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  #21  
Old 10-03-2007, 11:08 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,446
Default Re: Porchetta

OK, looks like I have enough evidence to present my case to the presiding judge of Christmas dinner (my wife). I may give this a try this weekend as a trial run. My local market always has small to medium fresh hams (shoulders) with the skin on, boning and spices should not be a problem....I can't wait for a sandwhich like the one posted by Drake...mmmmmm
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  #22  
Old 10-04-2007, 06:21 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 257
Default Re: Porchetta

RT - thanks for the clarification of head cheese. I figured it must be something like that, but the word 'cheese' had me guessing, as cheese it certainly ain't!

Another cultural question. Here we can buy a leg of pork (uncooked), or a leg of pickled pork (pickled in brine) to cook up, but ham is (usually) a leg of pork that has been first pickled and then smoked over a slow fire for a good period of time. Come Christmas time, legs of ham here are skinned, the fat scored into a diamond pattern and studded with cloves, then basted with a nice glaze.

As far as I know, prosciutto is dry-cured in salt, and is quite dry. Our ham is quite moist by comparison.

So when you say you're going to buy a 'fresh ham', is it raw pork or something else?

Paul.
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  #23  
Old 10-04-2007, 06:46 AM
dmun's Avatar
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 4,216
Default Re: Porchetta

In the US a "fresh ham" is unsmoked pork leg. A "picnic ham" is a pork shoulder, either fresh or smoked.
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  #24  
Old 10-09-2007, 07:36 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 257
Default Porchetta Recipe Amendment

Although the original recipe did not include fennel seeds, my daughter has just pointed out that a teaspoon of fennel seeds were included in the stuffing at the demonstration she attended, and make it even nicer!

I've amended the recipe in the previous post, should you wish to include some.

Cheers, Paul.
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  #25  
Old 10-10-2007, 09:23 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 308
Default Re: Porchetta Recipe Amendment

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendo View Post
Although the original recipe did not include fennel seeds...

I've amended the recipe in the previous post, should you wish to include some.
Great idea! There are plenty of porchetta recipes that include sliced fennel, but I think the seeds are both easier and maybe even more tasty. Great idea (if I didn't say that already).
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  #26  
Old 10-10-2007, 01:34 PM
barbarian's Avatar
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: ny
Posts: 40
Default Re: Porchetta Recipe Amendment

correct .. no fennel seeds way to strong .
In tuscany we have finocchiona in the US this similar to dill but the stuff you find in the food stores is not fully grown you need the flowering part if you can grow it you got it ..
Porchetta is really really simple what really makes a big difference is the pig you use. At the farm I used to live near pisa we made it on a fire pit
once a month more or less...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendo View Post
Although the original recipe did not include fennel seeds, my daughter has just pointed out that a teaspoon of fennel seeds were included in the stuffing at the demonstration she attended, and make it even nicer!

I've amended the recipe in the previous post, should you wish to include some.

Cheers, Paul.
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  #27  
Old 10-28-2007, 09:37 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 308
Default Re: Porchetta

I recently adapted Paul's daughter's recipe to do a porchetta-style pork tenderloin. (I wouldn't normally use a tenderloin but it was all that I had available at the time.) For the fennel (didn't have anny fennel bulb, frond, or pollen available either) I used freshly-ground fennel seed. My theory was that grinding the seed would make it more of a background flavor. The spice/herb mixture was rubbed on the tenderloin and then it was wrapped and tied in a hollowed out bagguette that was drizzled with olive oil -then roasted to 160 deg F. After a rest, slice and serve. Perhaps not terribly traditional, but yummy.
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  #28  
Old 10-28-2007, 10:16 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 25
Default Re: Porchetta

What was the idea of roasting the loin in the bagguette? Did it end up being part of the dish? Was it crispy or soggy? I've never heard of this?
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  #29  
Old 10-28-2007, 04:42 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 308
Default Re: Porchetta

The baguette keeps the pork tenderloin from cooking too fast and drying out. I serve it sliced about 2 inches thick and leave the bread attached. It is crispy. The "guts" of the bread are pulled out so it is just the crust.
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  #30  
Old 10-28-2007, 04:50 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 25
Default Re: Porchetta

Thanks,
cool idea. I'll give it a try one of these days.
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