. It was beyond my expectations. One mouthful made all the effort worth while.




And later during that firing the dome cleared completely. We cooked another 4 pizzas and they were all fantastic.

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