#11  
Old 02-16-2008, 06:20 AM
Journeyman
 
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Location: Fethiye Turkey
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

An update on the trials.........................

The Italian seed has now arrived in Turkey. I have had no luck persuading a local grower to foster my plants. As they are commercial growers and can't sell the product they are loath to give over space. I am now considering buying a greenhouse. It will come in handy to grow on some of my more exotic plant and veg seed.

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Size of San Marzano crop-tomato-seed-001.jpg  
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  #12  
Old 02-16-2008, 10:33 AM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

Maybe you can build a low budget greenhouse?
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  #13  
Old 02-16-2008, 11:00 AM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

Inishta,

Though I've never done it myself, I've seen successful small greenhouses made from unmortared, stacked cinderblocks, covered with recycled storm windows (the kind that are put up in the fall and taken down in summer in colder climates). They're really simple and basic.

Jim
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Old 02-16-2008, 05:40 PM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

.... or even an inexpensive cold frame type green house. I suspect the climate in Turkey would be excellent for San Marzano tomatoes.
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  #15  
Old 02-17-2008, 01:24 AM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

Around here you often see crops covered with clear plastic draped over hoops - looks really easy to do, so might be an idea?

Just asking, but why do the tomatoes need a greenhouse anyway? We plant ours in the garden and they come along fine... I'm thinking Turkey would be a lot warmer and they should grow like mad.
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  #16  
Old 02-21-2008, 07:49 AM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

Hi folks..............thanks for the input. I'm not considering a massive investment. As Frances says, clear plastic over hoops is a good option.

Size of San Marzano crop-greenhouses-001.jpg

These are the cheapo version but are only 1 metre/yard high.

This is a serious bank of greenhouses complete with state of the art heating that belongs to one of my neighbours.

Size of San Marzano crop-greenhouses-003.jpg

Something a bit more modest would suit me perfectly. Perhaps a single unit.

Frances, there are a couple of reasons I would like to have a greenhouse. The tomatoes do not need one but it would provide San Marzano toms and herbs 12 months a year. Also as a comparative exercise all the four varieties will receive exactly the same treatment. Some of my friends will be getting tomato plants to grow outside and we can compare the results. Also in winter, although we seldom get very low temps, we have mountains on three sides and the Med in front and can suffer from ground frosts that can stay till afternoon. Some of my plants, like the double bougainvilleas, are susceptible and can easily die. By planting in pots I shall be able to over-winter them in the greenhouse.

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  #17  
Old 06-29-2008, 06:00 PM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

Supposedly some of the great taste of S. Marzano tomatoes comes not only from the variety and climate, but also the volcanic soil where they are grown.

I am growing some San Marzano tomatoes in my garden this year so I can compare to the canned tomatoes (and put this wisdom to the test) but so far the weather has not been so cooperative - It's been a very rainy June. Hopefully it will dry out soon.
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  #18  
Old 06-29-2008, 06:45 PM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

They say the soil has a lot to do with it. I also think it has to do with how they train and pick the plants. I have been told (I really need to see this up close and personal) that the plants are hand trained and hand picked -- when the tomatoes are actually red. :-)

Image making a Caprese salad (tomatoes, mozzarella, olive oil and fresh basil) using the tomatoes machine picked where half of them are still green. Yuck.

For that matter, imagine a Caprese salad with bad supermarket tomatoes, string cheese, corn oil and dried basil. It just isn't the same. Who says ingredients don't matter. :-)
James
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Old 06-29-2008, 07:07 PM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

I have family friends that live in Torre Del Greco (Napoli) which is not far from the San Marzano town where they grow the authentic tomatoes. If its one thing i know the soil plays a massive part as volcanic soil is one of the best in the world if not the best.

Its like when people import stuff from italy then make it here and it doesnt taste the same they always scratch their head and think why? everything plays a part from climate, water, soil, handling etc...
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  #20  
Old 08-04-2008, 09:43 PM
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Default Re: Size of San Marzano crop

Just my 2 cents, but over here in the states according to "Americas Test Kitchen" the San Marzano canned tomatoes we have access to here are inferior to a couple US produced brands. According to "Americas Test Kitchen" the reason for this is due to some dumb trade rules that have to due with import taxes the Italians have to pack the tomatoes in puree to avoid this tax, which basically ruins the flavor. The brand they recommend is something called Full Red or Red Pack something like that. Just thought it was interesting. Personally my opinion based on being someone who has been a grower as a hobby since I was 10 is that the best tomatoes no matter what strain are the ones you grow in your own garden.
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