Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Good Background Information > Newbie Forum

Like Tree7Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 05-19-2012, 08:33 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 105
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

OK back to confusion. I'm gettin conflicting information. One says it's 50/50 portland/lime, another says 2 to 1 portland/lime. I went to a couple sites but could not find any thing CONCRETE on the ratio.(LOL) It ain't easy!! So is Type N the one needed to add 3 sand, 1 fireclay?

Last edited by videts38; 05-19-2012 at 08:36 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-19-2012, 09:01 PM
Gulf's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 1,680
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Quote:
Originally Posted by videts38 View Post
OK back to confusion. I'm gettin conflicting information. One says it's 50/50 portland/lime, another says 2 to 1 portland/lime. I went to a couple sites but could not find any thing CONCRETE on the ratio.(LOL) It ain't easy!! So is Type N the one needed to add 3 sand, 1 fireclay?
Type N masonry mix: It is the general purpose most common mortar mix.
The Forno Bravo recipe is:
1 part portland
1 part hydrated lime
3 parts sand
1 part fireclay

To substitute:
2 parts Type N masonry (mortar) cement mix
3 parts sand
1 part fireclay

I hope this helps, but please do a little more searching on the web to verify, and wait until a few more chime in on the subject .
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-20-2012, 04:20 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 105
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Thanks Gulf,
I've been trying to find out what Type N and Type S are comprised of but I haven't found anything on line. I will be on the help line with sakrete and Quikrete tomorrow and hopefully I'll get a handle on it.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-20-2012, 05:18 PM
Gulf's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 1,680
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Back when I was searching for all the ingredients I did some searching and found enough on the web and this site to convince me. Searching today I find where most sites are speaking about Type N Mortar. Mortar refers to the mix after the sand has been added.
Mortar is usually made on site by the pros who supply their own sand from local sources.
Make sure, while you are talking to the Quikcrete and or Sakcrete that you are enquiring about Type N Masonry Cement. I think that you will find that Type S Masonry cement has half the lime that you need.
I hope this helps
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 05-20-2012, 05:39 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,128
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Type X mortar is a strength designation. Generally, the only difference between a Type N or Type S masonry cement is how much is in the bag. There will be no difference in WHAT is in the bag, just how much of it there is.

There are 2 ways to make a masonry cement:

A special blend of cement is produced with NO lime. It uses a different grade of clinker and the difference between a bag of N and S is 5# of material. N will weigh 70#, S will weigh 75#(+/-). When mixed with an equal amount of sand, they will each produce the designated strength.

The second way is to use Portland cement and Type S lime (the designation of lime is separate and not connected to the designation of Type S masonry cement*). In this type there is a difference in the amount of ingredients and the bag will weigh approximately the same, and each type, when mixed with the appropriate amount of sand will make the designated strength mortar.

Both work equally well, and to find out if it is a portland/lime masonry mix or a masonry cement mix, you can check the product data sheet.

*Type S lime is a double hydrated lime, and is ready for use in mortar, unlike "normal", "shit-house" or agricultural lime which must be slaked.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 05-20-2012, 07:19 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 105
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Thanks Tscarborough and Gulf,
All this info is great and very useful, and much appreciated.
Now if I can only find some double hydrated lime locally.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 05-20-2012, 07:36 PM
deejayoh's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,398
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

I sympathize with your search. My local box stores don't carry lime either.

I finally found it at the local concrete monopoly( well, at least it seems like they are a monopoly based on truck count). Anyway, they have a small storefront that is only open during impossibly inconvenient hours that sells concrete finishing supplies, tools, etc. I asked at the front desk and they had lime and cement in 5/10/20 pound bags. For me, it's really been a great way to go. For around $5 I get 10 lbs cement and 5 lbs lime. Perfect. I am sure it is more expensive by the unit, but I really don't want 80 lbs of this crap hanging around when I am done!

So have you checked all the concrete suppliers? I would think somebody has to be serving the masonry trade.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 05-21-2012, 07:58 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 105
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Well, took care of the hydrated lime. Ordered it online unfortunately, but didn't want to chance a bad ingredient in the mortar. Called Sakrete and Quikrete and neither would devulge the percentage of portland or lime in the Type N or S masonry cement or mortar.
Anyway onward!
I'm headed out to buy the foundatiion materials this week. Since I'm kinda confined in the back yard I'll be mixing my own. Bought a used mixer for some help! Does anybody know the better material to use...the high strength cement (5000) or the crack resistant cement. The CRC is a little extra $$ but is it worth the money? I did save some $ on the stand blocks, I was able to score some used older blocks. There not as pretty as new ones but the price is right and I figure for the most part they will not be exposed.
Thanks for the help so far. Alot have helped more than they know with their posts on their builds.
LOTS OF READING AND LOTS OF THINKING!!

Last edited by videts38; 05-21-2012 at 08:02 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 05-21-2012, 08:23 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Kingstree, SC
Posts: 10
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

Have you found the ingredients for homebrew? Please advise me if you are having difficulty. I will be glad to help a fellow South Carolinian.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 05-22-2012, 04:42 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 105
Default Re: Oven Build in SC

I found Type S lime online and was going to order it from there. I'm in the upstate and could not locate it anywhere.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oven Curing james Firing Your Oven 335 07-15-2014 08:12 PM
Preparing for steel oven build. scarnucci Other Oven Types 31 07-06-2014 12:39 PM
Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round james Newbie Forum 50 04-01-2014 10:14 PM
New 40" oven build in Central MN goodnerbaker Introductions 4 09-08-2010 06:28 AM
All things being equal Lester Newbie Forum 13 12-21-2009 02:26 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:36 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC