#11  
Old 06-01-2010, 11:48 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston
Posts: 192
Default Re: Lessons learned

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billz View Post
"Just make sure to soak your bricks in water throughly for a couple of hours before cutting"

If you did this wouldn't you have to let them almost dry out before you set them. I thought I read here somewhere that if you over wet the bricks you would weaken the bond when setting?
No you will not weaken the bond, in fact from what all of the instructions I have seen warns you to soak the brick to keep drawing out the moisture from the fire brick to much thus weakening the bond.
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2010, 12:20 PM
Raffy's Avatar
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Philippines
Posts: 213
Default Re: Lessons learned

Gosh, where do I start? Building an oven teaches you a lot of stuff but before I start getting philosophical, let me begin my list with:

1. PROPER SAFETY WHILE HANDLING CONCRETE. ALWAYS WEAR PROTECTION (i.e. latex gloves)

My hands have never returned to normal since handling concrete without any protection. Now, everytime I shower or even when I just wash my hands, they immediately turn pruny even if its just for a moment. I'm assuming it is a result of alkaline (caustic) skin burns to my hands due to handling concrete unprotected. You never notice any effects to your skin but definitely there is damage being done microscopically. PH level of concrete is roughly 12 to 13. Even when I realized early on to wear latex gloves, the damage had been done but hopefully its not permanent. Someone taught me to rinse my hands in a mixture of vinegar diluted in water to wash off any cement.

I'll edit this reply as I remember other important lessons I've learned while building my oven.
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Last edited by Raffy; 06-01-2010 at 12:32 PM.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2010, 03:51 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston
Posts: 192
Default Re: Lessons learned

Ok some more leasons learned here.

1. Someone else mentioned this somewhere else, but I will also bring it up here. If you are using the HF wet saw, put the pump in a 5 gal bucket. This will help the pump from sucking up the brick clay that you get, AND YOU GET ALOT!.
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  #14  
Old 06-05-2010, 03:54 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston
Posts: 192
Default Re: Lessons learned

Major leason learned here. Watch out if you get too much help with the oven. This is the result!
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  #15  
Old 06-05-2010, 09:25 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,833
Default Re: Lessons learned

Make sure you use a dust mask, preferably a respirator when cutting bricks. Inhaling the dust from fired bricks is dangerous.
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  #16  
Old 06-07-2010, 02:17 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston
Posts: 192
Default Re: Lessons learned

In a number of instructions it does state that you will have at least one keystone in each chain and you should plan on installing it near the front of the oven so that it will more or less out of sight.
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE of making this the brick that interfaces the chain with the front entry! I know one jerk that did that and it is much more difficult to fabricate!
What you wan't your keystone to be is exactly that, a keystone! it could be either large or small, what you don't want is an odd shaped keystone with multipule angles.
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  #17  
Old 07-04-2010, 08:31 PM
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Location: Houston
Posts: 192
Default Re: Lessons learned

Ok hopefully others will learn from this one. Putting a layer of plastic on your floor to help keep it clean does not work! I finally bit the bullet and removed the plastic my indespensable tool and cleaned up my floor. I then cut some luan and put that on the floor and re-mounted the tool on the wood. This should keep the floor cleaner.
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  #18  
Old 10-18-2010, 02:40 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston
Posts: 192
Default Re: Lessons learned

Ok its been awhile since I posted here. I was very smug and proud of how much I spent on my indispensable tool. The only problem with it is now it really doesn't work. The lazy susan is very difficult to turn and the small hinge screws are not holding very well in the 2x2.
The trouble it seems is not necessarly the design but more of a factor on how long it is taking me to build this oven.
For all you newbies, the oven is taking me so long due to the time I devote to it. Only on Saturdays and until reciently only every other Saturday and not because the oven is complicated.
Soooo the lesson learned here I guess would be if you are going to build your pizza oven in the same amount of time it took to build the Domo in Florance, don't use my design for the indespensable tool.

Gary
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