#11  
Old 04-07-2011, 03:10 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

I used 1/2 bricks for my soldier course. Not much movement one year later and I slam my oven regularly with 1400-1600 degree firings at the max. The only movement so far was along one side of the dome where my 1/2 bricks weren't overlapping well-only about an 1/8 inch gap or so. I didn't even consider NOT using a soldier course.

Tom
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  #12  
Old 04-08-2011, 03:35 AM
lwood's Avatar
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeanAnimal View Post
If the soldier course is beveled, then the course above it will tend to want to tilt it outward, or force it to slide if it can. The bevel locks the second chain in place, transfering all of the force to the soldier course. Reinforcing he soldier course locks everything into place.

The only benefits I see of having a full 9" (or close too) height on the first chain is to create more floor space, especially on a low dome that narrows quickly, especially on a dome that is built AROUND the floor instead of on it.
Agreed, I believe the soldier course locks the dome into place and reinforcement around the soldier course is the safest method. Primarily because with the lateral forces pushing on brick as apposed the mortar joint, I think the solid brick would win a shear test. The lateral forces are the same no mater the configuration, so yes the soldier course has a tendency to be pushed out. Thus the need for abutment at the soldier course.

Because of my experience with my 60" oven I don't really think you start needing abutment until you get over 30" dia. I have gotten away with no reinforcement so far. But now that I know better, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.
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  #13  
Old 04-08-2011, 06:49 AM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

I think I would agree that the need for lateral support on a 30" dome is much less of an issue. These are not "sprung" structures and instead the forces at play are a simple function of mass. Larger structures have more arched mass and therefore concentrate more force at their moorings.

I would also fully agree that the ideal situation is preventing the first chain (soldier course) from sliding or tiping instead of trying to anchor a flat course above it and relying on a mortar joint to hold. As you indicate, the larger the dome, the more important this point becomes.

All of this talk of domes and am I still yet to break ground. Soon my friends... soon...
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  #14  
Old 04-08-2011, 05:43 PM
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

Bean, good discussion on this subject, thanks for bringing it up. Did Phil see his shadow this year, you should be starting soon...
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  #15  
Old 04-08-2011, 08:15 PM
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

I did a half soldier course for the first chain. Though not a perfect arch, it "felt" better to me, and I think my thrust is still within acceptable limits. My entry arch is a different matter. I'm buttressing that thing.

Brickie trivia: a brick is called a "soldier" when it stands upright with narrow side ("stretcher") facing out. It is called a "sailor" when it stands upright with the wide side facing out. That's why it's called the "soldier course.". I'm amazed at all the masonry lingo and trivia I've picked up working on this project.
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  #16  
Old 04-10-2011, 05:38 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

In the past, we used to go to Gobblers Knob and watch Phil while drinking beer. Much has changed with the event over the years and it, for lack of better words, is just not much fun anymore

I hope to start the foundadtion this coming week if the weather holds. Due to the heavy clay, I need to be able to dig the footers, pour, stack and backfill without rain or my excavation will fill with water and NEVER drain unless I pump it out
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  #17  
Old 04-12-2011, 03:52 PM
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeanAnimal View Post
It may help for those having trouble with the physics to take a simple cross section of the dome, through its peak. You end up with an arch. The dome is (for the most part) an arch rotatated around an axis and the forces act in the same manner with regard to the legs and base. The strenght of the vertical legs must be sufficient to prevent the arch from spreading or toppling the legs. Any joint in the arch or legs should be at an angle (or of sufficient strength if not) that resists the forces acting upon them.

When the leg and/or joint is of sufficient strength to be static, then the force is counteracted and the load (mass) is transfered to the bearing surface. The difference between the truncated dome and the perfect half sphere are somewhat ambiguos in this case, as the entire dome is made of stacked chains of brick. The angled joint atop the soldier course does help to counteract the outward thurst of the arch, so long as the soldier course is held in place and prevent from sliding outward.

In any case, I don't see many failed domes, so the entire subject would appear to be more academic than important to our projects
I agree with most of what you have here - except that the loads are transferred vertically. The arch load pushes down and out. See here for a basic illustration: Arch Loading

If the arch simply pushed "down," there would be no need to mortar the "soldier" course in place. The reason it needs to be mortared to to provide some resistance against the outward force caused by the arch. The bigger (higher, heavier) the arch - the more buttressing needed.

Buttressing . . .

Last edited by Cheesesteak; 04-12-2011 at 03:55 PM.
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  #18  
Old 04-12-2011, 07:23 PM
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

Nice example Cheese. Agreed, it's primarily academic. We can use my 60" low-dome as a test case. No buttressing, red clay fire-brick and a solider course extending 2" above the hearth, covered with 4 inches of 5-1 unexpanded perlite.

My feeling is that the red clay fire-brick would fail long before the aluminized fire-brick. so mine should be the worst case. This discussion has gotten me nervous about my dome, especially anyone climbing on it. I don't worry, so much, about the static forces. It's any sudden loads may be a problem. No cracks so far, so good. I need to add another layer of vermiculite before finishing. So am going to be careful. It did support one small Filipino mason during the insulation layer installation.

I think the insulation layer itself also provides some structural support.

Overall, I think the idea of buttressing is a good idea over say 42" dia. But less than that it's a bit over-kill.
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Old 04-12-2011, 11:06 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Soldier- beveled or no?

I don't disagree at all cheese... If my explanation implied differently then it was due to poor wording on my part
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