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  #21  
Old 01-28-2014, 01:18 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

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Originally Posted by Wambat View Post
I think the moderator vets postings by new users, so it took a little while to appear.
Talking about vets ..... oh .. doesn't matter ......
Gudday Wambat
Check out the Aust section, you have a fellow SA called dodgygrog just starting out same as yourself.
Regards dave
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  #22  
Old 02-08-2014, 01:46 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

For those reading about building a better fire, take a look at the tools forum and look at the "Rooker" that I built. I would appreciate comments on this as well. Not so many people are looking at the tools - I think they think it for tools to build you oven, and maybe it is. Oh well. I have not used it yet and I have not attached a handle to the second rooker that will be for close in work where a long handle will get in the way. Once I had all of the materials, it took be less than 1/2 to make the tool.
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  #23  
Old 02-08-2014, 08:49 PM
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Question Re: Building A Better Fire

G'day
I saw your new/old tool, and I was taken by the shape. I thought different!, that shapes got me in. It's an old design, so does that serve a purpose, is it something developed to that shape over time? I was also struck by how shallow it was my own aluminium rake is twice as high and half as wide.
Decided at that time I was keeping an open mind to this design and see what you posted when you used it. So I'm still interested in how it proves in service. I'm not even going to hazard a quess.
Regards dave
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  #24  
Old 02-08-2014, 10:05 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

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Originally Posted by cobblerdave View Post
G'day
I saw your new/old tool, and I was taken by the shape. I thought different!, that shapes got me in. It's an old design, so does that serve a purpose, is it something developed to that shape over time? I was also struck by how shallow it was my own aluminium rake is twice as high and half as wide.
Decided at that time I was keeping an open mind to this design and see what you posted when you used it. So I'm still interested in how it proves in service. I'm not even going to hazard a quess.
Regards dave
Well, I tried it today and put an hour of fire in the oven. Sole purpose was to put the tool through it paces.

I found that the unusual shape has a specific purpose - since the offset is doubled over (the u-shaped portion) and thus has more than twice the weight as its offset - it counter balances the blade so the tool does not twist in your hands. Also, it adds weight to the end of the tool which helps hold it down when plowing through heavier ashes and coals.

I also found that the blade tip reaches into all corners of the oven and is reversible by flipping it over.

Some of the tools I make are one offs and never see use again in their current form. I love to experiment.

In this case I think I have a winner. I am posting a picture from the original plate from the 1730's - I hope that it is readable in it format and size.

Thank you Dave for your interest and comments. It helps alot
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  #25  
Old 02-08-2014, 10:16 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

I once weighed my wood pile before and after firing and found it used 4kg of wood to clear the dome. This took one and a half hours and the thermometer situated halfway up the dome wall was showing 350C. The mass of the wood used is a better measure than volume as it is the weight that determines how much energy the wood contains.I should mention that my oven is only 540mm (21") diam. So the chamber volume is small. A 20% increase in diam means around a 70% increase in volume. Fuel consumption generally is directly related to chamber volume.

Regarding the amount of fuel in the chamber at any one time, it is better not to overload the chamber as this results in a rich atmosphere which is not so efficient. It's a bit like a car engine running on an over rich mixture. When firing kilns an over rich mixture is sometimes used for certain effects and is called a reducing atmosphere. When changing from an oxidation atmosphere to a reducing one the kiln usually stops rising in temperature and sometimes the temperature actually drops, although more fuel is going in. Attempting to control the atmosphere in a WFO is difficult because the gases from the fuel are released progressively, but it does mean that less is more and the loading of the fuel is somewhat counterintuitive. Too much fuel will not lead to a faster temperature rise or hotter fire.

Last edited by david s; 02-09-2014 at 12:37 AM. Reason: spelling again
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  #26  
Old 02-08-2014, 10:29 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

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Originally Posted by david s View Post
I once weighed my wood pile before and after firing and found it used 4kg of wood to clear the dome. This took one and a half hours and the thermometer situated halfway up the dome wall was showing 350C. The mass of the wood used is a better measure than volume as it is the weight that determines how much energy the wood contains.I should mention that my oven is only 540mm (21") diam. So the chamber volume is small. A 20% increase in diam means around a 70% increase in volume and the fuel consumption is directly related to fuel consumption.
Great comment -I Agee, I use about 10 Kilos to get the oven to fully clear. This takes one hour. As to the mass of the wood, a review of the BTU output per cord of wood of different types of wood is dramatic, but when you look at the BTU output based on weight, the difference is very little.

That is why if I am buying wood I look at the cost per kilo not for the volume.
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  #27  
Old 02-09-2014, 04:39 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

There are plenty of variables but good well cured hardwood takes some beating. Rural in my part of the world just means that you need a chainsaw and a way to get it home.

Once you find out what burns smoke free and what to leave where you find it is all good.
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  #28  
Old 02-09-2014, 06:39 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

I have a great way of starting the fire. I'd love to share it, but it involves flammable liquid, and unfortunately I can just about guarantee that some dumbass will try it with petrol instead of turps.
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  #29  
Old 02-09-2014, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

No liquid anything for me. Just twigs, kindling and small logs to get the fire started. Then build the fire with progressively larger wood.

jon
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  #30  
Old 02-09-2014, 08:45 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

G'day
Couple of pieces of Charcoal soaked with teaspoon of metho spirit (Dentured alcohol) makes a great firestarter . No petrol smell either.
Regards dave
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