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  #41  
Old 01-07-2013, 02:16 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

What do you guys think about adding a single column at the center of the base with 8x8x16 blocks, to add additional support at the center of the oven
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  #42  
Old 01-07-2013, 02:53 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

VWiz,

I squared off my wood storage area for a couple reasons, first, I did not need all that space in the corners for my wood storage and second, to give my hearth some additional support, although I poured a 5.5" hearth floor with 1 foot on center #5 rebar. However, I have seen some builds without a center support wall. So it is a matter of choice and how thick your hearth floor is and type of reinforcement. It will be holding alot of weight with the brick dome and floor. Depending how you place the support wall may impact your ability to access the area underneath. Good luck.
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42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.-21-forming-hearth-5.4.12.jpg   42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.-23a-rebar-done-5.11.12.jpg  
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  #43  
Old 01-07-2013, 03:08 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

Thanks Russell, ya i did notice what you did, i will keep mine large and just add a single column, so its not mandatory but preference is what I'm understanding
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  #44  
Old 01-07-2013, 03:10 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by V-wiz View Post
What do you guys think about adding a single column at the center of the base with 8x8x16 blocks, to add additional support at the center of the oven
I have looked at several builds that have done just that. I am sure that it has made several builders more confident with their builds. However, my vote is to not do it. The center of the hearth is not where the weight of the oven is resting. The weight Is evenly dispersed by the dome to the outer edges.

You can add an inch or two to the thickness to your hearth, use a little extra rebar, and/or include monlithic concrete beams in your hearth pour to keep this area open. The center post will just be an obstacale if you want to access that large amount of realestate under your oven. You might later even want to use it for a rolling/slide out drawer for your oven tools. If you put that post in, the far reaches of your wood storage area will be just an area for critters .
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Last edited by Gulf; 01-07-2013 at 04:17 PM. Reason: spelling
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  #45  
Old 01-07-2013, 03:19 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

Thanks gulf, its pretty big in that area, so i don't think 8" (facing the door) will be much of a bug, plus i am going to build a door so it will be closed off. I do plan on making a gothic arch using forms and concrete so that should add to the support? Thanks again

On another note i was thinking instead of using a ceramic fiber board for the floor i can use perlite, will 4 bags of 4 cf be enough? I called a nursery per your suggestion and found them for $12 for a 4 cf bag, thats way cheaper than the boards. What do you guys think? Thank you

Last edited by V-wiz; 01-07-2013 at 11:12 PM.
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  #46  
Old 01-08-2013, 10:01 AM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

I put a 4"x8"x16" cinder block column in the center of my hearth (for peace of mind). I understand (and agree with) Gulf RE the weight distribution of the oven but I wanted the extra security anyway. As it turns out, I should have used more rebar. I placed rebar approx 12" OC from side to side but only had 3 pcs spanning the width of the oven (I simply ran out of rebar - I should have gone out for more but I thought - "Hey I've got a pillar in the middle anyway".

Ironically (unfortunately) I still ended up with a crack in my hearth slab I'm pretty sure it runs right through the slab from front to back (I haven't removed my plywood form yet). I've been wondering if my column acted as a stress riser in the center of my slab during my final day of curing (my wife went gonzo with the fire on the last day and cleared the dome while I was at work - I was only planning to hit 600 -

I may install another support wall underneath the slab in the spring since it is hard to take advantage of all that space in the back anyway (unless you build a giant drawer). In hind sight I would have created an opening at the back of the base for additional storage in the rear (“I” shaped base instead of a box). C'est la vie.

Incidentally, I have found one advantage to having the pillar in the middle; It helps to stack and organize my wood and keeps my apple from tumbling into my cherry and ash (I use red oak stored in a separate woodshed for the bulk of my cooking).
RE: Insulation under the cooking floor, I wish I had used some V-crete in addition to my insulating firebrick. I have 1 layer of 2.5” thick insulating brick which were great for creating a level surface for my hearth bricks but I should have used another 2”-3” of v-crete underneath that.

Good Luck with the rest of your build.
Regards
AT
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42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.-219.jpg   42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.-229.jpg   42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.-217.jpg  

Last edited by ATK406; 01-08-2013 at 10:07 AM.
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  #47  
Old 01-08-2013, 03:14 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

Wow that sucks, i dont think the crack was from lack of rebar, there are many concrete driveways that dont have rebar and dont crack(im in the construction industry) so there may have been other factors, i also see that the slab is nice and thick,
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  #48  
Old 01-08-2013, 03:33 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

V-Wiz
You are going to want your final decision on insulation under the floor soon as this will impact the height of your stand. More is insulation better - I am very satisfied with the performance of the FB ceramic board (no V-Crete). As I built my stand I ended up with the cooking floor 52 inches above my feet, which is taller than most. In my calculations I failed to account for the fact that my slab was above the level of the patio (4 inches) and I later wanted to add splits beneath my 2 inch FB floor tiles. I was panicked that I made have made a fatal flaw but forged ahead. I still have not completed my landing in front of the oven - But I can say that I am pleased with the working height (I am 6'2").
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  #49  
Old 01-08-2013, 05:56 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by V-wiz View Post
Wow that sucks, i dont think the crack was from lack of rebar, there are many concrete driveways that dont have rebar and dont crack(im in the construction industry) so there may have been other factors, i also see that the slab is nice and thick,
Thanks for the feed back. I've got a theory too;

My support slab does have a joint that runs right though the center of my block base. The two halves of the slab are not completely flush with each other and I did not lay my block on a mortar bed (to distribute the load across the joint) - Doh! The crack propogates up through the block base very near this joint and on up through the hearth slab. Maybe my block base settled (cracked) because of this joint and cracked the hearth slab along with it?? I'm not too worried about it, the crack has not gotten any bigger. Just the same I might put another support wall perpendicular to my 4x16 column - I don't think it's an issue really....but I still haven't removed the 2x4 and plywood support under the hearth .

I have a similar corner design like yours. I will be interested to watch your build this winter...since I can't work on my own!

Thanks again,
Regards,
AT
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  #50  
Old 01-08-2013, 11:20 PM
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Default Re: 42" Brick Oven & Grill in Los Angeles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dvm View Post
V-Wiz
You are going to want your final decision on insulation under the floor soon as this will impact the height of your stand. More is insulation better - I am very satisfied with the performance of the FB ceramic board (no V-Crete). As I built my stand I ended up with the cooking floor 52 inches above my feet, which is taller than most. In my calculations I failed to account for the fact that my slab was above the level of the patio (4 inches) and I later wanted to add splits beneath my 2 inch FB floor tiles. I was panicked that I made have made a fatal flaw but forged ahead. I still have not completed my landing in front of the oven - But I can say that I am pleased with the working height (I am 6'2").

Thanks for the advice, you are right, i need to decide on the insulation however not because of height, i am only 5'9"-10" tall so 4 rows of cinder block plus all the other good stuff should be good for me.
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