#11  
Old 06-04-2007, 04:43 PM
ihughes's Avatar
Peasant
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 45
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

Hi Phil,
I was thinking of doing similar cuts for my bricks too so I'd be keen to see those pictures. I haven't sourced my bricks yet but the Victorian Darley bricks are one of the options. I haven't looked that hard for them in Sydney yet.

This IS a great forum. I've tried reading everything but it made my head spin. So I've found that having a general overview of where I'm going and concentrate on the specifics of where I'm up to on the construction helps me not get too overwhelmed. It probably helps if you have some building background but I've found that I've been able to find really helpful answers from previous posts and answers to my own questions. Although I still have problems converting the North American terminology with Australian (particularly as I'm a Kiwi married to a Canadian). My local hardware store looked at me oddly when I asked for rebar - they call it reo or Y12.
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  #12  
Old 06-04-2007, 06:25 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 257
Default Re: Firebricks in Sydney

Ian,

The brick company I got my red clay bricks from here in Adelaide (Salisbury Brick Company 08 8280 8060) was re-lining one of their brick kilns at the time and recommended a mob in Sydney called Thermal Ceramics for firebricks. There are a couple of companies which go by this name though, so I don't know which one they're referring to.

Just noticed a previous post where you queried alumina content vs low, medium or high duty firebrick nomenclature - my supplier sold me some imported firebricks with a 40% alumina content, which he called medium duty. In his experience, high duty firebricks are up around 80% alumina content, so it's all a bit rubbery. I don't expect any problems with the extra 10% alumina. I think Darley apply the terms low, medium and high purely to distinguish bricks in their own range - most confusing to the uninitiated!

Cheers, Paul.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2007, 06:05 AM
ihughes's Avatar
Peasant
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 45
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

Great info Paul, I'll check it out. thks
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  #14  
Old 11-18-2007, 02:26 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 297
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

Thanks James and FornoBravo: delightful site/people.

Flamin Aussies eh - there's no escaping 'em!!
Any of you blokes belong to Exploroz? I'm in Bundaberg, and have the materials for a little Pompeii oven out the back: just waiting for a skin graft to set before the oven gets revisited.
Crikey - talk about a feast of info: thanks fellers.
Jeff.
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  #15  
Old 12-03-2007, 08:35 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 297
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

Thanks James; (n' all those flamin Aussies).
So while I think the thread I'm responding to is maybe 6 months old, may I say g'day to, (random sequence),Hendo, Bacterium, Marcusjn,Maver and Phill: basically mexicans I guess,but hey, you may draw a passport in the club raffle one day.[ says the canetoad, Bundabergish.].
Hendo, I fluked Russell J's book at the library last week. HE threw the 63% rule out the window, along with a few other cautions.
So while I'll stay with the 63% ratio, I'll certainly relax re firebricks and more.Hope to be building within the week, but looking more at a New Year firing than Chrissy. Such is life.
Hey All,
Is it too early to wish you mob Good Cooking over Christmas? Hope not.
Jeff.
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  #16  
Old 12-09-2007, 05:30 PM
Neil2's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 1,374
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

"So you tapered tapered bricks? While I've got some tapered ones I plan to halve, I am still undecided whether to cut once or four times per brick. Was it worth the trouble? I like the idea but ...."

The dome curves in two planes so you will need a "beveled taper". Just start in on it. The first 3 or 4 courses you can get by with rectangular bricks. Above that you will soon start to see why you will need the beveled cuts. It's actually easier than it sounds when it's all there in front of you.

I would not cut them ahead of time (except mass cutting into 2/3, 1/2, 1/3). After that cut them as you go. Soak the bricks before cutting to save wear on your masonary blade.
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  #17  
Old 12-21-2007, 02:06 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Philippines
Posts: 19
Default Red Bricks and Insulation

No luck yet finding firebricks, so I may have to go with red bricks.

If I understand the stuff I've picked up on the forum right (this is a great forum by the way) the red bricks won't be as good with holding the heat. Can I compensate with more insulation? How much more insulation should I plan on? Is double the thickness of the insulation called for in the FB plans a reasonable thing to do?

Hoping for an answer from the collective wisdom that is out there.

Thanks,
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  #18  
Old 12-21-2007, 06:14 AM
dmun's Avatar
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 4,216
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

Red bricks will have less tendency to retain heat for baking, but their main problem is that they are not designed to withstand the constant heat cycling, and that they will crack, and spall. Spalling is the chipping off of the surface of the brick. Not a good thing when you have a pizza underneath it. Our Australian friends have had good luck with something they call "pressed reds". I don't quite know what this is because, of course, all bricks are made by pressing clay into moulds. I suspect that they are bricks fired at a higher temperature, what the English call engineering bricks, with a more glossy, rather than chalky, surface.

When you're looking for bricks, you have to go for ones without holes, of course, and that limits you right off the bat. In the states there is usually only one no-hole red brick available, which is made for paving patios and such.

Once you have your bricks chosen, you have to figure out what mortar is going to work with it in a high-heat situation. If you can't get firebrick, you probably can't get refractory mortar or fireclay.

It was said of the Phillipines that they spent five hundred years in a convent and fifty years in Hollywood, refering to the Spanish and American occupations. That American influence must have had some effect on your industrial infrastructure. Have you talked to people who use refractory products? Potters? Glassblowers? Furnace and boiler repairmen? I can't imagine an entire modern nation without refractories.

But if not, take heart. People made ovens and bread for milleniums before the invention of modern refractories. People have made workable ovens with mud and straw. Good luck with your project. Keep us informed.
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  #19  
Old 06-14-2010, 01:29 AM
cobblerdave's Avatar
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: brisbane australia
Posts: 2,494
Default Re: Red Bricks and Mortar

hi Iam Dave
and new to this forum but sounds like I about the same spot, which bricks? I'm in Brisbane so our local maker of Fire Bricks is Claypave located in Dimore (just short of Ipswich) they supply down into Nthn NSW. E-mail claypave@claypave.com Ph 07 3282144
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