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  #361  
Old 04-05-2010, 09:10 AM
kebwi's Avatar
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Thanks, but I would rather learn how to use proper pizza flour first. Once I get basic pizza figured out I might try experimenting with other things. As for the my routine, it's basically the instructions in the FB pizza ebook. I'm a little shady on the details because my wife made yesterday's dough (I was outside doing construction on the oven). I'm sure she's following the recipe.

I handled the dough after she mixed it, so I know what happened from that point forward. I dumped it out, it was very light and sticky, which I took as a good sign. I folded it in thirds, rotated it, folded it in thirds again, plunked it in a bowl for two hours, seam down. Then I took that out and quartered it (a whole recipe according to FB), folded each chunk and rolled it into a ball, put in tupperware for another hour, seam down. Then made pizza.
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  #362  
Old 04-05-2010, 01:11 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

The semolina addition will add crunch to your pizza base when used with any flour. We always use it add about 7%
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  #363  
Old 04-05-2010, 07:46 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Hey Keith,

Do you have the temperature reading for the cooking floor as you're cooking? How long does it take for the pizzas to cook? Can you provide pics of the pizza crust cross-section and underneath? I think I know the reason of your tough crust but I need the info for the above questions to confirm.

Raffy
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Last edited by Raffy; 04-05-2010 at 07:52 PM.
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  #364  
Old 04-06-2010, 07:51 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

What's the reason Raffy? Even if your aren't sure, share the wisdom. I think the floor was around 600. I don't know how to make it hotter than that since the oven was fully blast and fully cleared with a 900 dome. I didn't precisely time the pizzas this latest attempt. Not two long, maaaybe longer than the prescribed 90s, but I'm not sure.
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  #365  
Old 04-06-2010, 07:59 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I get about the same, but the floor goes up to about 700. I want to build a low rack to keep the fire (and the insulating ashes)off the floor. I also plan on putting the door on for about 10-15 minutes next time to try and get some equalization after I de-ash it.
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  #366  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:01 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

But that would kill the fire. You are specifically supposed to keep the fire going during pizza. I agree with your hunch though, I'm wondering if the ash and coals are actually insulating the floor. Perhaps what I need to do is push the fire to one side, get it roaring on one side, then wait a few minutes to cook pizza. Maybe then the heat would beat down on the floor and bring it up to temp.

I need to read the relevant FB books on this again. I'm confused by my floor temp.
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  #367  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:06 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Well, the way I do it is remove most of the coals and ash, then put just some coals and more wood in. I will just wait until I take the door off to put them back in.
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  #368  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:34 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Keith - is the fire you have going licking the side of the dome? In my experience, the fire needs to be big enough to curl up the inside of your dome almost reaching the keystone (and the logs should touch the dome to encourage drawing the flame up the dome wall). In my oven, that's critical for keeping the floor temps in the 750-800+ range. As soon as I move the ashes over to one side, I immediately throw on some logs and keep some burning while I'm cooking pizza.

Like Tscarborough, I also sometimes remove a shovel or two of ashes if my initial fire was really big. I think too many ashes keeps the oven from getting really hot.
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  #369  
Old 04-06-2010, 09:12 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

So what your saying is to much (a*s) keeps it from getting hot?

or just moving the a*s makes it hotter lol

this would answer a real big question around here
to much a*s could be her fault
need to move ones a*s would be my fault
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  #370  
Old 04-06-2010, 10:08 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Hi Keith,

Based on the pics you provided, I can only deduce that your cooking floor temp is too low. I cook my pizzas at around 400 - 425 degrees celsius resulting in a thin crunchy layer outside and a nice "bready" (for want of a better term) layer inside. If the bottom side takes too long to cook, it will result in a tough and chewy crust. If you say that you cook in the 600 F, roughly 315 C, I definitely think temperature is the culprit.

How soon after the firing do you start cooking? The dome gets hot pretty quick but its a matter of getting the cooking floor to "catch up" with the dome's temp. For a commercial oven (running 24/7), we had to wait one hour after firing til we could start cooking in the morning. Even when we could feel the blazing heat from the opening, we knew that the floor still wasn't hot enough til the prescribed waiting time was over.

About the ash, even a thin barrier of ash will affect the transmission of heat to the crust. In the pizzeria where I used to work, if we got the cooking floor too hot, we would scatter/throw rock salt onto the floor to keep the crust from burning. It was an effective method that we used when too much fuel was added to the fire.

Lastly, I recommend you wait a while after you have wiped the cooking floor with a wet rag. It may only be seconds but thats enough to reduce the cooking floor temp.

Sorry for the long answer. Hope this solves your problem.

Raffy
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36" in Seattle-18274d1270450554-36-seattle-292-pizzas7and8.jpg   36" in Seattle-18275d1270450596-36-seattle-293-pizzas7and8.jpg  
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Last edited by Raffy; 04-06-2010 at 11:06 AM.
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