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  #281  
Old 02-21-2010, 08:06 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

All that water you used to clean them. It will go away.
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  #282  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:48 PM
Serf
 
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Location: seattle
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

i live in seattle too. check out pics of my oven
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  #283  
Old 02-21-2010, 10:47 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by matty View Post
i live in seattle too. check out pics of my oven
Didn't see an album or a thread with photos on your profile. Where are they?
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  #284  
Old 02-22-2010, 03:22 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Kieth, you've hit WFO home-run: no cracks AND your oven vents properly! I was a tad worried at first when I saw the size of the final square opening against your round flu pipe (it's hard see the size in those photos) but was glad to see your 3 brick high vent transition at such a beautiful angle,sloping smoothly to your opening that it just had to work well and it does . Having the tall vent transition chamber adds to the volume of air that starts the draw upward. Cool utube video you posted too.
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  #285  
Old 02-22-2010, 03:41 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Agreed. I was worried about that too. The mouth of the vent is a rectangle measuring about six inches front-back and eight inches across, forty-eight inches square, which is almost identical to an eight-inch pipe (fifty square inches). However, when you place an eight-inch pipe on top of that six-by-eight opening, the transition is pretty sloppy, lots of edge-overlap. I wasn't sure it would work too well (I should take a photo up the vent to show how roughly that transition fits). The fact that I went four feet instead of my originally intended two feet probably helped a lot too.

My opinion, if I may be frank without sounding cocky, is that having looked at lots of photos on FB, I believe the thing that really makes my vent work well is the tapered sides, the fact that it is a true inverted funnel. A lot of vents on FB are basically a hole cut in the top of an otherwise approximately flat roof, the roof of the arch...and most FB arches are much flatter than mine since they aren't a full hemisphere. I suspect a lot of Pompeii ovens which leak smoke are doing so because of the vent shape more than any other factor (flu diameter or length for example).

I'm not saying that to show off, I'm saying it so that whatever nugget of wisdom is contained within such a description may be captured by future readers/designers/builders.

Thanks as always for the compliments and positive encouragement.

Cheers!
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  #286  
Old 02-22-2010, 05:32 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

No, you are correct, Kebwi. The important factors for good draw are Square inches cross section of flue, smoothness of transitions, and height of stack.

There are formulas for fireplaces, but I do not know of any for ovens. From what I see of the ovens posted here, the main problem is the size or lack of a smoke chamber. If the inner arch and outer arch are the same height, and the distance between them is too small to allow an adequate sized flue, then the stack height has to be increased. Conversely, If the entrance to the flue is above the height of the inner and outer arches, then the stack height can be decreased, although the flue size should not be. A smoke chamber is the area above the level of the arch(es) up to the entrance to the flue. For fireplaces, it is generally as tall as it is wide, although that is not practical for the design of the Pompeii oven.

What I have found for problem fireplaces that smoke is that standard fire lighting practices have to be altered (and for ovens, I am guessing that this is the optimal way anyway).

A small, hot, smokeless fire should be built to pre-heat the flue. Fat-lighter or firestarter logs work well for this. Once the flue is warmed up, the fire should be built up gradually instead of creating a pyre and lighting it off all at once.

Personally, I do not ever expect to have smoke come out of my outer arch, other than a stray puff from a breeze.
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  #287  
Old 02-22-2010, 05:42 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

While I've got your attention Tscar, do you mind me picking your knowledge brain a bit?

I inquired about the necessity of bolt/washer "T-locks" to hold the hardi to the vermicrete and you had been of the opinion that it would be unnecessary, that the hardi would adhere to the vermicrete. I'm not accusing, honestly, I just want to know how to do things correctly. As you have noticed, I used locks anyway, but for a few small sections of hardi I didn't bother, and after curing, those sections of hardi fell right off (see the photo of my eighth curing fire for an example). I had sponge-damped the inner face before filling the vermicrete, but it didn't stick anyway.

