#21  
Old 01-14-2008, 10:32 PM
james's Avatar
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

How many folks use parchment in their WFO? I just wrestle with the wet dough using lots of flour and an aluminum peel -- though that may explain my odd-shaped loaves. Maybe we need a poll. Parchment or no?

My guess is that a light baguette in a 550ºF oven will be ready in about 10 -12 minutes.

We need photos to savour the moment. It's a great recipe.
James
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  #22  
Old 01-14-2008, 11:38 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Quote:
Originally Posted by gjbingham View Post

How the heck to you pronounce the name of this bread? My French is lousy. Can anybody give me a phonetic pronunciation?


George
Pahn-ah-lawn-see-n ............................

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  #23  
Old 01-15-2008, 06:23 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Dutch, James, George,

Inishta has it about as close as it gets for a phonetic pronunciation, though my French is rusty enough. I agree that at 550, these breads should take about 12 minutes. Use good steam at the beginning and vent halfway through. Dave, venting the steam produces a better and more caramelized crust, but this is a matter of experimentation and taste.

I do bake them at higher temps, in the 650 to 700 range, where they take about 7 to 8 minutes. Conventional blade slashing does not work with such a wet dough, so, as Reinhart sort of recommends, I use kitchen shears held at a very shallow angle to snip triangles down the length. Sometimes works beautifully, sometimes not. I never use parchement paper for these loaves, but no particular reason beyond extra steps. Instead, using a fine meshed seive, I thoroughly but thinly coat the peel with brown rice flour. Like pizza, speed is an issue. These are rustic loaves, so I don't worry all that much about shaping. This is a very popular bread; far superior, in my opinion, to conventional baguette dough, so maybe a video clip is in order? It can be tricky to make and form, or at least it takes practice.

Jim
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Last edited by CanuckJim; 01-15-2008 at 06:24 AM. Reason: error
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  #24  
Old 01-15-2008, 07:56 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Good information from all. Thanks for the lesson.

I've got a perforated metal tray, shaped to hold three loaves. I got it at King Arthur Flour a few years back. I think I will try that for three of the loaves and a peel for three. We'll see what happens.

George
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  #25  
Old 01-15-2008, 08:18 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Ive tried this recipie, as well as the no-kneed recipie, and both times came out with beautiful loaves. With that said I was a little put off by the crumb and was wondering if it wasnt right, or if it just wasnt what I am used to. I did have the large irregular air pockets, but the moisture level was very high. I would say that it was undercooked except the internal temp was 200deg. and it wasnt doughy. The first time I made the Pain the crumb was almost clear. Is this something that I need to get used to, or am I doing it wrong?
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  #26  
Old 01-15-2008, 08:36 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

ED,

The internal temp was too low. You should be looking for at least 205 F. You need a full bake with these, so don't be afraid to put them back on the hearth, near the door, once you've reached the right internal temp to set and color the crust a bit more. These breads have a creamy texture and the interior surface of the pockets is shiny and possibly tan in color. These are all good things that show the gluten has been properly developed.

George,

You'll find that the bottom crust develops more fully and differently if you bake directly on the hearth.

Jim
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  #27  
Old 01-15-2008, 07:57 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Jim,
Thanks for the suggestion. Too late for bake number two, but I'm not giving up. The four loaves baked in the tray were definitely inferior to those baked directly on the hearth. The bread was really sweet and had big big holes, but once again, the oven cooled off to quickly. I think there's still H2O in the vermiculte insulation below the floor, perhaps wicking in from all the rain we've had lately...... My best guess anyway.

I was kind of pissed off, so I refired the oven for an hour and did 3 loaves of ciabatta about 20 -30 minutes after cleaning the oven of coals. I burned the heck out of them. The oven was still hot enough 3 hours later to make my next load of firewood smoke, so moisture situation may be improving.

I'll keep trying!

G.
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  #28  
Old 01-21-2008, 01:43 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

After nursing my yeast culture for the last 6 weeks or so I think it's finally coming around. I had to put this loaf back in the oven as it wasn't quite done, but as usual didn't get a true final pic. The taste is definitely on the sourdough range though. Also it took pretty much overnight to double in size.

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  #29  
Old 01-21-2008, 05:27 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Grease
You should repeat this and take a picture of the loaf sliced...
How did you grow your culture?
Inquiring minds would like to know I'm sure!
Dutch
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  #30  
Old 01-21-2008, 07:15 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

The culture survived by feeding every 2-4 days, straight up flour and sugars





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