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billrd 04-18-2007 08:44 PM

English Fare
 
Next Monday April 23 is St. George's Day, The National Day of England. Could be a good excuse to try some traditional English fare in the oven.
Maybe Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding or a nice crusty Beef Wellington.
What do you think?

Bill

CanuckJim 04-19-2007 08:48 AM

Re: English Fare
 
Bill,

Last time I was in England I split my time between Kent and Lancashire. In both places, potato jackets seemed very popular. They're basically half a large baking potato that has the cooked insides scooped out and mixed with everything from English Cheddar to egg, prawns, herbs, you name it. Might be fun to try in your WFO. Chive, egg and cheese was my favorite. You could sprinkle grated cheese over the top of the mixture for a nice browned effect.

Jim

james 04-19-2007 01:19 PM

Re: English Fare
 
Bill,

How do you slow roast the roast beef, but bring back the heat for the Yorkshire pudding? You need serious heat for those, and you can't cook them ahead. Or can you?

Beef Wellington could work well. A moderate oven, puff pastry, rare beef; that could be excellent.

Carrie's family goes back as far as the eye can see in Yorkshire -- all four of her grandparents grew up within miles of each other. Which means we have two fair daughters.

I'm looking forward to hearing more. What about the gravy?
James

billrd 04-19-2007 10:31 PM

Re: English Fare
 
Jim

Those potatoes sound good. It reminds me of an oven contraption I've seen at our country shows (you would probably call them fairs) where they would have this big black box oven on a trailer with brass handles and a flue out the top serving baked in the jacket potatoes with a variety of savoury fillings. I seem to recall I had one once with a mexican filling of minced beef, chilli, melted cheese and sour cream. It was good. I don't how the oven was fired or powered, maybe LPG.

Bill

billrd 04-19-2007 10:40 PM

Re: English Fare
 
James
I had the same thought about the yorkies. You apparently need really hot fat to make them successful. I once saw a TV chef do them in a six hole muffin tin. He put about a half inch of pan drippings in each hole, heated it in the oven then half filled the holes with the batter and back into the oven. As you say the WFO may not be hot enough at a roasting temperature. They probably could be made in advance and warmed towards the end of the roast.

I think I might run with the Beef Wellington on this occasion. I think traditionally it is often served with a madiera wine flavoured gravy. Have to make this in the kitchen I think.

I,ll keep you informed.

Bill

billrd 04-22-2007 11:28 PM

Re: English Fare
 
I cooked the Beef Wellington on Sunday for lunch and it worked out well. I bought a 750 gram fillet of beef from the local butcher. It was the biggest he had but it was just enough for 4 people. I browned it on all sides in a hot pan & let it cool. I fryed off some chopped mushroom, onion & garlic till it was fairly dry. This mixture was spread over the centre of a sheet of puff pastry dough which was then used to encase the beef. Gave it it a brush with beaten egg & milk and then into the oven. The pastry started to brown fairly quickly (oven still a bit too hot) so I kept turning the dish until it was golden on all sides then covered with foil to shield it till it was done.
The pastry was crisp and the meat was beautifully tender and moist. Served it with a port wine gravy and roasted vegetables.
Used rest of heat to bake an apple pie for dessert.
Good food, good friends, top day.

Bill

CanuckJim 04-23-2007 05:28 AM

Re: English Fare
 
Bill,

Sound fab. It's always great to hear of people using their oven like this, because it inspires all of us to get cooking things other than pizza and bread. Next time you do this dish, may photo document it. Sounds like a good addition to the Wood-Fired Cooking eBook. James?

Jim

Hendo 04-23-2007 05:39 AM

Re: English Fare
 
Graham Kerr as the Galloping Gourmet, eh? Now there's a blast from the past!

I remember that series as probably the first 'cooking' show that I ever watched on TV. I was only a young lad at the time, but I recall such things as 'Angels in Orbit', Kerr's variation of 'Angels on Horseback', and a devine chicken liver dish he did with mushrooms and onions (and not much else). Sadly that recipe has long since vanished, and it was simply the best chicken liver dish I've ever experienced. Pity ....

Paul.

james 04-23-2007 05:43 AM

Re: English Fare
 
My brother-in-law's former wife served frozen Yorkshire puddings from Tesco's at Easter once. I wonder if that had something to do with it?

A brick oven would be great at making them earlier, when it's hot. Perfect, really. I wonder how they would taste if you kept them warm.

The Beef Wellington sounds great. Take a photo?

James

CanuckJim 04-23-2007 06:32 AM

Re: English Fare
 
James,

I've made Yorkshire puddings about a zillion times, and one thing has been consistent: you can't keep them warm. It's pretty well oven to table, otherwise they fall and get tough. Pity, but there you are.

Jim


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