#91  
Old 05-29-2008, 09:20 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

Does having a higher-duty brick in the floor make/keep it hotter? I know the insulation must be there, but will this make a difference if great pizza crust is my main goal?
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  #92  
Old 05-30-2008, 07:31 AM
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

No. It's not worth the expense and difficulty of cutting. At pizza temperatures low duty is the way to go. Now if you were building a blast furnace...

If you have the high duty or can get them cheap, there is no problem with using them, but they are not worth searching out.
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  #93  
Old 05-30-2008, 09:20 AM
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frances View Post
Thanks Jim... that's just the kind of advice I think I can follow. I will add one piece of old squared wood to my Pizza baking equipment.
Won't that catch on fire after a few uses? Sounds like a pretty expensive way of building a fire. :-)
James
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  #94  
Old 05-30-2008, 11:50 AM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

If I'm setting the dome on the floor, wouldn't there be no cutting of the floor, except at the entrance? In what way is it harder to cut? I've never cut any firebrick, so I guess I have no frame of reference. Finally, how much more expensive? I'll take your word for it that it's not worth it, but in my quest to learn more about this subject, I now must know these answers!
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  #95  
Old 05-30-2008, 12:22 PM
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

High duty fire brick is denser and harder. It cuts slower, but it cuts. If you are setting your dome on the floor, which I like, you should cut your bricks that stick out a lot, so they are within the insulation envelope.

A hint for cutting hard materials, which I learned too late, augment that wimpy stream from the pump with a spray from the hose. It prevents the blade from grabbing, shimmying and bucking.

On a good saw, low duty firebrick cuts like balsawood. It's the easiest masonry item to cut.

Again, if you want to use high duty firebrick, go right ahead. Report back. We stand to learn something.

It's been a while since I've been shopping but ordinary fireplace bricks can be had from a masonry supply for about a buck a piece. High duty bricks are a refractory special item, and could cost you 3 bucks plus, and might not be available locally.

Last edited by dmun; 05-30-2008 at 12:25 PM.
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  #96  
Old 05-30-2008, 07:37 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

Three times the cost is reason enough for me.

In reference to medium/high duty brick: Would it keep the floor hotter, thereby making a better floor for pizza cooking, or just hold more heat for a longer period (btu vs. temperature), all other things being equal? Sounds like for our purposes there is no appreciable difference.
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  #97  
Old 05-31-2008, 01:38 AM
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

From what I think I read on the forum (really decisive information here), high duty fire bricks can make the floor too hot for pizza.

James, I'll let you know how my new high tech tool works out...
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  #98  
Old 05-31-2008, 02:12 PM
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frances View Post
From what I think I read on the forum (really decisive information here), high duty fire bricks can make the floor too hot for pizza.

James, I'll let you know how my new high tech tool works out...
Its much easier to cool down an oven then to heat it up, In my opinion if your going to spend a decent amount of time and money in building a custom oven then why not go for the best you can afford?
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  #99  
Old 05-31-2008, 07:56 PM
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Default Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

Cuda,
I kind of like your idea about the high duty firebrick floor. I strongly support laying the floor bricks on their sides for a little extra mass to maintain a hot floor while cooking.
I haven't looked at the properties of low duty v. high duty bricks. There's probably information on the web describing the heating and cooling curves of the two brick types. You will expend a bit more fuel to get the oven to pizza temps but my guess (and I mean guess) is that with HD bricks, the floor will definitely cool much slower.
A review of many of our ovens performance's show that there are many bricks available across the country, or around the world, that result in drastic differences in heating and cooling times. I suspect that this is due to the use of the different types of bricks, and less so, on the insulation surrounding the oven. Pretty much everyone seems to follow those guidlines, or at least should.
Regarding the ease of cutting issue, if you're only going to use them on the floor, there will not be that many cuts anyway. I used a HF saw to cut standard masonry bricks for my decorative arch. Brutal! Much much harder than firebrick. Slow, loud, slow slow slow going..... but an hour's work (max) should get you through all the cuts you need for a floor (again - a guess).
Hope that helps. Just my stinky opinion.
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  #100  
Old 05-31-2008, 09:59 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Driving heat across the cooking floor

Hi Cuda,
Take Dmun's advice with regards to cutting the high temp fire bricks. In the 200 odd second hand fire bricks that I got for my oven, there were around 6-8 high temp bricks amoungst them. I was thinking of using them for my first course of soldier bricks until I cut the first one, No exaggeration, the 14" diamond saw (proper brick cutting saw with a brand new diamond blade) was like cutting a slab of steel. It took up to 10 times the effort to cut the 15˚ required to set the second chord on the correct angle thus reducing the mortar joint thickness. Don't even try cutting them with anything less than one of these saws. The brick are also around 1.5 to 2X as heavy as the low or medium bricks.

Neill
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