Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/)
-   Firing Your Oven (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f16/)
-   -   Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f16/re-welcome-new-forno-bravo-forum-6035.html)

Jeanne 01-30-2009 01:32 PM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
I am having an issue with my new pizza oven which is in my kitchen. After I fire it the next day I get a lot of black soot from the flue that falls all over the floor. What can be done for this. It is really a mess the next day. When I put a new log on the fire (I am using very seasoned hard wood) I get smoke back into the room. My builder actually installed a exast fan on the end of the flue outside which I keep on high. Also my oven does not get totally white inside after 2 hours of heating. The pizza are cooking great though.

Hope you can help

Jeanne

tschaefges 01-30-2009 02:38 PM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
Our oven is in the kitchen, too. Have you tried cracking a window open when you're firing the oven? I've found that helps get the draft going to carry the smoke out the chimney. If I don't open a window we'll sometimes get smoke back into the room.

dmun 01-30-2009 03:14 PM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
Wow: an exhaust fan on high and you still get smoke in the house? You must have a air balance problem, a lack of combustion air. Modern houses are sometimes too tightly sealed to use open fireplaces like a WFO, and need an additional air intake. As Tschaefges says, an open window can test this theory, if that solves the problem you need an air intake. Rumford.com suggests putting the air intake behind the refrigerator, that way you don't have light leaks, and the air is pre-heated by the refrigerator coils to avoid drafts. Like your flue, your air intake should be able to be closed, to avoid loosing your indoor heat when you aren't firing your oven.

Jed 01-30-2009 05:01 PM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeanne (Post 50033)
Also my oven does not get totally white inside after 2 hours of heating. The pizza are cooking great though.

Hope you can help

Jeanne

Hi Jeanne,

How many times have you fired your oven?

It takes awhile to 'season' the masonry; ie. drive the moisture from the masonry. If the masonry is still new, it is really difficult to get the oven white hot.

And if you have been using the oven a bunch, then you need to build a bigger fire, get more air moving through the oven. You should be able to get the brick to turn white, indicating they are appropriately hot.

JED

david s 01-30-2009 05:08 PM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
New ovens tend to smoke as well as using more fuel. I'm sure you will find that it just gets better and better the more you fire it. Try not to overload the chamber,this is another cause of smoking.

Jeanne 01-30-2009 06:54 PM

Black soot from the flue
 
After Ifire my oven the next morning I hav a ton of black soot on my floor that come from the flue. what can be done.

Les 01-30-2009 08:00 PM

Re: Black soot from the flue
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeanne (Post 50053)
After Ifire my oven the next morning I hav a ton of black soot on my floor that come from the flue. what can be done.

Is it possible for you to set the door (if you have one) at the entry? You still have to deal with the mess but it's not on your floor. I would guess that you have a problem drafting (what David [Dmun]alluded to). I do get soot in my flue but it never comes back down (unless water is in the equation). At the end of the day, I would say you have a drafting issue. Follow Davids [dmun]advice and let us know what the result is.

Les...

Jeanne 01-30-2009 08:50 PM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
Yes I have a door but it is on hinges. I do believe I have a drafting issue even though I have an exhaust fan on the flue outside. I am going to try to send some pictures so you can see it.

egalecki 01-31-2009 07:09 AM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
The exhaust fan can run until the cows come home but if there's not enough air able to flow through, it won't work. Like when you put your hand over the vacuum cleaner nozzle. It's still sucking, but nothing's coming through. I think Dmun's right. Open a window to see if it improves your draft. A fireplace or oven needs LOTS of air, far more than most newer houses let in naturally.

I think all ovens will get soot, but you're probably getting more because without enough air, your fire can't get hot enough to burn it off. Once my oven gets going, I have no smoke coming out of the chimney at all. You can see the heat shimmer in the air, but not smoke. If you can get a good air supply going, you should have less soot building up and that ought to get rid of the problem.

Xabia Jim 01-31-2009 07:56 AM

Re: Welcome to the new Forno Bravo Forum
 
Some pictures, design information and a few more answers might help.

How old is your oven and chimney...are they well cured?
How many times has it been used...and how often?
How long are you firing it up...is the chimney warming up enough?
How long is your chimney, what shape/diameter and what's it made of/lined with?


I take it the fan was put on after you were having problems with smoking in the kitchen.

The soot problem seems odd in that you are using seasoned hardwood and even using an exhaust fan but I'm thinking that the chimney could be poorly designed (too small?).

As a temporary fix to the soot problem on the floor I'd probably try and make some sort of container to catch the soot under the chimney at least keeping it off the floor.


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