Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Good Background Information > Newbie Forum

Like Tree4Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 09-27-2012, 02:57 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: california
Posts: 28
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

Just found out from Forno Bravo that Yes I do have floor insulation in my oven(ceramic).
& Yes it is dry.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-27-2012, 04:04 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: california
Posts: 28
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

thanks.
I will test again & advise.
I do know last time I did pizza the corn meal from the peel did catch fire. But the crust on the bottom did not cook very well.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-28-2012, 08:58 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Denver
Posts: 25
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

hi pizzafun
hope it works better for you.
Jusnt an FYI try to find semolina flour, not corn meal, they both look really similar, yellow and coarse, but because corn has a high sugar content ( ie corn syrup) it will caramalize then burn (fire) with a very bitter taste. I had to go to cooking school to learn that. its not obvious. The grainy stuff under pizzas at a pizzaria is almost always semolina flour. when semolina hits the stone it should carbonize but not flame up leaving a more neutral carbon taste...unfortunatley corn or semolina don't have anything to do with why your crust isn't browning quickly or evenly...but when you do get the crust perfect go with semolina ;-)
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-28-2012, 09:58 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: california
Posts: 28
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

thanks for the tip!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-28-2012, 05:42 PM
lwood's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: philippines
Posts: 642
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

You will know when you clear the dome. Just build a big fire and keep it going hot until all the black is gone. It doesn't happen all at once, a black line will move across the dome. Then test with a therm. or semolina. The black burns off at around 650 -700F. I think the semolina goes around 850F in 2 or 3 sec.
__________________
Our Facebook Page:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 09-28-2012, 10:05 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 423
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

Big fire + 2 hours = thermal success. After reading, sounds like you are not saturating the oven with heat, especially since the dome in not clearing. Do not be afraid of the fire going up the chimney - that is good. The oven can take it.
__________________
Jen-Aire 5 burner propane grill/Char Broil Smoker

Follow my build
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-29-2012, 12:31 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,789
Default Re: Oven struggles - bottom of crust terrible

Quote:
Originally Posted by C5dad View Post
Big fire + 2 hours = thermal success. After reading, sounds like you are not saturating the oven with heat, especially since the dome in not clearing. Do not be afraid of the fire going up the chimney - that is good. The oven can take it.
Sorry Chris, but I can't agree. Fire going up the chimney is wasted fuel and means that your oven chamber is overloaded. The flame should only ever be just licking out the oven door. Apart from risking damage to the flue pipe attachment, the stainless steel will discolour (minor problem), it will create more smoke (bad emissions), temp rise will be actually less because the atmosphere in the chamber will be reducing rather than oxidising (the equivalent of running an engine on an over rich fuel mixture). Finally you risk damaging the refractory because it is the 500-600 C range where there are significant delicate chemical and physical changes that take place in the refractory and temperature fluctuations exacerbate the problems creating many small cracks and maybe some bigger ones. Wood firings are notoriously difficult to control in terms of fuel regulation, don't try to see how hot you can get it unless you don't mind damaged refractory.This applies more to unsintered castable refractory than fire bricks, but also applies to mortar, which is not pre-sintered.
vtsteve likes this.

Last edited by david s; 09-29-2012 at 03:27 AM. Reason: thought of more
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wood oven bakers known as "smoke jacks" ThermoJax Firing Your Oven 5 06-18-2014 05:24 PM
Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round james Newbie Forum 50 04-01-2014 09:14 PM
Caputo 00 flour = bad crust in oven. HELP Bradley Newbie Forum 8 03-22-2012 02:43 PM
Considering build of Pompeii oven jet Pompeii Oven Construction 21 05-10-2008 12:14 AM
Why we did the Pompeii Oven james Introductions 0 03-21-2005 03:48 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:14 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC