#61  
Old 03-11-2008, 03:59 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

James, that was your gift of info! Les, are you still in on the other supply?
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  #62  
Old 03-11-2008, 11:21 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Quote:
Originally Posted by james View Post
26'x20'x2'

I wonder how many cords that it.
James
That is 1040 cu.ft or 29.5 cu.mtr. which is 8.125 cords or $24.61 a cord in big chunks...........

That should last a party season...............

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  #63  
Old 03-12-2008, 08:59 AM
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Default Re: Buying wood

I am going to purchase the wood. I will arange things with you guys.
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  #64  
Old 03-12-2008, 10:05 AM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Well, the logistics of getting the wood for Reno could not happen. Cost of truck, fuel, distance and time was not feasable. I hope that those of you in the bay area will take advantage. Here is the name and number of the guy, being that the post timed out with his information. He had emailed me so I thought passing it along would be helpful. Please don't just call to chat. He has all the wood still, in rounds.
Zack
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  #65  
Old 03-12-2008, 11:31 AM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Has anyone ever rented a log splitter from HD?

How hard is it? Is it even vaguely fun?

James
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  #66  
Old 03-12-2008, 12:34 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

James, log spliters are cake to use. If you have a few friends to help, you should go throgh the rounds quickly, depending on the volume.
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  #67  
Old 03-12-2008, 12:56 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

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Originally Posted by CanuckJim View Post
RC,

Sorry, mate, split it now. It will season much better and much faster in split form; also burns better in the end.

Jim
I thought that would be the answer, the wood I'm using I've cut from whole trees that were cut down. I'm burning stuff that was cut down last year, but I need to split it now. They still seem somewhat wet, could be the rain we have had.
I'm building a place for wood storage with angle iron and stone column and I'm wondering once I have it filled should I have a tarp on top?
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  #68  
Old 03-12-2008, 02:40 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

RC,

It might be that your wood in the round still is not seasoned completely. There's a difference between water and sap or resin. Once the sap or resin goes, the cell walls dry up and shrink; that's what makes the radial lines or checks in the cut ends. Left in the round, the process is slowed. Seasoned wood that's been rained on shouldn't take all that long to dry out, week or two out of the elements. It's always a good idea to protect your wood from the elements, whether it's seasoned or in the process. My woodshed, has air gaps in the back wall and no real floor to speak of, although the wood is kept off the ground. Both allow air circulation (very important). The roof is just the galvanized roofing you might see on a barn. Transfers lots of drying heat to the interior in sunny weather. A tarp should be raised above the wood, so no moisture is trapped.

I use lots of limb wood, between one and five inches in diameter, just as it comes off the tree. Anything thicker, I split.

Jim
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Old 03-12-2008, 02:58 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

While we are on this subject - what is the ideal length of wood for a 42 inch oven? The walnut that I picked up last weekend was mostly cut 20 - 22 inches. Seemed a bit long so I started cutting them in half.

Les...
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  #70  
Old 03-12-2008, 03:07 PM
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Default Re: Buying wood

Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckJim View Post
RC,

It might be that your wood in the round still is not seasoned completely. There's a difference between water and sap or resin. Once the sap or resin goes, the cell walls dry up and shrink; that's what makes the radial lines or checks in the cut ends. Left in the round, the process is slowed. Seasoned wood that's been rained on shouldn't take all that long to dry out, week or two out of the elements. It's always a good idea to protect your wood from the elements, whether it's seasoned or in the process. My woodshed, has air gaps in the back wall and no real floor to speak of, although the wood is kept off the ground. Both allow air circulation (very important). The roof is just the galvanized roofing you might see on a barn. Transfers lots of drying heat to the interior in sunny weather. A tarp should be raised above the wood, so no moisture is trapped.

I use lots of limb wood, between one and five inches in diameter, just as it comes off the tree. Anything thicker, I split.

Jim
I'm glad I asked this question, won't help now but next year Just Wait.
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