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  #21  
Old 02-16-2014, 10:06 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Bergen NH - Netherlands
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

Quote:
Originally Posted by dimitrisbizakis View Post
Now to the question, if I burn my oven longer, would I get longer maintain of a temp or this is a thermal mass problem?
Yes, I would think you need to burn your oven longer. I can not imagine that if you have an oven that has enough thermal mass to bake pizza's and breads etc, that you will have it at the right temperature after 1 hour of burning.

To get you a better answer, how thick are your bricks ? How hot is the oven when you bake pizza ? How much insulation did you use ? What kind of door (insulated or not) are you using ? etc. etc.

Mine is >350 celsius when I bake pizza and it takes to the next day before it has dropped to roughly 220. You talk about baking pizza and apperantly not to long later you are allready at bread temperature..... Completely different from my oven. (4inch thick, 3 inch superwool insulation, me firing it up for 3 hours and then baking pizza for 2 hours with a life fire)
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  #22  
Old 02-16-2014, 12:33 PM
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

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Originally Posted by nachtwacht View Post
You talk about baking pizza and apperantly not to long later you are allready at bread temperature..... Completely different from my oven. (4inch thick, 3 inch superwool insulation, me firing it up for 3 hours and then baking pizza for 2 hours with a life fire)
My dome is 10 cm thick, i have 10cm ceramic blanket and under the hearth ,which is 5 cm thick firebrick, i have 30 cm of perlcrete.
My door is 2 layers of ceramic blanket on a stainless steel box with a wood facing.

I don't bake my pizzas at super high temps.
I start from a cold oven and i maintain a medium fire for an hour or so.
With the live fire of one log in i can bake 3 pizzas at 260c without even the need to recharge the floor.
After i'm done with the pizza's i spread the coals (without any ash) to the floor.After half an hour i remove the coals, close the door and let it equalize. At that point i usually get a 280c temp.
After a half an hour it drops at 260c, perhaps the oven is still soaking heat and equalizing some points that are heated lower than some others.

If i fire my oven for more than i usually do, when i'm done with the pizza's i'll have to wait too long for the temp to drop so i could load the bread.
I guess i can't make everything works as i like too!

Pardon my english,self taught here
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  #23  
Old 02-16-2014, 03:28 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Bergen NH - Netherlands
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

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Originally Posted by dimitrisbizakis View Post
After a half an hour it drops at 260c, perhaps the oven is still soaking heat and equalizing some points that are heated lower than some others.
Sounds to me like this is indeed happening.

Our ovens are roughly very simular (Mine is 11cm, also 5cm on the floor and insulation is about the same) but the outside of my stones is a lot lower in temperature than the inside after 1 hour of fire. (I can mesure the temperature on the inside but also the outside and below my floor) This means your oven is still equalizing so it looses temperature to the "outside" aswell as some through the inside.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dimitrisbizakis View Post
If i fire my oven for more than i usually do, when i'm done with the pizza's i'll have to wait too long for the temp to drop so i could load the bread.
It's one or the other indeed. For your oven to work as good as possible at constant temperature, your oven has to be saturated as much as possible. That can be at 220 aswell as 350 degrees though.

You might try having a small fire before you start your big fire. Let this small fire burn for... lets say 3 or 4 hours.... This will get your oven to a nice hot temperature and probably also nicely soaked all the way through. Then you heat it up for pizza (this will now take a shorter time because it is allready nicely warm) and then let it cool down a little again (this will however now be slower because the heat is not soaking in like usualy anymore) I would think this would give you better retained heat for baking your bread.

Also possible, why not use a fire while baking bread.... I recently seen a tv show (the fabulous baker brothers) wich used a stone oven (same size as we use) in their bakery. I was suprised they were baking breads and other things while still having a fire in the oven. If they can do it, why cant we

gl
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  #24  
Old 02-17-2014, 02:08 AM
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

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Originally Posted by nachtwacht View Post
Also possible, why not use a fire while baking bread.... I recently seen a tv show (the fabulous baker brothers) wich used a stone oven (same size as we use) in their bakery. I was suprised they were baking breads and other things while still having a fire in the oven. If they can do it, why cant we
gl
Moisture is a big plus at bread baking and I don't know how well will it work, when you say fire, you mean a live fire or live coals?I guess they don't close the door and there wood must be really dry because ever a little moister in wood can give a very awful smell to bread.
I.ll try to find more about this episode you are referring.
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  #25  
Old 02-17-2014, 02:18 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Bergen NH - Netherlands
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

This is one of the examples. It realy is a life fire

Classic Chip Butty Recipe With Fresh Bread - The Fabulous Baking Brothers - YouTube

There are several episodes where they bake like this.
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  #26  
Old 02-17-2014, 01:06 PM
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

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Originally Posted by nachtwacht View Post
This is one of the examples. It realy is a life fire

Classic Chip Butty Recipe With Fresh Bread - The Fabulous Baking Brothers - YouTube

There are several episodes where they bake like this.
Have you ever try that?
It seems that with a live fire I can get it as low as 260 but it can get realy hot in there, I guess he has his eyes on and I think it's good for 1-2 loafs only.
And the tin...I realy like the baking to the floor.
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  #27  
Old 02-17-2014, 01:41 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Bergen NH - Netherlands
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Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

I have tried it but only with ciabatta. Can not realy compare that to this kind of baking... the ciabatta's where only in the oven for a few minutes. I still have to (and want to) try the way he baked it but I usualy give big pizza party's and my oven is plenty hot the next day.

He also bakes on the floor, this is just one of the examples. I can only imagine he will put the bread in a corner, as far away from the fire as possible. If you put it close to the fire, it will ofcourse burn. Your oven therefore has to be big enough so you can move the fire to the left and bake on the right... I don't see why you should not be able to get the oven to 220 degrees and keep it there using a small fire adding wood if needed... It just does not seem to be something people do very often. This was actualy the first time I ever seen it in this video series. He does not only bake bread but also pies and a lot of other things this way.

Just give it a try I would say and for starters, keep the fire as small as possible or start with coals and take it from there. If the temp drops to much, you can add a small piece of wood....

Just make sure to let us know how it goes
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