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  #11  
Old 01-27-2014, 01:46 AM
cobblerdave's Avatar
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Quote:
Originally Posted by V-wiz View Post
Interesting idea, but may i ask why you guys build and start the fire at the entrance? In my case i build my fire inside at the middle, i put my blast door on for 30 second and everything is perfectly lit and smoke goes up the chimney without a problem.
Gudday
I use the top down method and build my fire in the front of the oven and get it flaming and the chimney hot. It's a simple case of pushing it in to the middle of the oven and it will do its thing . Advantage I find is that it easy to build the fire in the front no reaching in. Heats the chimney so it draws well from the start. Recon there's less smoke as the fires pretty hot already when it arrives in the cold oven. I'd recommend you give it a try can't hurt.
Regards dave
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  #12  
Old 01-27-2014, 02:06 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Quote:
Originally Posted by TropicalCoasting View Post
Does anyone in Australia have some figures on how much hard wood it takes to get the oven sorted.
Im assuming 42 is the standard
but
Im willing to go smaller

Do people use a bit of wattle or palm fronds to get it started?
Im trying to do the maths on how much wood Im going to need everytime I fire one up.
Gudday
Recon Micks s about right with the small sticks and the 1/2 to 3/4 of a barrow of wood. Sticks burn fast and hot and give you good heat plus there's little or no chopping large logs into smaller bits.
As for burning wattle its an acacia and they have a high tannin content. Of course they burn but tend to produce a acrid smoke as long as you burn them at the beginning not the end when they might taint your food.
I burn the fallen palm fronds as well again the smokes not sweet. If there are not complete dry it doesn't matter they burst into flame instantly in a hot oven. They burn fast so its one at a time till there are gone.
There was a time that I didn't take out the excess ash but now I do as it can insulated the floor from the heat from the dome and active coals. It's a pain playing with hot ashes but it works out better.
Hope something here might help.
Regards dave
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  #13  
Old 01-27-2014, 03:18 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

I use a variety of timber to get things going. Most of it is dense hardwood but being a 'harvester' I can tell you that mangrove displaced by the floods is good starting wood when it eventually dries out. Some of the eucalypt s are good for quick heat but the really dense timber like ironbark and the like are great to maintain temps when used as larger pieces.

I have a supply of timber from old well dried stumps and roots that is as heavy as lead and burns for a very long time.

The term 'scrounger' has been discussed on the forum before and when it comes to fuel for the forno, anything that has not been treated or doesn't emit anything nasty is good to go, including the well dried prunings from the garden. I am aware the the term means different things but in the sense of recycler it is good for me.

I am a bit lucky with being in the country rather than the city but even in the city there are opportunities for the keen scrounger. Storms bring down trees and branches and they need to be removed by someone, and if you have a chainsaw............
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  #14  
Old 01-27-2014, 05:56 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobblerdave View Post
Gudday
I use the top down method and build my fire in the front of the oven and get it flaming and the chimney hot. It's a simple case of pushing it in to the middle of the oven and it will do its thing . Advantage I find is that it easy to build the fire in the front no reaching in. Heats the chimney so it draws well from the start. Recon there's less smoke as the fires pretty hot already when it arrives in the cold oven. I'd recommend you give it a try can't hurt.
Regards dave
I agree with cobblerdave: It not only heats up the chimney which improves the draw, but it heats up the top lip of the oven door. When the lip is very hot the gasses in oven pass over the lip quicker - its almost as if it becomes slippery. The overall effect again is ease of fire build - Hot coal barrier at the door to eliminate cold air going in (like in Detroit -what -40f?) - Hot chimney and a hot door top. When you try it as described, let me know how it works - we can always adapt new methods.
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  #15  
Old 01-27-2014, 07:30 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobblerdave View Post
Gudday
I use the top down method and build my fire in the front of the oven and get it flaming and the chimney hot. It's a simple case of pushing it in to the middle of the oven and it will do its thing . Advantage I find is that it easy to build the fire in the front no reaching in. Heats the chimney so it draws well from the start. Recon there's less smoke as the fires pretty hot already when it arrives in the cold oven. I'd recommend you give it a try can't hurt.
Regards dave
Thanks Dave, ill give it a try
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  #16  
Old 01-27-2014, 07:33 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Thanks ^ ill try it when im able to fire the oven
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  #17  
Old 01-27-2014, 07:58 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

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Originally Posted by wotavidone View Post
Apart from 42 being the answer to life, the universe, and everything, (proving that there is something fundamentally wrong with the universe, apologies to Douglas Adams), I don't quite get what you mean.

However, I believe cobblerdave uses palm fronds to heat his oven.
Apparently this is a free resource that would otherwise present a disposal problem.

It doesn't take a lot of wood to heat my 30 inch to white. One day I'll cut a wheelbarrow full of wood and see how much I have left after a decent pizza party.

I suggest it won't really take a lot of expensive wood to heat any oven.
The thing is, while I like to use low ash timber, I also find my oven heats better if I use thin sticks to get a nice raging fire going. This means I commonly find myself picking up the thin branches of redgum that the serious firewood collectors leave behind.

I re-read your post and you indicated that you get a "raging fire going." you might try a lower level fire. I use a fire that goes up no higher the 3/4 of the way up the wall.

I found that a bigger fire is not hotter, only more BTU's up the chimney. Try an experiment and use a fishing weight scale to weigh out your fuel in 5 kilo piles (type of fuel not relevent). Then build a smaller fire and let it burn longer. I find that 5 kilos takes about 20 min to consume as you gradually add fuel. This gives you time to sip a little more beer and even smoke a nice cigar while giving all the appearance of working.

It is my experience that since the fire is not hotter, than it is the amount of time the heat is exposed to the brick that gets a nice even hot oven.
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  #18  
Old 01-27-2014, 11:51 AM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

To WOMBAT:

This your question-

What I use is Doug fir.
---End Quote---
Typo ??? Thought it would stink up the place....

Dog Fur that is

PS....
Sorry... my first post on this board....
And my really strange sense of humor

Try posting a reply instead of quick reply - that way everyone can see it and respond. I am no expert and when you post it online you get the benefit of the hundreds that are expert or have at least felt your pain.

Answer: Doug Fir is short for Douglas Fir. It is a medium soft wood that grows tall in the North American west. It is more dense than pine and does not have sap, It is the principle material used as building lumber. Most American homes that are "stick" (wood) constructed use Doug Fir as the structural material - you can find it common in (inches) 2x4 2x6 2x8 4x4 4x6 and 4x8.

It does does not have a bad smell but it is a little acrid. Not great for cooking. The BTU is less than oak but more than pine. Best size is a 2x4 split to 2x2 or smaller - around 18in long.

I use any non toxic wood I can find to heat the oven up. If I only had eucalyptus, I would use it gladly, very heavy and burns hot. I use it also.
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  #19  
Old 01-27-2014, 12:17 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wambat View Post
Typo ??? Thought it would stink up the place....

Dog Fur that is

PS....
Sorry... my first post on this board....
And my really strange sense of humor
I found your post at last. It just popped up on my email and I could not find it in the thread - I thought you had used quick post and it went somewhere else. I dont know why it took 2 days for it to show up in my mail.
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  #20  
Old 01-27-2014, 02:46 PM
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Default Re: Building A Better Fire

Quote:
Originally Posted by navyintel View Post
I dont know why it took 2 days for it to show up in my mail.
I think the moderator vets postings by new users, so it took a little while to appear.
Talking about vets ..... oh .. doesn't matter ......
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