#11  
Old 12-06-2011, 09:39 AM
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Default Re: design decisions

Looks pretty far away from the kitchen.
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  #12  
Old 12-06-2011, 09:59 AM
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Default Re: design decisions

The ramp to the landing deck is about 25' from the back door of the house. Unless I build it right at the back door, this is about as good as it will get.

My kitchen is so small I tend to do a lot of prep work outside when I use my green egg.

This landing deck/oven might end up covered, and would certainly have a lot of prep area.
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:33 PM
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Default Re: design decisions

Ovens can be pretty heavy. Do a calculation of the final weight to ensure that your deck has sufficient support. I think you should make the oven small, as any increase in diameter has a dramatical increase in volume and therefore weight. Eg my oven weighs 250Kgs not including the stand. It is 21" internal diam. That is equivalent to three big blokes standing together having a drink on the deck. Probably quite adequate, but if you tripled the load, then it probably isn't.
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  #14  
Old 12-06-2011, 02:08 PM
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Default Re: design decisions

Thanks. I wouldn't be putting the oven on the deck, I would be putting it adjacent to the deck on it's own pilings. I will look into how many pilings it will take to hold the load, I plan to use 6x6 posts.
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  #15  
Old 12-06-2011, 03:52 PM
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Default Re: design decisions

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedzap View Post
Thanks. I wouldn't be putting the oven on the deck, I would be putting it adjacent to the deck on it's own pilings. I will look into how many pilings it will take to hold the load, I plan to use 6x6 posts.
Sorry, I didn't read your post carefully enough. Cement blocks should be cheaper and more suitable IMO. Timber has a tendency to move, creating problems in the oven structure.
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  #16  
Old 12-06-2011, 06:29 PM
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Default Re: design decisions

Building ovens on any wooden support structure is discouraged. Wood is flexible, sonotube footings move with frost heave, whereas ovens are heavy and rigid.
The most rigid support has the best chance of success.
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  #17  
Old 12-07-2011, 10:39 AM
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Default Re: design decisions

Thanks for the input. I have been surfing around a bit and in general post and pier construction seems to be discouraged. I did find this site, but there isn't any real feedback about how it worked out in the long run. Wood-fired pizza oven

Does the fact that he has a post/slab/block/hearth arrangement (instead of just post/hearth) help to create a solid base for the oven?
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  #18  
Old 12-07-2011, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: design decisions

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedzap View Post
Thanks for the input. I have been surfing around a bit and in general post and pier construction seems to be discouraged. I did find this site, but there isn't any real feedback about how it worked out in the long run. Wood-fired pizza oven

Does the fact that he has a post/slab/block/hearth arrangement (instead of just post/hearth) help to create a solid base for the oven?
Yes i guess it would, but it also adds enormously to the weight on each post which in turn encourages one or more of them to move, creating stresses. I still think masonary blocks with standard footings would be a superior and cheaper solution.
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  #19  
Old 12-09-2011, 11:56 AM
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Default Re: design decisions

"Here is my question, has anyone built a base using "pier and post" construction methods? "

Concrete piers are a very practical solution. See the following thread;


http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f21/...ucer-3033.html (Flying Saucer)

also check out Georges's (fxpose) build thread here;

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f21/...ome-12677.html (My 3-Legged Dome)
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