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  #11  
Old 10-09-2012, 02:04 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: colorado
Posts: 49
Default Re: Pouring the hearth

I will qualify this question before going any further . I am a total noob just starting my oven but from what I think I understand in reading this thread is that the vermicrete slab goes on top of a concrete slab , so from the bottom up it would be ....concrete , vermicrete fire brick . In reading the book "the bread builders " , I understand the pictures to be vermicrete , concrete , and fire brick , again from the bottom up . Which order is correct? Thanks for the clarification.
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:45 AM
mrchipster's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Posts: 1,240
Default Re: Pouring the hearth

Jim, Here it is from the top down

Outside above the oven - Sky and clouds and sometimes rain and snow
Roof or igloo shell - Weather protection
Insulation - Ceramic blanket, loose fill of perlite or vermiculite or vermicrete
Dome fire bricks
Hot oven - inside the oven where you cook and burn wood
Floor Fire Brick - optional soapstone
Ceramic board insulation (optional - but highly recommended)
Vermicrete - a less expensive but less effective insulating layer than ceramic board
Structural Concrete with rebar or rewire.
Outside below the oven and or the stand or structure that the whole thing sits on.
Ground - Mother earth

Attached is a drawing of just the area you asked about

Chip
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Last edited by mrchipster; 10-10-2012 at 09:26 AM.
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2012, 05:57 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: colorado
Posts: 49
Default Re: Pouring the hearth

Chip , thanks for the drawing . This is opposite what alan scott teaches , correct? What is th advantage to doing it this way ? Does the weight of the completed , cladded oven tend to compress the vermicrete? Thanks so much for the explanations.
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  #14  
Old 10-10-2012, 06:16 PM
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Default Re: Pouring the hearth

Alan Scott was a great breadmaker, but a horrible oven designer.
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  #15  
Old 10-10-2012, 07:25 PM
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Default Re: Pouring the hearth

Quote:
Originally Posted by jim81147 View Post
Chip , thanks for the drawing . This is opposite what alan scott teaches , correct? What is th advantage to doing it this way ? Does the weight of the completed , cladded oven tend to compress the vermicrete? Thanks so much for the explanations.
Jim,

Insulate the hot areas to the benefit of higher oven temps, lower wood usage, and longer retained heat for additional cooking the next or longer days into the future, my oven is built this way and i am often cooking 5 days after i put out the fire.

The only possible reason I can think of for concrete below the bricks, before the insulation; is additional floor mass and that can easily be achieved by standing the firebrick on their sides and only if you are a serious bread baker and i mean 50 loaves a day each and every day, I can turn out 20 loaves of bread before needing to reheat my oven and that is the day after having a fire in the oven. I only have a single layer of bricks and they are laid out thin side not on edge.

The fun of the oven for me is producing all of the various forms of food that can be made by the differing temperatures you get as the temp goes down,

Pizza on fire night, Steak or seafood the next day over hot coals, bread that afternoon or evening or the following day, Roasts stews or other baked goods the 3rd day, slow cooked foods and or ribs on days 4 and 5 and dehydrating and drying like jerkey on days 5 6 and 7 then back to fire. or if I choose; Fire it back up mid week for something special.

It is all easy and good if well insulated. besides it fires up real quick with minimal wood if the oven is already hot. or part way to hot.

The vermicrete is very strong in compression so no worries about it compacting once firm and cured.

And thanks to this post and FB for my new Rank as "Master Builder"

Chip

Last edited by mrchipster; 10-10-2012 at 07:36 PM.
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