Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Oven Management > Heat Management

Like Tree1Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 10-04-2013, 12:33 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,732
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polo View Post
LOL.........Can you say P-R-O-P-A-G-A-N-D-A

To be fair, I would say that the Pompeii is defintely going to heat up much faster, but 45 minutes is wishful thinking at its best.
Yeah, "heat up", but to what degree? Certainly not enough to cook a pizza properly.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-04-2013, 07:12 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Michigan
Posts: 90
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

My experience is similar to what others have indicated, about two hours for my 42 inch with 4 1/2 inch walls. Maybe a little less once with a wicked big fire, but then it seemed to pant and puff smoke out the front so I don't burn it that wild. It certainly isn't saturated in 2 hours but retains enough heat to cook several pies. One of these days when I get the thermocouples hooked up I'll provide some more detailed results.
__________________
John


Link to my build:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by jbruning; 10-04-2013 at 07:17 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-07-2013, 04:54 AM
hodgey1's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: NW Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 287
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristics

Quote:
Originally Posted by hodgey1 View Post
Hello All,

I completed the brick portion of my 42" WFO project about a month ago and have been using it regularly. The oven is working great, the floor and dome are heating up and staying hot nicely. I am firing my oven with seasoned hardwood "Cherry-Oak-Maple" from where I live in NW Pennsylvania and using the techniques described here and in the book "The Art of Wood Fired Cooking".

I thought I'd read along the way that the Pompeii ovens should be ready to cook pizza in 45 minutes, which would be really nice. From cold, my oven is taking around 90 to 120 minutes to clear dome, walls and have floor up to 750*. I'm able to turn out 10 pies before my floor drops below 650*.

While 1 1/2 - 2 hours isn't awful, I sure would prefer 45min. I'm not complaining because it is working great and turning out some beautiful pies. I'm more curious of what other peoples experiences are with their back yard builds that used medium duty fire bricks and the higher dome construction. My dome is 21" high with a arched inner opening is 12" at it's highest. Please respond if you would with the following in addition to any comments you may have.

. Size of WFO
. heat up time
. Your pizza cooking temps
. how often you have to recharge the floor when cooking multiple pies

Thanks,
Chris
It would seem from all the replies here that a 90 to 120 minute heat-up time for a oven is about the norm. Saturday night I cooked twelve 2 - 3 minute pies with a nice live fire. I started with a floor temp of 750* after 2 hr preheat, an 1 1/2hrs later and 10+ pies the floor had dropped down below 600* and needed recharged. Should have I preheated longer or just recharge once the floor temp started to dip?

If people could, please comment on their particular recharging of their oven floors during large events and cooking multiple pies in a row.

Chris
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-07-2013, 05:13 AM
stonecutter's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: South Carolina,USA
Posts: 1,860
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

If you waited a little longer during heat up, the oven will quickly recharge the floor, with a steady flame from a bed of coals. Moving pizza to different spots helps too.

That is the benefit of heating your oven longer before using it. There is more heat stored in the mass, and a steady fire will automatically recharge the floor. A saturated oven is better for oven management during use. And you won't have to shovel coals around and work harder to keep things even.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Current WFO build -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-07-2013, 09:46 AM
deejayoh's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,330
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

If I am cooking a lot of pies I will move the banked fire from once side to the other at some point. Then I can cook where the fire was and the other side gets heated. Seems to work fine and takes 2 minutes.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-11-2013, 11:50 AM
hodgey1's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: NW Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 287
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
I can cook a pizza or 2 in mine in 45 minutes but it really needs a couple of hours for multiple pizzas
Tscar,
Can you describe a little more your method of firing the oven if your intensions are to just cook one or two pies. Can you just partial heat the oven with sucess if you are just wanting to do a small quanity? That would be awesome, because up untill now I've been cooking for the masses and now would like to do a mid-week pie for just my wife and I.

Thanks,
Chris
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-11-2013, 02:00 PM
brickie in oz's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Whittlesea
Posts: 3,455
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

Quote:
Originally Posted by hodgey1 View Post
Can you just partial heat the oven with sucess if you are just wanting to do a small quanity?
Now theres an interesting idea.

A split oven with a removable partition so you can reduce the oven size when needed.
__________________
The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-11-2013, 03:14 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Arkansas river valley
Posts: 137
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

If it were me, I'd try raking out the coals across the floor for 20 mins. or so with the door closed. Then adding some wood to bring some flame up for pizza. I might also consider the "dryness" of the fire wood. Mine heats up faster with wood that I have stored in the oven after the last use...still warm, no coals..Tinder dry ...poof!
__________________
" Life is art, live a masterpiece"
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-11-2013, 04:49 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Australia
Posts: 558
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

By building a "fast" fire using thin sticks (1 inch or less in diameter) I regularly get my thin dome cleared in less than an hour, usually 45-50 minutes from when I light the match, for mid-week pizzas. It is nowhere near fully saturated, it runs out of heat after 4 or 5 pizzas. To cook for a crowd I use a slower fire and let it go for at least 1.5 hours while I enjoy the social side. Seems to me that with the "fast" fire, I am applying heat quicker than the bricks can absorb it, so only the surface is up to temperature.
david s likes this.

Last edited by wotavidone; 10-11-2013 at 04:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-16-2014, 09:46 AM
dimitrisbizakis's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Greece
Posts: 132
Default Re: Typical heat up characteristic

Hi everyone, may I ask what temp is the coocking temp?The temp that the oven has before you put your food in or after the temp drop?I am asking that because I get a roughly 15 degree temp drop whene I put a batch of 5 kg bread in.
I heat the oven for 1hour, I bake 3 pizzas in 30 min, spead the coals and leave it for 15 min, remove the coals and close the door to equalize, usaly at 250c.
When I load the batch the temp drops from 250 to 210, after an hour I remove the bread and close again the door, now it's at 200 now I put 40 cookies in and heat drops to 190, after an hour the I remove the cookies and after 20 min it's 185c.
I think the mass of my oven can hold a specific temp at say 210 c for an hour.
Now to the question, if I burn my oven longer, would I get longer maintain of a temp or this is a thermal mass problem?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Maximizing heat from your outdoor fireplace caspian Outdoor Fireplace Design 0 09-30-2013 10:02 AM
Heat transfer metrics - under door heat loss SCChris Pompeii Oven Construction 14 04-10-2011 12:06 PM
Holding High Heat james Newbie Forum 10 12-22-2010 07:05 PM
Casa 2G Typical Heat Up Time to 700+F ? d0rifto Newbie Forum 0 04-26-2010 12:27 AM
Heat put off by indoor stove Mr Salami Newbie Forum 1 02-15-2010 09:49 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC