#11  
Old 12-15-2008, 08:56 AM
jwnorris's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 228
Default Re: Overnight proofing

Veering slightly back toward proofing, I have a dilemma. I mixed a batch of bread last night [Sunday] with the intent of baking Monday afternoon. It is sitting in the fridge, ready to go. It is now raining cats and dogs here with no end in sight.

As I will not have the time to bake until Friday or Saturday, what should I do? Can I leave it proofing in the frig that long?

J W

Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-15-2008, 09:02 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 161
Default Re: Overnight proofing

JW - you can probably leave it, but it will get more of a sourdough flavor. you can also make the bread dough and freeze it.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-15-2008, 03:17 PM
james's Avatar
Brick Oven Merchant
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pebble Beach, CA
Posts: 4,648
Default Re: Overnight proofing

Hey JW,
I can't help here -- but I will be interested to hear what folks have to say. Amber, the bread getting more sour makes a lot of sense, and think you would have to use plastic wrap to keep it from getting a serious skin.

James
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-15-2008, 04:01 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 161
Default Re: Overnight proofing

True, and you can keep it in a zip-lock bag to really keep the air out. The sour flavor comes from the yeast dying. It's like a lazy person's sourdough (no starter) but it can taste pretty good.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-15-2008, 04:02 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 161
Default Re: Overnight proofing

If anyone cares for more information on that concept, there's this book Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day. The authors use the fridge and no knead theory to make some pretty good bread. I'm sure that it could be cooked in the WFO to make it even better!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-15-2008, 04:07 PM
james's Avatar
Brick Oven Merchant
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pebble Beach, CA
Posts: 4,648
Default Re: Overnight proofing

Is the theory that you are doing a long proofing in the refrigerator, and then bring the dough out before baking to shape the loaf and do the final proofing?

Or, do you store the shaped loaf that long. I will have to look up "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day." I've been the cover, but not read the book.

Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Bread Book is on my Xmas wish list.
James
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12-15-2008, 04:10 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 161
Default Re: Overnight proofing

Mmmm Peter Reinhart..... The basic premise is that you mix flour, water, yeast, and salt (I can't remember the ratio) into a wet dough in a sealable, but not airtight, container. You leave it to rise for 2+ hours at room temp, until it just begins to fall (the yeast begins to die) and then you can bake with it or keep it in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. when you're ready to cook, bring some out and let 'rise' for 40 minutes while the oven heats. then the dough is placed in an oven with boiling water and the steam cooks the bread. It's good and nice to have dough in the fridge for whenever. I made it a lot when I first bought the book, but much less so now.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-16-2008, 07:37 PM
Dutchoven's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 931
Default Re: Overnight proofing

JW
Did you just put it in the fridge as a bulk fermentation or are they shaped loaves. If it was a bulk ferment you can probably leave it but you would want to cover it tightly expecially if it is in a regularly used fridge. If you have done the final shaping you could freeze them...then you could do like the average megamart bakers and thaw, proof and then bake!!!
Best
Dutch

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwnorris View Post
Veering slightly back toward proofing, I have a dilemma. I mixed a batch of bread last night [Sunday] with the intent of baking Monday afternoon. It is sitting in the fridge, ready to go. It is now raining cats and dogs here with no end in sight.

As I will not have the time to bake until Friday or Saturday, what should I do? Can I leave it proofing in the frig that long?

J W

__________________
"Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity. " Charles Mingus
"Build at least two brick ovens...one to make all the mistakes on and the other to be just like you dreamed of!" Dutch
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-16-2008, 07:57 PM
Dutchoven's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 931
Default Re: Overnight proofing

James
Excellent book! I ot it for Christmas last year. Some really interesting techniques.

Amber
The method of long cool fermentation does create a far more flavorful bread but, it is not necessarily the result of expired yeast. Most of the flavor in bread is the result of bacteria. When you mix dough, amylase enzymes break down the starches into complex sugars which are then converted into simpler sugars by maltase, which the yeasts are able to consume. The bacteria(most famous is lactobacillus sanfransciscencis) is then able to feed on the products of the yeasts. Depending on the particular bacteria in the atmosphere as well as in the flour different flavors can develop. As well as by manipulating the amount of moisture in the starter. Use of potato water or onion juice in the water start the misture out with more starches...adding malt powder gives the dough more maltase which converts the complex sugars into the simple sugars for the yeast to consume. Lots of different options!
All the best!
Dutch
Quote:
Originally Posted by james View Post
Is the theory that you are doing a long proofing in the refrigerator, and then bring the dough out before baking to shape the loaf and do the final proofing?

Or, do you store the shaped loaf that long. I will have to look up "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day." I've been the cover, but not read the book.

Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Bread Book is on my Xmas wish list.
James
__________________
"Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity. " Charles Mingus
"Build at least two brick ovens...one to make all the mistakes on and the other to be just like you dreamed of!" Dutch
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-17-2008, 05:30 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 161
Default Re: Overnight proofing

Dutch, thanks for correcting me. I'd always understood that when the bread dough stops rising and starts collapsing that the yeast was finished. One way or the other the ABin5 makes one tasty loaf!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Final proofing Batard or oval james Hearth Bread and Flatbread 8 10-30-2008 08:47 AM
Water/weather proofing layer? Balthazar Tools, Tips and Techniques 3 09-29-2008 04:56 AM
Proofing - raising questions???? nissanneill Hearth Bread and Flatbread 77 03-16-2008 09:33 AM
Weather proofing Chimney - gabled roof Ken524 Design Styles, Chimneys and Finish 4 11-13-2007 01:58 AM
Proofing Preferences CanuckJim Get Cooking 2 02-27-2006 05:24 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:33 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC