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  #451  
Old 07-18-2010, 08:26 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: kingston washington
Posts: 184
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I buried the whole works underground. Now the whole thing is buried in vegetation
...except the front.
Made 20 pizza last night ...party!

berryst
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  #452  
Old 07-18-2010, 09:21 AM
mklingles's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 93
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

That's really cool! My original plan was to build a roof structure over the oven location and have grass grow on top of the roof, but the location we settled on just didn't get enough sun.
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  #453  
Old 07-24-2010, 02:52 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: London
Posts: 17
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

What a beautiful build! Very nice work.
I'm impressed with your brickwork and love the planters on top.

I was wondering about your brick placement tool. I decided to make my dome height slightly lower that the radius as well and came up with a tool that gives me an elliptical curve but there are a lot of drawbacks with mine in that it does actually give you the angle of the brick only the distance.

How did you make the measurements that set the tool up for each course?
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  #454  
Old 07-24-2010, 10:31 AM
kebwi's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by charliefarley View Post
What a beautiful build! Very nice work.
I'm impressed with your brickwork and love the planters on top.

I was wondering about your brick placement tool. I decided to make my dome height slightly lower that the radius as well and came up with a tool that gives me an elliptical curve but there are a lot of drawbacks with mine in that it does actually give you the angle of the brick only the distance.

How did you make the measurements that set the tool up for each course?
Very carefully. Here's my process, follow the diagram included in this post as I go:
  1. Draw the true curve that defines the dome profile: floor radius longer than dome height.
  2. Adjust this curve to account for the vertical sidewall (what is sometimes built with a soldier course, although I just laid bricks flat in two layers). This adjustment consists of raising the previous curve straight up off the floor so it still curves up to the apex from the top of the sidewall but at the sidewall it is a sheer vertical drop to the floor.
  3. Place bricks along the curve (rectangles). Start from the floor and make the side walls. Then follow the curve on up. Each brick should satisfy two placement constraints: tangent to the curve, i.e., the inner face is orthogonal to the derivative of the curve and perfectly abuts the curve, and meets the brick below it edge to edge (corner to corner in a 2D diagram). Note, I did this "by eye". Anyone who actually calculates this stuff is insane!
  4. Quit this process when there isn't enough room at the top to place more bricks (see my diagram, I just quit near the top leaving a gap in my design).
  5. Project each brick's radial axis to the floor of the oven (the radial "rays" in my diagram).
  6. Those rays define the point on the oven floor (a concentric circle around the center of the floor) where the brick placement tool must reach up from in order to properly place the brick with no upward or downward tilting.
  7. Calculate the various arm lengths. There are two arms (floor and support) attached by a hinge and there are two such arm lengths unique to every single brick level in the diagram. The floor arm gets shorter as you go up the oven and the support arm gets longer. That's just my oven though (well any ellipse I suppose).
  8. Now find some way of constructing a tool that can be adjusted to every required arm length on both arms for each level. My design is shown in the second photo of this post, but there are numerous ways this could be done.

Cheers!
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-domeprofile2.jpg   36" in Seattle-96-brickplacementtool.jpg   36" in Seattle-104-brickplacementtool.jpg  
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  #455  
Old 07-24-2010, 12:01 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: London
Posts: 17
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Brilliant, thanks.

I've mocked up a photoshop file as per yours (42" diameter - 18" high dome), I'll give this a go tomorrow.

So you took your measurements with a mock up arc in real size rather than in the software? The diagram was just for you to visualize this? It's certainly helped me understand how this can be accomplished.
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36" in Seattle-brickangles42radius18high.jpg  
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  #456  
Old 07-24-2010, 12:09 PM
kebwi's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by charliefarley View Post
So you took your measurements with a mock up arc in real size rather than in the software? The diagram was just for you to visualize this? It's certainly helped me understand how this can be accomplished.
I'm not sure I understand. The design was done in software. Once I had the diagram shown above, I measured the relevant lengths on the diagram (two arm lengths per brick level) and used those lengths to govern the construction of the physical brick placement tool and its adjustment from one level to the next.
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  #457  
Old 07-24-2010, 01:04 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,855
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

If you attached a turnbuckle to the arm a few turns each time you go up a course would be a neat solution.
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  #458  
Old 07-27-2010, 10:01 PM
mklingles's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 93
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I qualify as insane! I'm trying to do the calculations for my dome. Hopefully next week I'll start a thread with my spreadsheet posted. A thread for mathematically insane oven builders. (insert maniacal laugh track...).

I attached a turnbuckle. It's working well. Be warned you need left handed nuts and threaded rod to go with the turnbuckle.
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  #459  
Old 08-06-2010, 12:02 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: London
Posts: 17
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Thank you Kebwi for this tool, it is working out well for me.

Attaching a turnbuckle to this tool allowed me to work out my inner arch cuts.
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-r0011979.jpg   36" in Seattle-r0011986.jpg  
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  #460  
Old 08-06-2010, 12:08 AM
kebwi's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Oh man, that's awesome, I can't believe someone replicated my design.

Cheers!
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