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-   -   Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this? (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f16/identifying-wood-what-kind-wood-18292.html)

brennerwilliam 08-30-2012 02:14 PM

Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
2 Attachment(s)
I found some wood for free on craigs and wanted to know if its suitable for my oven. Anybody has a clue?

Laurentius 08-30-2012 04:10 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
ROTTEN! Very little heat value.

SableSprings 08-30-2012 04:50 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
It's pretty hard to tell from the photo anything about the wood. Is there any possibility of you going to the place and taking a look at it yourself? I've been given some pine that doesn't look very good and I just use it for my bulk, early heating of the oven. If it's dry and free (of bugs too!), I'd think it would be worth checking into it a little more closely. I do wonder why it's in this garage...could have been some "good" stuff (walnut or apple) that was going to be used by a wood worker in his/her projects.

brennerwilliam 08-30-2012 05:08 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Laurentius (Post 137551)
ROTTEN! Very little heat value.

You're right, it does look either rotten or just really old...

Neil2 08-30-2012 05:38 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
Looks like pine. Possibly lodgepole pine.

If it still has "weight" to it and is not punky, go ahead and use it.

The best wood for wood ovens is free wood !

lwood 08-31-2012 07:11 AM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil2 (Post 137559)
The best wood for wood ovens is free wood !

Agreed!! unless it's punky and full of bugs, why not it's free

1willisrobbins 10-17-2012 01:55 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
People.
Bugs and rotten wood are the least of your problems.
Please do not burn PINE of any kind either for "bulk" burning or cooking. Pine pitch (even in the driest wood) has turpenes (turpentine) that when burned turn into n-Heptane a very dangerous hydrocarbon (think gasoline). You cannot burn it off. Cooking with it is insane. You will get sick from prolonged exposure. READ: Kidney failure, renal cancer, lung diseases etc.
Stop. Think about what you are burning.
Free kidney failure is not a good deal.

brickie in oz 10-17-2012 11:54 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1willisrobbins (Post 140589)
People.
Bugs and rotten wood are the least of your problems.
Please do not burn PINE of any kind either for "bulk" burning or cooking. Pine pitch (even in the driest wood) has turpenes (turpentine) that when burned turn into n-Heptane a very dangerous hydrocarbon (think gasoline). You cannot burn it off. Cooking with it is insane. You will get sick from prolonged exposure. READ: Kidney failure, renal cancer, lung diseases etc.
Stop. Think about what you are burning.
Free kidney failure is not a good deal.

Sounds like one of them "the sky is falling" myths. :rolleyes:
Havent ppl been burning the stuff for thousands of years and all of a sudden now its a problem. :confused:

The flash point of n-Heptane is -4c so how come you cant burn it?

1willisrobbins 10-18-2012 11:01 AM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
Brickie-in-Oz,

So perhapse I was simplistic in my explination. Here is a better one:
All Pine trees produce oleoresin a.k.a. sap, the sticky stuff that drips from wounded i.e. cut pine trees. Oleoresin itself is a stable compound at normal temperatures. However, when heated i.e. burned, it begins to break into its constituent parts including but not limited to terpenes and in some pine trees like the Jefferys Pine..."[whose] wood is similar to Ponderosa Pine wood, and is used for the same purposes. The exceptional purity of n-heptane distilled from Jeffrey Pine resin led to n-heptane being selected as the zero point on the octane rating scale of petrol."

I'm not making this up.

Pine trees when burned are technically noxious. The chemical compounds released during burning are not rendered ''safe'' by high temperatures. No more than gasoline fumes are rendered safe to inhale. If pine is used in an oven the net result is a burning of hydrocarbons including n-Heptane among others depending on the pine tree.

yes the 'flash' point is low because...

"The flash point of a volatile material is the lowest temperature at which it can vaporize to form an ignitable mixture in air. Measuring a flash point requires an ignition source. At the flash point, the vapor may cease to burn when the source of ignition is removed." - yes -4c is low but most things have low 'flash' points when exposed to open flame...like tissue paper.

A more applicable temperature is the autoignition point...

"The autoignition temperature or kindling point of a substance is the lowest temperature at which it will spontaneously ignite in a normal atmosphere without an external source of ignition, such as a flame or spark. This temperature is required to supply the activation energy needed for combustion. The temperature at which a chemical will ignite decreases as the pressure increases or oxygen concentration increases. It is usually applied to a combustible fuel mixture." +223c for n-Heptane...

Either way it doesn't matter to me because n-Heptane "As an organic solvent, its vapor can irritate the skin and eyes, damage the lungs and respiratory system, as well as the central nervous system when inhaled, and cause renal failure when ingested, among other things"...

Again I'm not making this up.

April 30, 2009 -- Scientists have discovered a new class of chemicals emitted from burning pine trees. From a family of compounds known for their ability to alter human DNA, the findings could change the way we look at the impact of forest fires on public health.-June 1 edition of the journal Environmental Science and Technology

No, people have not used pine for cooking for thousands of years. There are thousands of species of wood available for cooking that have been used. There are dozens if not hundreds that are poisonous to humans like trying to cook with a Oleander trees or natural latex producing trees found in the tropics world wide, or even pine trees.

Please feel free to burn whatever you want in your oven. I was mearly stating that buring pine, because of its chemical make up, is not the same as your average tree and is potentially dangerous, especially long term exposure.

Laurentius 10-18-2012 04:48 PM

Re: Identifying this wood. What kind of wood is this?
 
If you are old(than 40) and grew in any southern state in the USA and know anything about outdoor life, pine was you friend. If you needed a fire, the pine limb was abundant. If you need to start a fire, there were nothing better than, fatwood, lighter wood, pine knot, heart pine which is the resin laden heartwood of pine. Pine is and always will be used because of its availability and cost. It is not ideally the best wood to use nor is it the worse.


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