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-   -   Hearth pour (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f2/hearth-pour-9609.html)

ikhan42 12-26-2009 12:46 PM

Hearth pour
 
Hi guys,

Well I am about to lay the foundation soon as the weather clears up and the suppliers are open again.

Anyways I am thinking ahead re the hearth and had an idea I thought I would ask opinions on or if anyone else has tried it.

Well I am using the 8inch cement blocks like everyone else for the stand but I was thinking rather then forming up the hearth frame with wood, that I would use the 4inch wide cement blocks as the form work. Ie lay a row of the 4 inch wide blocks to stop the cement from pouring out the sides and these blocks will become part of the wall.

Has anyone else tried this or have any comments on it.

Thanks
ikhan42

Johnny the oven man 12-26-2009 03:26 PM

Re: Hearth pour
 
Check your PM's

david s 12-26-2009 03:34 PM

Re: Hearth pour
 
I didn't know Kevin Rudd was building an oven. That's big news.

ikhan42 12-26-2009 04:49 PM

Re: Hearth pour
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by david s (Post 75330)
I didn't know Kevin Rudd was building an oven. That's big news.

LOL yeah our PM is a busy man does everything but run the country. Hey hes a politician after all.

Thanks johnny but I am in sydney and the shipping would make it an expensive exercise from melbourne.

Any comments on my idea though. I figure I am using the bricks anyways so why buy wood that I will end up ditching. The slab would still be sitting on 4 inches of concrete blocks on all sides and will also be resting on Bondek so hopefully weight distribution wouldnt be a problem.

The way I figure if the scotts oven relies on reinfocement bars to suspend their oven on teh concrete briks and its a heavier oven then what I am proposing shouldnt be an issue. But would like the engineering type to maybe give some input.

thanks again
ikhan42

Johnny the oven man 12-26-2009 04:56 PM

Re: Hearth pour
 
I would think it should be ok, make sure the ovens weight is over the blocks not suspended on just the slab. For Sydney supply see Andrew at Field Furnace Refractories in Wetherill Park.

ikhan42 12-26-2009 06:24 PM

Re: Hearth pour
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Johnny the oven man (Post 75337)
I would think it should be ok, make sure the ovens weight is over the blocks not suspended on just the slab. For Sydney supply see Andrew at Field Furnace Refractories in Wetherill Park.

Johnny,

I have been emailing Andrew from field furnace as they have all the stuff in one place, I will definately be having the hearth slab resting on the concrete bricks I cant see how the scotts oven with the floor as it is in the Alans book is a secure or sturdy oven the engineering doesnt make sence to me.

Does anyone know anyone on this forum who has done what I am proposing so I could talk to them about pitfalls.

thanks
ikhan42

Tscarborough 12-26-2009 06:54 PM

Re: Hearth pour
 
Sure you can. I am going to use 4x4x16 block (sitting on 6x8x16 CMU) as a form on 2 sides of mine.

jota112233 12-31-2009 08:29 AM

Re: Hearth pour
 
Hi
I was thinking the very same myself, but with two or three courses of engineering brick. then bringing the hearth slab up to the level of the top brick. i plan on building an enclosure, the same dimensions at the base for the verniculite, so the red bricks showing around the edges won't show from the top, if that makes sense. Building a wooden form for the hearth slab, does seem a lot of unnecesssary expense, to my mind.

Ikhan - you go first!

Jon
Cardiff
UK

dmun 12-31-2009 08:37 AM

Re: Hearth pour
 
Quote:

I will definitely be having the hearth slab resting on the concrete bricks I cant see how the scotts oven with the floor as it is in the Alans book is a secure or sturdy oven the engineering doesn't make sense to me.
Nor to anybody else. Having the support slab hung from a few pieces of exposed rebar is bad on so many levels that I'm surprised that anybody thought of it in the first place. I suppose the original idea was with the insulation below the support slab (?) that it helped keep the slab hot, as if the rebar pins didn't act as a thermal bridge...


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