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  #221  
Old 01-24-2010, 03:40 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Yes, it's my belief it will make the pizza taste better. All I really did was clean the hell out of it so there isn't mortar all over the place. Lots of scrubbing, lots of water.

Seriously, we'll see if I can make the outside look any good. I'm totally weirded out by the external construction phase.

...and thank you for the kind comments.
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  #222  
Old 01-26-2010, 10:44 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

A few more shots of the completed brickwork (assuming I don't do any further brickwork around the chimney area, which isn't necessarily decided). I removed the floor boards so the interior shots are now "complete".

BTW, does anyone have any thoughts on whether I should fill the angular gaps on the backside (interior side) of the arch (last photo)? I could cut some wedges and mortar them in. I'm unsure if it would help the smoke escape more efficiently or if it would help mitigate spalling along the exposed edges. Thoughts?
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-161-ventdone.jpg   36" in Seattle-162-ventdonefloorrevealed.jpg   36" in Seattle-163-ventdonefloorrevealed.jpg   36" in Seattle-164-archbackside.jpg  
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Last edited by kebwi; 01-26-2010 at 10:46 AM.
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  #223  
Old 01-26-2010, 10:53 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

I would definitely fill those gaps. I plan on chamfering the inside edge of the upper bricks, similar to how you did the outside of yours. Looks great, BTW.
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  #224  
Old 01-26-2010, 11:38 AM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

It's hard to see in that interior picture in the last post, but if you look carefully or look at (much) earlier pictures of my arch construction, the inside edge of the interior arch is also beveled, for exactly the purpose of easing the smoke's path.

Cheers!
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  #225  
Old 01-26-2010, 01:24 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Quote:
BTW, does anyone have any thoughts on whether I should fill the angular gaps on the backside (interior side) of the arch (last photo)? I could cut some wedges and mortar them in. I'm unsure if it would help the smoke escape more efficiently or if it would help mitigate spalling along the exposed edges.
I'm going to vote for leave it alone. Cracking is not unheard-of in brick ovens and to have brick slips unsupported by anything but mortar is not necessary. Also, I think your dome is so well built that there won't be any problem with turbulence from those little dips.
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  #226  
Old 01-30-2010, 05:40 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Framed up the cage that will hold about three inches of loose InsWool HP over the dome. It's basically the same stuff as the blankets that most FBers use. The cage is ordinary aluminum screen door material. I opted against the fiberglass screen although I don't know, maybe it would work too. Obviously, plastic mesh would be a bad idea as it might melt.

The cage is held down to the hearth with tapcons (second photo). I intend to fill the bottom three inches (next to the InsBlock 19 boards) with loose vermiculite, then go InsWool from there on up to the apex. Hopefully the vermiculite will hold the tabs (second photo) down and not work its way out through the bottom before I get a chance to build or otherwise enclose the next layer of construction (either vermicrete or an enclosure with vermiculite fill).

I am a little unsure how I will keep the InsWool from slipping out the front edge of the cage. The front edge will be held down to some degree by a wire tieing the left and right sides together through the groove behind the vent, but it may not be tight enough to prevent the InsWool from slipping out. I would duct-tape it down, but then it'll melt later which might not be pleasant. Another idea is to mortar the edge of the screen to the outside of the vent. Whatever, I'll figure something out.

The third and fourth photos show the chimney shoe. I'm using an 8" double-walled pipe (10" exterior). The basic premise is easy to visualize from the photos. The shoe will be three layers tall. The fourth photo shows that I beveled (chamfered) the front-lower edge of the two shoe bricks for the lowest shoe level that will extend slightly past the entry arch. It'll make sense in later posts.

As a side-note, the shoe bricks are the first bricks of the entire project that I used an angle-grinder to complete. All prior bricks were formed entirely with the tile saw. For these bricks, I hollowed out the curve with the saw as best as possible, then took an angle grinder with a masonry blade and smoothed it out. Worked like a charm, although I'm unclear whether it is appropriate to use a grinder as a "sander" as opposed to edge on like I used it to cut rebar. Hopefully this was kosher...or at least safe. Sure as hell did a number on the masonry blade, that's for certain.

Cheers!
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-165-inswoolcage.jpg   36" in Seattle-166-inswoolcage.jpg   36" in Seattle-167-chimneyshoedrystack.jpg   36" in Seattle-168-chimneyshoebricks.jpg  
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  #227  
Old 01-30-2010, 07:38 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Kebwi,

If you've never done masonry work before, you have definitely picked-up some serious skills!

Nice work!

Ken
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  #228  
Old 01-30-2010, 11:18 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

You haven't seen my foundation slab or my hearth then. They were abysmal...but I'm learning.
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  #229  
Old 01-31-2010, 04:47 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Built the chimney shoe.

There are not one, but two problems with the vent. First, the upper surface is not level. Second the sides (the triangles) are not symmetrical. This is more readily apparent if you carefully study their positions relative to the individual arch wedges under them.

The chimney shoe corrects the leveling problem by tilting slightly at each of the three brick layers such that the upper surface of the shoe is perfectly level. However, the pipe will obviously lean to the south when placed inside the shoe since it will rest on the vent. Therefore, I will probably put a thin layer of mortar on the upper surface of the vent inside the shoe on the south side so as to level the pipe's footprint.

As for the asymmetry there are a few options. The front facade of the oven will probably consist of a stucco-like surface that wraps around the brick of the arch, vent, and chimney shoe. If the stucco is perfectly flush with the arch and vent (the shoe protrudes over the vent about 3/4" incidentally, look closely) then I could angle-grind the two external triangular bricks on the right side back a bit from the front face and stucco over them partially to simulate the appearance on the left side. Alternatively, my final stucco (surface bonding cement, whatever) surface might protrude out from the brick anyway, in which case I can do the same thing without grinding the brick back, just stucco over the right triangles a bit.

It will depend on how the final enclosure comes together, so I'll figure it out then. I'm not too worried, so long as people don't get vertigo when they look at the oven.
Attached Thumbnails
36" in Seattle-169-chimneyshoedone.jpg   36" in Seattle-170-chimneyshoedone.jpg   36" in Seattle-171-chimneyshoedone.jpg   36" in Seattle-172-chimneyshoedone.jpg   36" in Seattle-173-chimneyshoedone.jpg  

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  #230  
Old 01-31-2010, 05:06 PM
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Default Re: 36" in Seattle

Worry less, cook more.
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