Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Good Background Information > Brick Oven Photos

Like Tree1Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #291  
Old 02-28-2010, 10:33 PM
kebwi's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Inaugural pizzas.

These were made from approximately a half-batch of the FB napoletana recipe, although we rounded a little up on the yeast. The FB pizza book includes both volume and weight measurements and they don't seem to be in agreement and the volume measurement seems very very low (in yeast) relative to other pizza recipes (and about half the weight measurement in the same book!).

Anyway, Caputo 00 pizza flour, San Marzanos, mozzarella, fresh basil. A second pizza with the same and also including black olives and some red onion.

The cornicone didn't puff up at all, not the slightest bit. In addition, I lost a lot of heat. As you can see in the previous post and in the cooking photo in this post, the whitening of the dome never came down the sides. By the time I was cooking, the dome was around 500-600 and the floor on the pizza side was around 200-300. Took upwards of ten minutes to cook each pizza.

Admittedly, I hadn't done a very good job of keeping the fire going. I left it for a long time to go inside and make the pizzas, duh!. When I came back out, there was a very nice bed of coals, but no actual flame. The photos don't show it, but for the second pizza, I added some wood and "bellowed" it up to a good little fire, but it was too late, the oven had cooled too much and the pizza was already in the oven. It obviously doesn't work that way.

Live and learn.

My only real concern is the lack of "puff". Would that have worked better if I had maintained better temps? What actual temps do I want to see on the dome and the floor via IR thermometer? Should both be 900 during cooking?

Oh right, and my second pizza tore on the oven floor, thus becoming a donut pizza. Sigh.
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-243-firstpizzareadytocook.jpg   36" in Seattle-244-secondpizzareadytocook.jpg   36" in Seattle-246-firstpizzacooking.jpg   36" in Seattle-247-firstpizzadone.jpg   36" in Seattle-248-secondpizzadone.jpg  

__________________

Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

WFO Webpage:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Thread:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Last edited by kebwi; 02-28-2010 at 10:36 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #292  
Old 03-01-2010, 02:04 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,705
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Kebwi,
If you still have a black rim around the bottom then it means you still have moisture in your oven. You will probably find it will all go white the next time you fire. You will also find that your oven will get up to temp faster and retain heat better the more you use it
Reply With Quote
  #293  
Old 03-01-2010, 02:06 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,705
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Forgot to add that you will also find the ovens fuel consumption will also drop as it becomes drier.
Reply With Quote
  #294  
Old 03-01-2010, 07:34 AM
kebwi's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Water has a tremendous heat capacity, so it will kill the efficiency of any oven. I am a little concerned about water in my current design. The goal is to fully waterproof the exterior with a shell of acrylic fortified SBC, perhaps even coated with additional concrete waterproofing on top of that. The reasons are two fold. One: I live in a wet area (Seattle), so water will be an aggressive problem, and two, my design will have dirt and plants on top of it and I don't want the moisture seeping through the exterior facade (I intend to put plastic under the dirt, but still...)

Problem is, I envision water constantly seeping into the bottom of the oven across the hearth. In fact, I hope the InsBlock doesn't slowly rot out from under the oven. Whenever water seeps in under the oven, it will only have one way to go: up. As the oven is heated, the water will wick (and boil and steam) its way up through the InsWool HP insulation to the top of the dome, where it will be effectively trapped under the SBC exterior. I'm not sure what the long term implications of that are.
__________________

Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

WFO Webpage:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Thread:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Reply With Quote
  #295  
Old 03-01-2010, 07:57 AM
bbell's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Seattle
Posts: 193
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Keith, congrats on the first pizzas! I too think the oven will need a couple of more rounds to get rid of the moisture. Also, I found it best to keep a healthy fire going while pizza baking is in full swing. See pic.

Did you ever find Pacific Food Importers (Big John's PFI)?
__________________
Bill

Oven Build:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Progress pictures:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Cooking pictures:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #296  
Old 03-01-2010, 08:02 AM
kebwi's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Re: Big John's Pacific Food Importers:

I intend to head down that way at some point. They have bulk and large volume Caputo flour, but they're so far away that the savings are only realizable if I buy a pretty significant amount. I'm not sure of the rate I'll go through it relative to its shelf-life. Bottom line, it's about $2/lb at Metropolitan Market and $1/lb at BFI, and it costs me about $2 and half a Saturday to drive there and back. If I buy 20lbs, that's $18 saved and much of a weekend shot. I dunno, maybe it's worth it.

Anyway.........
__________________

Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

WFO Webpage:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Thread:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Last edited by kebwi; 03-01-2010 at 09:18 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #297  
Old 03-01-2010, 06:10 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 122
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I have to agree that you probably still have some moisture in the brick. I don't know how long your fire is, but I find I need to run mine hard for 1-1/2 hours for the bricks to saturate with heat. It used to take about 2 hours, but is easier to light and takes less time now. If you only burn it for about 50 or 60 minutes, I would think that a tremendous amount of heat is travelling through the bricks to their cooler side. There's a lot of mass to thoroughly heat there.

I was having the same performance "issues" you were, but you'll quickly learn what your particular oven needs. After my last pizza cook, I was amazed at the heat retention with the door installed. We had usable heat degrading only to 225 degrees after 2 days! I don't think it would have been very good with only 50 or 60 minutes though.

At this stage in your curing, try a good hard 2 hour burn, then cook your pizzas with a small log burning on the coals off to the side. I think the proper temperatures are a variable you need to consider in the quality of your dough too.

Congratulations! It's good to see your ready for summer.

Ken
Reply With Quote
  #298  
Old 03-01-2010, 06:33 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 2,998
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I am a believer in a small fire to start then the big one. It seems to me that if you just start with a Big Scary Fire, then you are losing a lot of BTU's up the stack. There is a limit to the rate of heat absorption of the masonry mass, and I don't think it is linear. That is, the hotter it is, the faster it will absorb heat up to the point where it is heat-saturated.

I could be and am probably wrong, but that is my theory.
Reply With Quote
  #299  
Old 03-01-2010, 06:37 PM
kebwi's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,010
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I see, so a long moderate fire as opposed to an instantaneous bonfire. I suppose I can see the argument for that. I don't know if it's within the purview of my personality though.
__________________

Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

WFO Webpage:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Thread:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Reply With Quote
  #300  
Old 03-01-2010, 06:52 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 2,998
Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Well, at some point you have to have a big fire to hit those temps. It just seems to me to be moderately more efficient to ramp it up to that level.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Seattle frostline kebwi Getting Started 13 09-17-2009 01:05 AM
Building permits in Seattle kebwi Getting Started 8 09-06-2009 12:07 PM
Pizza North East of Seattle?? chuckster Travel 2 05-25-2009 07:20 PM
Planning to visit Via Tribunali's in Seattle mgraban Brick Oven Restaurant Reviews 3 10-30-2007 10:05 AM
Tutta Bella Pizzeria -- Seattle james Brick Oven Restaurant Reviews 3 05-29-2007 12:43 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:21 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC