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  #21  
Old 06-03-2014, 07:20 AM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

I would be all over that site with a metal detector....
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  #22  
Old 06-03-2014, 05:30 PM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

If I had a week of spare time I would screen every shovel full .
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  #23  
Old 06-04-2014, 03:44 PM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulf View Post
If I had a week of spare time I would screen every shovel full .
I'm thinking it'd take at least a week....and that's be with a large mesh too !!

Stonecutter, if there'd been access to a metal detector, I'd have been real tempted to go over the area. But, there wasn't one available plus we had limestone on the brain at the time.
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  #24  
Old 06-04-2014, 03:58 PM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri



Here's a few more of the home made clay brick dug up outside the oven.



Everything gleaned from the original ovens site, we are now loaded, covered and latched down with chains and binders for the short ride back home.



One last thing was to backfill the area to leave it close to looking the same as it was...minus the vegetation. The majority of it was poison ivy anyway so it is no big loss. No trees were cut or damaged during the excavation and now its ready for Mother Nature to work on putting it back to its natural state.

Next up: The rebuild. And we'll show how much we DON'T know about what we're doing...... It's all good though. Thanks for the replys and for bearing with the tedious explanations so far.
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  #25  
Old 06-04-2014, 04:16 PM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

I'm really enjoying this....I have reclaimed hundreds of tons of stone from the woods, and this brings back good memories, and a few bad ones. Mainly the later involves hornets, poison ivy and smashed fingers.
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  #26  
Old 07-04-2014, 07:03 AM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

Anything happening with your oven?
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  #27  
Old 07-06-2014, 05:36 AM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

Thanks for the great thread and pictures so far. I grew up in Independence, MO- looking forward to seeing your rebuild pictures!
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  #28  
Old 07-06-2014, 08:40 AM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

Really enjoy seeing this and reading about your family's history. Keep us informed with
Lots of photos.
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  #29  
Old 08-06-2014, 02:47 AM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

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Originally Posted by stonecutter View Post
Anything happening with your oven?
I have to apologize for the neglect...but summertime hit and along with it came the many projects and activities that take away from fun things....



Bearing in mind that neither myself nor my brother have ever done any brickwork or stonesetting before this project, a lot of you experienced folks will probably get a good chuckle out of our non-professional approach to rebuilding of the oven.

Please bear in mind also that BEFORE I ever found this forum we were a good distance down the rebuild-road so if there are suggestions to be made, those suggestions can only be implemented on the second oven to be built on my own property next year. Please though, add any input that you feel will help us improve the design and or operation for the next one.

As a base, an 18" deep pit was dug 6'x7' and filled with limestone screenings from the local quarry. We rented a gas powered tamper and tamped each level in 2" increments from the bottom to the top then poured a 2 1/2" cap of pre-mix a little at a time and set/leveled the first course of stone in the still wet pour.



The four yellow pins were placed as the target size for the footprint of the new oven. Our plans were to include the "jetting" of meramec sand into the hollow cavity under the cooksurface which is why there is a drain pipe covered in screen wire placed in the bottom center. The thought was that excess water would slowly drain out the bottom of the firmly packed (jetted) sand.

What we were intending was to create a huge heat sink under the cook surface to absorb and hold a lot of heat for an extremely long cooking time.



In retrospect, I can see mistakes we made in the rock selection process as the base was going up....but hind sight is always 20-20 isn't it...

We tried to select stones with at least one nice squarely cut corner for the corners and tried to maintain a semblance of level while going up with the sides.



This is a wonderful example showing the dozens of chisel marks left in the stone so long ago. You can almost imagine the gaunt shape of an 1880's hard working farmer bent over with hammer and chisel in hand... Worn out bib overalls, holes in his shoes and calloused hands tapping away little by little.

This was one big mistake we made... This excellent example of the family Patriarch's handiwork should have been placed in the build to highlight these marks made so long ago instead of buried along with more mundane rocks in the ovens base.

Is four the maximum number of pictures per post ? I have plenty of pictures yet to put up, and if that is the case, this may stretch out for a while ....
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  #30  
Old 08-06-2014, 03:55 AM
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Default Re: 1880's Limestone Oven Dismantling and Rebuild in Missouri

Thanks for the update, that stone has such great character. I will mention a couple things. Don't change the way you have bedded the stone...the way it came out of the ground, is the way it should be set, especially with load bearing work like that. It would be nice to show the chisel scars, but stratified stone tends to delaminate when set on edge.

The marks were made by a toothed chisel....they are perfect for taking down high spots on stone, or dressing it for combed work. There is a type of toothed chisel called a scutch, which has a two sided blade that is fixed in the chisel head. But unless your grandfather had contact with or worked as a stonemason, it's probably a simple toothed chisel, as Scutch chisels are specialized tools for stonework.

One other tip since you are building structurally with the stone. Try to overlap your corners a bit more. A couple of the sides have joints that border on runners, and that creates a weak point. Think a bit like brick work...one over two, two over one. It's not as black and white with stone, but you get the idea.

And you should consider using rip rap or large crushed stone as infill for the next base. Sand tends to hold moisture, which is never a good thing. It looks like you did a nice good of pointing up your joints, that should reduce the amount of water that can migrate into the fill. You may see efflorescence as the fill drys out. If you do, don't use acid...use a mild soap with white vinegar. Acid will burn the limestone.

Keep the pics coming! Looks great!
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