Do you have any thoughts on what I may have done wrong...and more critically, can you alleviate my fear that the SBC will suffer from a similar problem on the outer surface?...or what I should do to make sure it works properly unlike the vermicrete?

What do you think of this? Why didn't the vermicrete stick to the hardi? I'm just not sure what I did wrong and I don't want to make the same mistake with the SBC.

Thanks for any advice.

Cheers!
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  #288  
Old 02-22-2010, 05:46 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

You didn't do anything wrong, until the SBC is applied it is as fragile as the weakest part, i.e. the vermi-crete. Vermi-crete/perl-crete have adequate compressive strength, but almost zero shear strength.

Just prop those pieces back in and apply the SBC, no worries.
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  #289  
Old 02-22-2010, 11:29 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Yay, my 600th post. Somehow, I missed #500 as it flew by.

Here's the tenth curing fire, well into the low 800s at the top of the dome. My makeshift door is evolving; I added a 1000F thermometer, obviously intended for the final door. I had the idea of throwing some frozen bread dough (just crap from the store) on the hearth after I killed the fires and let the coals smolder for a while, but alas, the new thermometer barely broke 220F, so I didn't do the dough.

I'm still learning how to fire this thing (and still driving out some moisture I'm sure). I'm not running long fires, I admit it, maybe 30-45 minutes tops, and then I'm intentionally spreading the fires out because I don't want to stress the curing process (although I think I'm basically done now, two 800F fires, going for 900 next time), but nevertheless, I am hitting those temperatures, so I'm a little confused why I lose so much heat so rapidly (almost instantly) when I kill the fire. Where did the heat go? I would think that it isn't "soaking through the bricks" because I would expect the bricks to not reach 800 in the first place unless they were pretty darn hot all the way through...but I realize that everyone's testimonies suggest they fire for two solid hours when cooking, so I'm sure I just need to get into full gear and start loading wood in by the wheel-barrow full. I'm just a tad surprised at the rapidity with which it loses heat at the 30-45 minute mark.

Continuing this thought, I am not sure how to fire for cooking if I can't simply assume that meeting the target temperature is the proper indicator. After the dome hits 800-900 degrees, what else do I do? Just run the clock out for 90-120 minutes and then hope it's ready? That seems a little arbitrary. I guess there's this business about the dome going white, then spreading the fire so the white spreads down the sides. I haven't seen anything remotely like that (my oven is the blackiest blackestest shade of blacky black I've ever seen!).

Anyway, all's well, I expect things to work properly within a week or so. My plan is for pizza next weekend and bread the next day!

Final note to Seattlites: The Seattle Restaurant Store in Shoreline ROCKS! Thermometers, peels, pans, cutters, scales, brushes/rakes, absolutely the works, and they're open Saturdays.

Cheers!
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-232-tenthcuringfire.jpg   36" in Seattle-233-temporarydoorwiththermometer.jpg   36" in Seattle-234-temporarydoorwiththermometer.jpg   36" in Seattle-235-temporarydoorwiththermometer.jpg  
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  #290  
Old 02-28-2010, 10:21 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Made my first pizzas tonight! Here's the fire, the dome went over 1000 (my thermometer stops registering above 1000 so I can't specify measurements after that point). I still have exposed InsWool HP on top of the dome, about four to five inches. It went up to 140 and produced hoards of steam. However, where I have already poured vermicrete over the InsWool there was practically no rise in temperature, so I expect good results after I pour the third and last terrace of the enclosure. I think it was a good idea to drive the moisture out before enclosing the vermicrete anyway.

Despite the high temperatures, the whitening only came part way down the dome, as you can see in the photos. More discussion of this and other aspects of the actual cooking in the next post.

Pizza pics to follow...
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36" in Seattle-236-firstpizzafire.jpg   36" in Seattle-237-firstpizzafire.jpg   36" in Seattle-238-firstpizzafire.jpg   36" in Seattle-239-firstpizzafire.jpg  
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