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  #321  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:59 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 185
Default Re: Oven Curing

Well that's great news then Greenman. Essentially once the render has had a good week to cure I can start cooking? I kept a tarp over the oven for the entire wet weather period so the only moisture ingress would be from the humidity I think.
If I place a waterproof cover over the time whilst firing, what will I see if I still have moisture in the dome?
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  #322  
Old 04-03-2014, 03:06 AM
Greenman's Avatar
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Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Bundaberg. Australia
Posts: 790
Default Re: Oven Curing

Moisture would condense under the cover. If it does then remove it and keep firing to remove the moisture. No big deal but it will let you know when the moisture has gone completely and once that has gone there will be nothing to lift your coating. Likely that once you can start cooking and the skies are clear you won't be in a rush to paint things anyway.
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  #323  
Old 04-03-2014, 04:42 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: brisbane australia
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Default Re: Oven Curing

G'day
Oven will have more moisture distributed through it that you think. The insulation the oven material are all likely to have wicked up moisture from the render and that has to be teased out. Notice I didn't say "driven out". I ltr of water makes 1500 ltres of steam, so slow and steady with the drying fires
Regards dave
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  #324  
Old 04-03-2014, 02:14 PM
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Default Re: Oven Curing

G'day
Now the caution thing is out of the road you have a lot of positives. That dome surely has been baked hard in its previous life. You have ceramic blanket on the dome that gives you expansion area for steam that pearlite cement will not give you. You have a vent point high on the dome, the unsealed chimney that will allow moisture to vent. Its all plus plus plus
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  #325  
Old 04-13-2014, 05:31 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2014
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Default Primavera 60 Oven Curing

Hello All,

This is my first post but long time wanderer on this forum. We just received our 60 and I thought I would share my experience thus far from crate to first curing fire. I searched the forums for advice and found numerous post that provided great information but I couldn't find all the answers to the questions and uncertainty we had in our first WFO. Here we go.

Delivery: The oven arrived in a large crate and well packed. On two sides there are Shockwatch's that turn red if the crate was handled roughly to indicate potential damage. I say potential because if either turn red you are to open the top of the crate and inspect for damage. You are also advised to take photos of the shockwatch and inside the crate. You do all this with the driver still there and before signing the delivery receipt. You also write on the receipt that the shockwatch was red and crate was opened for inspection. Luckly there was no damage to our oven.

Installing the oven in the stand: The manual says to use 2x4 pieces of lumber and 4-5 strong persons to help lift and move the oven. There is a picture in the manual showing Forno workers lifting the oven with this method. I used the picture and some quick measurements of the stand to make my 2x4 lifting mechanism. I enlisted the help of 3 friends and my wife (she installed the bolts as the 4 of us held the oven in place.) I will say this now after having done this method: I would pay what ever it cost to rent a hoist if I were to do this again. We made it happen but the experience was nerve wracking and the oven is HEAVY. After lifting this beast and getting it installed, we jokingly commented that we think the oven the Forno workers are lifting and holding in the picture is a styrofoam oven because there is no strain looks on their faces and in fact they look like they are grinning. I think we used a 1/2 (15mm) socket to tighten the bolts.

Curing the oven: I was very nervous about this process because of the many post I read on here about ruining the oven if this is not done correctly. I used the method in the manual that has you curing your oven in 5 days with small to large fires as the days go on. I used small kindling for the first fire from my oak pile. I cured the oven on the first day for approximately 8 hours of constant fire and then put the lid in place for the remainder of the day and into the night. One question I had was what size fire is a 300 degree max fire. I determined this to be no more the 3-4 pieces of kindle at a time after you get a small bed of coals to sustain the fire. This equates to about the size of 2 fist in diameter. During initial flare up when adding new kindle in the oven the size would increase greater then this but only for a few seconds. I also found my self doing a lot of blowing to reignite the flame after the kindle burned down. I did this quite a bunch during the 8 hours. I used a digital infrared temperature gun to measure the domes temperature. I found the hottest part to be about 2-3 inches just above where the dome begins to arch. As soon as I begin the first fire, moisture/water began seeping from the doorway arch (good sign.) I constantly monitored the dome temperature and only a few times the temperature got above 300(max I saw 320 but only for a few seconds during initial flare ups after adding new kindle.) I still have a few more days of curing and will use slightly larger kindle to raise the temperature as the days go on.

The pictures attached should help answering most questions I had prior to doing this. Again I apologize to the monitors of this forum if this is not in the correct section but I'm really not sure where it would go. Looking forward to the first pizza!
Attached Thumbnails
Oven Curing-photo.jpg   Oven Curing-photo-1.jpg   Oven Curing-photo-2.jpg   Oven Curing-photo-3.jpg   Oven Curing-photo-4.jpg  

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  #326  
Old 05-21-2014, 04:03 AM
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Join Date: May 2014
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 15
Default Re: Oven Curing

So my oven is looking nice and dry, and I have done a couple of paper fires in it.

Now, at my work we have a few bags of compacted sawdust logs. We use them in our display homes as we have chimeneas (sp?) in some of them.

Given they are free and at my disposal, is there any reason not to use them? They proclaim low smoke and high heat and such on the packaging, but is there anything I am overlooking before using them for the next stage of curing?
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  #327  
Old 05-21-2014, 07:46 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 126
Default Re: Oven Curing

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkB View Post
So my oven is looking nice and dry, and I have done a couple of paper fires in it.

Now, at my work we have a few bags of compacted sawdust logs. We use them in our display homes as we have chimeneas (sp?) in some of them.

Given they are free and at my disposal, is there any reason not to use them? They proclaim low smoke and high heat and such on the packaging, but is there anything I am overlooking before using them for the next stage of curing?
I think the compressed logs over here contain some sort of petroleum based product. I don't think I would use those, but I don't have any good reason for it other than the thought of burning oil in a WFO...
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  #328  
Old 05-21-2014, 04:52 PM
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Join Date: May 2014
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 15
Default Re: Oven Curing

Quote:
Originally Posted by hubert_s View Post
I think the compressed logs over here contain some sort of petroleum based product. I don't think I would use those, but I don't have any good reason for it other than the thought of burning oil in a WFO...
I had a good read of the packet this morning, 100% sawdust and nowhere does it mention having any added fuels...

I guess there is really no reason not to, I'll give it a crack tomorrow and let everyone know what happens, unless someone does point out something I may be overlooking.
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  #329  
Old 05-21-2014, 05:14 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: grand rapids, michigan
Posts: 139
Default Re: Oven Curing

I am in Michigan, USA, and actually sell wood pellets and bricks. Yes, the bricks are compressed sawdust/wood chip and contain no additives. I have tried them, will stick to real wood. You need to know that I can buy a cord... 4'x4'x8' of seasoned hardwood for about $135.00.. I have an unlimited supply of beech for free.
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  #330  
Old 06-03-2014, 05:28 PM
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Join Date: May 2014
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 15
Default Re: Oven Curing

So for the last week or so I have been experimenting.

I have noticed the compacted sawdust logs are excellent for getting a good fire going. I use 3 evenly spaced on the bottom, then 2 mid sized pieces of Jarrah laying at 90 degrees over, and then some smaller pieces again on top.

The sawdust logs really get going easy, and get down to coals while the Jarrah is still buring with a flame. Working perfectly, cheap to buy and available everywhere, and means I can save the nicer timber for cooking with.
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