#71  
Old 03-12-2008, 04:14 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Les,

Because of the way combustion air enters these ovens (along the floor), I've always had a tendency to use longer pieces, so the fire burns from front to back, giving you complete combustion without a lot of fiddling.

Here's what I do:

1. Build a crib fire out of kindling toward the front of the oven; when it's burning brightly, add some hardwood limbs about an inch or two in diameter.

2. When that's burning brigthly, push the fire back toward the center of the floor, but not dead center, yet.

3. Then, push to the center and loosely crisscross longer pieces over the fire to almost fill the chamber. Whack on draft door if you have one. Develop the famous plasma fire.

With a 42 inch floor, using this method, I'd leave the pieces you have as long as they are. You could even go longer. My hearth is 4' deep and 3' wide, and I commonly use pieces up to 36" long. Experiment; it might work for you. Try to avoid the fireplace idea that the fire should be built in the middle. You want fire EVERYWHERE.

Jim
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  #72  
Old 03-12-2008, 07:14 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Thanks Jim.

As always - valuable input. Never thought about the draft - makes sense. Should have posted this question sooner - I have many little chunks.

Les...
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  #73  
Old 03-12-2008, 07:35 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

You can even burn really long pieces hanging them out the door. You've got to keep an eye out if they hang out much beyond the landing, you don't want burning logs on the patio.

And the little chunks? Greatly useful for putting the fire once it's pushed to the side to get that flame up the dome.
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:41 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

I like the bigger stuff at the bottom and smaller on top to start. The smaller kindling falls into the gap between the bottom logs and gets them blazing.

I like 12 - 16 inch pieces of wood. I can just tee pee them around the sides as I expand the fire deeper into the dome. Mid-sized round branches are a pain in the rear. They always, always roll off into an area where you can't retrieve them without risking your arm hairs.
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:49 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Quote:
They always, always roll off into an area where you can't retrieve them without risking your arm hairs.
We've really got to get those clinker-grabbers back into production:

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  #76  
Old 03-12-2008, 10:49 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

David, do you own those clinker grabbers or is that a photo pulled from the web? I'm curious as to the overall length. These are exactly what I was looking for last year before I bought my log tongs...took several weeks of repeated searching on ebay to find my 31" tongs; although they work great another 6-12 inches would be perfect for reaching the rear of the oven without sticking your arms too far in (elbow length welders gloves are a godsend)....took several weeks for my arm hair to grow back.

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  #77  
Old 03-16-2008, 08:19 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

How long has a cord of wood lasted those of you that buy their wood in quantity? If you don't buy a cord, then a 1/4 cord? ETC?
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  #78  
Old 03-16-2008, 09:02 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

My first two loads were approx. 1/2 cord each (we did not measure exactly - free from a friend and we were just "filling" the back of my truck); each load lasted about 3 months. I've just started (maybe 3 firings) from my first "purchase" of a cord.....this will last awhile, it is primarily citrus - burns extremely hot and slow. Please keep in mind that how often you fire it up, makes a big difference. Due to frequent work travels, I don't think I have ever fired more than twice in a week....usually pizza on saturday, then a smaller recharge fire on Sunday, depending on what I may be making.

As the saying goes.....your mileage may vary.

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  #79  
Old 03-17-2008, 11:30 AM
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Default Re: Buying wood

I looked for a clinker-grabber on ebay. I think there's not many of them around for sale. I forgot to check back again. Looks like a great old tool!
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Old 03-17-2008, 12:44 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckJim View Post
Les,

Because of the way combustion air enters these ovens (along the floor), I've always had a tendency to use longer pieces, so the fire burns from front to back, giving you complete combustion without a lot of fiddling.

Here's what I do:

1. Build a crib fire out of kindling toward the front of the oven; when it's burning brightly, add some hardwood limbs about an inch or two in diameter.

2. When that's burning brigthly, push the fire back toward the center of the floor, but not dead center, yet.

3. Then, push to the center and loosely crisscross longer pieces over the fire to almost fill the chamber. Whack on draft door if you have one. Develop the famous plasma fire.

With a 42 inch floor, using this method, I'd leave the pieces you have as long as they are. You could even go longer. My hearth is 4' deep and 3' wide, and I commonly use pieces up to 36" long. Experiment; it might work for you. Try to avoid the fireplace idea that the fire should be built in the middle. You want fire EVERYWHERE.

Jim
Jim, I'm going to focus on scavanging for thinner limbs, so far when lots have been cleared they shread the limbs and leave the trunks. That also will avoid the splitting.
I'm wondering with more fire closer to the arch will this clean the soot from the entry way? Soot is gone from the dome but the opening is dirty.
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