#11  
Old 11-17-2005, 02:27 PM
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beautiful work!
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  #12  
Old 11-18-2005, 12:07 PM
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Default topping it off

I have figured out how I want to top my wall. I have about 45 feet of wall in addition to the oven. I dont want to run the wall much higher than 3.5 feet, but I still want a bit more screen on top to lighten it up a bit. I considered wood, as I am an able carpenter, but didnt want to go with lattice or anything like that. I was thinking perhaps wrought iron, but I am not much of a welder and that gets pricey real fast. The I hit it, soft copper tubing! I can bend it with a tubing bender attach it to the top of the wall with nipples of hard copper tubing brazed on to it. I know I will be able to make some fairly fanciful curlycues to top off the wall. It is not so soft that it cannot handle a clematis or perhaps some hop vines growing on it. I went to my local metal salvage yard yesterday after work and procured about 90 feet of 1 inch thick walled soft copper, and a full 60 foot roll of " soft copper for the more elaborate curls. It wound up costing 300 bucks for the materials, but I know I will be able to do something fun with it. I love this!
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  #13  
Old 11-18-2005, 12:46 PM
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that could look really nice. i've actually done landscaping where a client insisted on sealing the copper features with urethane, preserving that bright gaudy look. copper is at its best, IMO, when it oxidizes and blends in well with the landscape as a greenish color. there's a reason why lots of old buildings use copper roofs and gutter/downspouts. they last for a really long time!
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  #14  
Old 11-18-2005, 08:24 PM
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Lightbulb Copper tubing curlycues

#80


(M) Chad wrote, in part:

(C) "Then I hit it, soft copper tubing! I can bend it with a tubing bender attach it to the top of the wall with nipples of hard copper tubing brazed on to it.

(M) I have an easier and cheaper way.

Go to:

http://photobucket.com/albums/a318/marceld/Ecolodge/

(M) which is a sub folder called, "Ecolodge". There you'll see more images which compare soldering nipples to bending tubing. Here should follow just one image. I didn't copy more here as this does not directly relate to oven building but if you'd like to ask me more about these images, write me to marceld@efn.org



(M) I will also post images of a form I built to aid in bending. That image also shows progress on the perlcrete so I can easily justify posting it. I think I'll put it in the Photo section, or perhaps the other closely related one.

(C) I know I will be able to make some fairly fanciful curlycues to top off the wall. It is not so soft that it cannot handle a clematis or perhaps some hop vines growing on it. I went to my local metal salvage yard yesterday after work and procured about 90 feet of 1 inch thick walled soft copper, and a full 60 foot roll of " soft copper for the more elaborate curls. It wound up costing 300 bucks for the materials, but I know I will be able to do something fun with it. I love this![/QUOTE]

Ciao,

Marcel
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Old 11-18-2005, 08:59 PM
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Default Foil and "curlycues"

#81

(M) I decided to Reply to my own post since Chad could see the jig and the rest of you my progress with the perlcrete on Paul's chicken wire over my foil:

(M) Here next is a picture of my a corner of my oven foundation slab to show a possible tile we're considering for the entire slab.

(M) Chad, it also shows a piece of treated 2x6 with 2 different diameter pipe nipples attached; a 1/2", and a 3/4". If you use a hammer over those pipes, you can get the proper configuration for soldering and avoid the cost of the fittings, some of which, e.g. the + shape run a few dollars for just 1.



================================================== ===

(M) The next shot shows a face view of the oven. Now the lip below the firebricks has been filled. We hope to adhere decorative "Listello" tiles, about 3 or 4 inches on a side on that smooth vertical plane which is now about 8"

(M) Notice that wood is already stacked in the storage area, the bricks adjacent the chimney flue are blackened from the first 3 test firings, and firebricks are temporarily placed on each side of the hearth opening:



================================================== ==

(M) The last image:



shows Paul's suggested chicken wire helping to support the perlcrete. The bricks are temporarily placed where they will help to hold the chicken wire against the foil. Because of the compound curve, I had to snip and/or remove extra chicken wire. I think I may be able to finish this thin layer tomorrow. Then I will be able to later apply much more perlcrete since it will have the rough surface for adhesion. Then, I can start on the housing cover and finally pour dry perlite over the dome.

