#11  
Old 03-27-2006, 07:24 PM
Peasant
 
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James---Fran and I started building an ark. I guess it's better to get rain now and have a dry August and September for the grapes to ripen and not mildew. We're trying to pour an additional pad onto our patio to accomodate our crush party, maybe next week? We will be meeting with some friends this week-end and I will figure out how many people we will have for the cooking demo. We're looking forward to seeing you again and learning more about the oven.---Mel
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  #12  
Old 11-29-2007, 08:43 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

I can't wait to try pain a l'ancienne. After pulling it from the refrigerator on day 2, how long does it take to proof and be ready? My house is 65ish at this time of year. Thanks again.

Fred
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  #13  
Old 12-15-2007, 10:34 AM
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Post Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Has anyone tried a pain a l'ancienne a la Reinhart in the Bread Baker's Apprentice using 20-30% fresh ground whole wheat flour in combination with 70-80% Caputo at 80+% hydration? I would guess that a higher hydration would be needed to fully hydrate the whole wheat. (I'll give it a try and see.)

I personally like to make pain a l'ancienne using a 50/50 mix of giusto's baker's choice and caputo. It appeals to me because it comes out with a more puffy, shinier open crumb than just 100% giusto's.
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  #14  
Old 12-17-2007, 09:47 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

I tried this recipe over the weekend.

I must say, it is very wet!

A bit scary, but lots of flour and I managed to pull it off.

The loaves weren't perfect, but they sure were tasty.

Here's some pics.

Dave
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  #15  
Old 12-17-2007, 10:13 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Dave,

You did just fine. The dough is so wet that only minimal shaping is possible, but, hey, it's suppose to make rustic loaves, and that's what you got. Good crumb there. It does take practice, and you have to be quick, but the results are well worth the effort. I use a long, narrow, flexible, floured spatula, sometimes called an icing spatula, to slide under the loaves and then lift them onto a well floured peel. To flour the peel evenly, I used a very fine meshed stainless steel seive. That way, the layer is of even thickness, with no gaps.

Jim
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  #16  
Old 12-17-2007, 10:21 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

Way to go Dave,

The ultra high hydration dough is a goopy mess, but it sure tastes great. I really like the way the crust develops.

Jim, how does crust carmelization work? Sometimes I get that golden crust that shines, and other times it's an ordinary dull brown. How do you control that?

James
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  #17  
Old 12-17-2007, 10:33 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

James,

I think you'll find that retardation helps break out grain sugars, and that's what caramelizes on the crust for those shiny bits. If you flour is not quite fresh, or the gluten percentage is low, you'll probably get dusty brown rather than shiny golden. Lots of variables here, though, including baking at too high a heat or too little steam.

Jim
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  #18  
Old 12-17-2007, 10:38 AM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

I am new to this steam technique.

When I cooked these loaves I misted water into the oven with a hand sprayer for about 10-12 seconds. Then I put the loaves in and shut the door.

I had a therm probe stuck in one loaf and took them out when the internal temp hit 205f.

I never vented the oven during cooking. The crust was crunchy on the outside and the bread moist and chewy on the inside.

Am I using the right technique?

BTW the oven was about 550f.

Thanks

Dave
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  #19  
Old 01-14-2008, 09:00 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

I have couple of questions on this one....

I was going to bake this recipe from the Bread Baker's Apprentice today. The weather was un-Godly. I decided to put it off for a day and let the retarded dough sit in the 'fridge, as it's supposed to be clear tomorrow. So anyway, my questions:

- How the heck to you pronounce the name of this bread? My French is lousy. Can anybody give me a phonetic pronunciation?

- My recipe calls for parchment paper into the oven, rather than trying to move the loaves by hand (I presume). Do you recommend this in a WFO?

- The recipe calls for turning the oven down in mid-bake from 500/550 to 400 (450?). How much time in a 500/550 degree oven do you recommend. (sorry Jim, if it's in your e-book. My wife's got the laptop with your recipes on it).

Thanks in advance.
George
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  #20  
Old 01-14-2008, 10:06 PM
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Default Re: Pain a l'ancienne

The pronounciation part has me confused as well...maybe there is a French speaker on the forum that could help...or Jim maybe!!!...
I have used parchment in the WFO with good results...it chars and gets very fragile but you can do it...I have sent some of these really wet rustic loaves into the oven on pans and then when I vent the oven I remove the loaves from the pans and place them on the hearth...
as far as the baking time...at 550 it should be in the 12 to 15 minute range...20 minutes at most
Best
Dutch
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