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  #331  
Old 06-04-2014, 04:00 AM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

G'day
How's you oven going now! Seems I've missed some of your progress
Regards dave
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  #332  
Old 06-05-2014, 05:13 PM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

I didn't read all of threads, but I get the gist of it for curing.... My question is, I can't be there every day to light up and cure the oven. Can I cure for two days, wait three, start curing for one day wait three and then finish curing the next two.... Is there a problem if there is a gap between days to cure? Thank you. Ray
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  #333  
Old 07-15-2014, 09:52 AM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

Hi all,

Quick question... having waited patiently for 4 weeks, I'm following the 7-fire plan. I've just finished fire 3.

Using my infra-red point and shoot thermometer, I get different temperature readings all over the oven. For example, on today's fire I clocked the apex of the dome at around 220 C, the chimney gas at 120 degrees C and then anything from 80 C up depending where on the dome I was pointing (low and to the side being the lowest).

So... which temperature do I go by?
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  #334  
Old 07-15-2014, 06:09 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Sudbury Ont Canada
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Default Re: Oven Curing

FYI
don't get to hung up on this process. The temp will and should be highest at the top. Think of the fire brick that is 4" thick needs a long time of steady heat to allow for the brick to obsorb the heat. For a new build it is good to make small fires at first to slowly cure the morter but I found that just adding a pc of wood every so often to maintain a long fire that is low temp to penetrate the brick. This will get out the moisture. then each day do hte same thing but get the temp a little hiher each time.
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  #335  
Old 07-15-2014, 07:02 PM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

Quote:
Originally Posted by checker1965 View Post
I didn't read all of threads, but I get the gist of it for curing.... My question is, I can't be there every day to light up and cure the oven. Can I cure for two days, wait three, start curing for one day wait three and then finish curing the next two.... Is there a problem if there is a gap between days to cure? Thank you. Ray
No problem waiting longer in between fires. In fact there may be an advantage because it gives the moisture present, time to migrate back to the drier parts which then allows you to heat the oven more evenly without having such a huge difference in temperature and hence differing expansion rates.

Last edited by david s; 07-15-2014 at 07:04 PM.
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  #336  
Old 07-15-2014, 07:12 PM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

Quote:
Originally Posted by di11on View Post
Hi all,

Quick question... having waited patiently for 4 weeks, I'm following the 7-fire plan. I've just finished fire 3.

Using my infra-red point and shoot thermometer, I get different temperature readings all over the oven. For example, on today's fire I clocked the apex of the dome at around 220 C, the chimney gas at 120 degrees C and then anything from 80 C up depending where on the dome I was pointing (low and to the side being the lowest).

So... which temperature do I go by?
IR thermometers can be rather misleading in that they read the surface temperature. 10 mm below the surface will give you a lower temp, particularly when you are driving out the water. This big difference in temperature leads to a big difference in expansion rates which can cause damage either microscopically or as visible cracking. Just take it slower than you think is prudent and you should be ok. Also try reading the whole curing thread to get more of an idea what's going on.
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  #337  
Old 06-06-2015, 06:41 PM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

My oven is a steel 67 cm dome indoor one clad with 3-5 cm thick refractory. I have to do the curing withot thermometer. I understand from this thread that there are two major points to keep in mind when curing.
1- slowly drive out moisture without creating steam
2- run a small fire for the first two days for at least 3-4 hours each, I mean not just reach the 200 and 250 F and done.
Having no concept of temperature, I am doing my "blind" curing like this:
I start a small paper only fire and keep it as long as there is no steam emitted away from the refractory. Once the steam appears I let the fire die down and let the oven equalize. Once the oven cools down to fairly warm I repeat the process trying to increase the fire a little bit. Looks like this approach will take ages to fully cure the oven, but I will be sticking to it at least for 4 days just to stay at the safe side.
My alternative indicators to thermometer that will alarm me not to keep the fire going are any of these:
1- steam emitted from the refractory
2- a clear smell of moist concrete in the kitchen (smells like summer rain on a concrete slab)
3- a little sizzling sound close to the refractory maybe because of the steel shield. I could hear it with my ear an inch close to the cladding.
I will be stopping feeding the fire once any of these happens. Have been following this for the second day now. Cracking only happening at the desired "cracking control" joints except for two of the 15 refractory blocks having hairline cracks so far.
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  #338  
Old 06-07-2015, 12:25 AM
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Join Date: May 2014
Location: France
Posts: 103
Default Re: Oven Curing

Quote:
Originally Posted by v12spirit View Post
My oven is a steel 67 cm dome indoor one clad with 3-5 cm thick refractory. I have to do the curing withot thermometer. I understand from this thread that there are two major points to keep in mind when curing.
1- slowly drive out moisture without creating steam
2- run a small fire for the first two days for at least 3-4 hours each, I mean not just reach the 200 and 250 F and done.
Having no concept of temperature, I am doing my "blind" curing like this:
I start a small paper only fire and keep it as long as there is no steam emitted away from the refractory. Once the steam appears I let the fire die down and let the oven equalize. Once the oven cools down to fairly warm I repeat the process trying to increase the fire a little bit. Looks like this approach will take ages to fully cure the oven, but I will be sticking to it at least for 4 days just to stay at the safe side.
My alternative indicators to thermometer that will alarm me not to keep the fire going are any of these:
1- steam emitted from the refractory
2- a clear smell of moist concrete in the kitchen (smells like summer rain on a concrete slab)
3- a little sizzling sound close to the refractory maybe because of the steel shield. I could hear it with my ear an inch close to the cladding.
I will be stopping feeding the fire once any of these happens. Have been following this for the second day now. Cracking only happening at the desired "cracking control" joints except for two of the 15 refractory blocks having hairline cracks so far.
Not sure where you live, but an IR thermometer will only set you back $15 and you could probably have in a couple of days: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=ir+thermometer
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  #339  
Old 06-07-2015, 02:02 AM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

Quote:
Originally Posted by di11on View Post
Not sure where you live, but an IR thermometer will only set you back $15 and you could probably have in a couple of days: Amazon.com: ir thermometer
Thanks for the link. I live in Syria that lays on the east coast of the mediterranean sea. Should have thought of buying one. But I have been looking for an analog one to install as an aesthetic finishing icon. Haven't found one that reads up to 500 C yet. So I will not let that delay my build. Amazone stuff didn't hold in my region especially recently. Even though Amazone stuff can ship faster to Paris than one from Damascus to my town if ever it could be delivered safely.
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  #340  
Old 06-09-2015, 02:29 PM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

Day 5 of curing. Could't resist using a propane gas burner on days 2 and 3. The low continuous 4 hour fire it provided was importnt IMHO in the first 2 or 3 days to gently drive moisture out of a newly built, rather wet oven. Day 4 kindling for 3 hours. Day 5 kindling and 1-2 cm thick sticks for three hours.

I was getting a clear feedback right from the oven without a thermometer. Today, I've got a fourth indicator to stop feeding the fire; a little tickling sound from the refractory. Reckon that if I had responded to that sound in time I could have avoided a hairline crack getting a bit wider; the tickling sound was going from around that crack. However. The two cracks I have got so far are of minor importance.

Interesting how the oven was very sensitive to abrupt heat increase while letting you go to the next heat level safely when exposed to the previous heat level for a suffecient while; a couple of hours say. I think as stated, better let the whole oven see every new level of heat for a while to ensure a smooth shift to the next heat level.
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Last edited by v12spirit; 06-09-2015 at 02:54 PM.
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