P.S. I also hope to actually use the oven for baking pizza!

Ciao,

Marcel
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  #16  
Old 11-21-2005, 01:22 PM
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Default Laid up more wall

Well this weekend, we laid up a lot more wall. I have to go get another 20 or 30 blocks to finish it off height-wise and will post more pics as it goes. Next, I get to go rock hounding down on the Nooksack river for good rocks to include in my wall. Oh there is a pic of the oven dome and hearth as well.

Marcel, I am assuming you used soft copper for the top of your hoo haws there... The big stuff I got is huge compared to that. I do like your ideas for joining the pipes without fittings though. I would wager I can make that work for me as well.
Thanks
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Bellingham Bread Oven-cinderblockwally.jpg   Bellingham Bread Oven-oscarwall.jpg   Bellingham Bread Oven-oven-hearth.jpg  
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Last edited by janprimus; 11-21-2005 at 02:03 PM.
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  #17  
Old 11-21-2005, 05:03 PM
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Marcel,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcel
shows Paul's suggested chicken wire helping to support the perlcrete. The bricks are temporarily placed where they will help to hold the chicken wire against the foil. Because of the compound curve, I had to snip and/or remove extra chicken wire. I think I may be able to finish this thin layer tomorrow. Then I will be able to later apply much more perlcrete since it will have the rough surface for adhesion.
Nice work. It's weird how we are leap frogging one another and doing similar (though not identical) work and designs.

A couple weekends ago, we poured our perlite layer in a single evening using a simply form of a 4x8 sheet of thin masonite cut in half length-wise as a form to hold the perlite against the dome. We also used aluminum foil and chicken wire.

It's still not entirely dry, but it works GREAT! We even left the masonite forms on while cooking a steak in there the other night and only took them off when we put the steel framing back up last night (we lifted it off to do the pour). That revealed to me just how wet the perlite still was!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcel
P.S. I also hope to actually use the oven for baking pizza!
I don't know how you've managed to wait this long! Even though it wasn't ready, we've already used the oven for 2 different pizza sessions, to roast a chicked (to test out our idea of cooking the turkey in there this week), and to make Tuscan steak this weekend (which was excellent, but a mixed success).
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  #18  
Old 01-18-2006, 10:49 AM
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Default wall work has begun

Well we have begun the task of actually putting rocks and bricks on the wall. We have more on than in this photo, but I willl have to take a shot of it and post it tomorrow. It has begun, this is very exciting.
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Last edited by janprimus; 01-26-2006 at 09:17 AM. Reason: misspelling
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  #19  
Old 01-23-2006, 12:50 PM
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Default more wall pictures

More wall pictures from Bellingham.

In one, you see how the rock and brickwork is shaping up. It is very satisfying to do this sort of work. I had forgotten how much I missed it.

The other with the yellow pipes is the oven base. Since I have a refractory hearth, it needs to be supported more than just standing on the base. I thought of pouring a slab underneath the hearth, but that seemed a major PITA to do the form work. What I did was notch the tops of the blocks with my carbide grinder filled the notches with rather dry thick concrete and tapped the 1 blackpipe into place. It gives me the support I need and I can fill the cells with the pipe on them full and give extra support to the oven that way. When we set the hearth in a few days, it will have been insulated on the bottom and will still be set with a supporting bead of mud around the perimeter edge. Yes, I made it so that it drains toward the door about a ⅓ of a bubble off level. I think I have figured out how to top my dome now as well. I have a friend who knows how to do all the calculations to make a copper dome for it. I am looking forward to that.
Chad
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  #20  
Old 02-15-2006, 01:46 PM
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Default latest pic

Here we go with more stones and bricks going on. This is a real fun process, slow but fun.

Chad
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