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-   -   Kiln dried Vs Seasoned? (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f16/kiln-dried-vs-seasoned-20147.html)

RichC 11-21-2013 10:47 AM

Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Hi,
whats the difference and does it matter to us?(I assume seasoned is just allowed to dry naturally??)

Thanks

Richard

Les 11-21-2013 11:41 AM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Rich,

It doesn't matter to us. Kiln dried lumber is more stable (won't warp) and the added cost is worth it if you are building something like cabinets.

RichC 11-21-2013 12:33 PM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Thanks Les!

JACKO3275 11-26-2013 06:48 AM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
As long ast the moisture content is below 20% its doesnt mater

RichC 11-26-2013 07:23 AM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JACKO3275 (Post 165953)
As long ast the moisture content is below 20% its doesnt mater

What's the downside of a higher moisture content as long as it burns?

boerwarrior 11-26-2013 12:16 PM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Smoke, soot, and doesn't burn as hot (at least not in the beginning)

RichC 11-26-2013 01:29 PM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Thx guys, will try and stick with kiln dried to ensure dryness

mikku 11-26-2013 01:54 PM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Never heard of anywhere that kiln dried wood was required for use in any type of wood burning device!

If you live near a cabinet shop or have access to builders who regularly have scrap materials then they are a good source for kindling or firewood. But you have to remember- kiln drying usually starts by introducing moisture to wood then it extracts it to specific uniform dryness. Once the wood is processed however, it will return to the moisture levels of its surroundings.

When I process my firewood, I try to remove as much bark as possible while it is being split. Wood without the bark dries quicker. Many people have differing ideas on this issue. Some say to keep the bark on, but split it once.
Others say to stack the wood with the bark upward so that it sheds water if exposed to rain, others say bark downward so the water can evaporate more easily from the wood.

Mine is different. I split the wood first attempting to peel the outer layers off with a hydraulic splitter. These off casts I will use for my WFO. The center bark less wood is used for a wood stove inside my home. Removing the bark also removes places for insects to breed and call home. These thin bark slabs that result dry very quickly and can be used the same year as cut.

Les 11-26-2013 01:56 PM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RichC (Post 165970)
Thx guys, will try and stick with kiln dried to ensure dryness

Rich, save your money. Pine can dry good enough to burn in 6 months. Oak may take a year. Kiln dried is overkill.

cobblerdave 11-26-2013 03:32 PM

Re: Kiln dried Vs Seasoned?
 
Gudday
Kiln dry your own! Pack some wood in you oven after your finished using it and let the remaining heat do it for you.
Regards dave


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