#11  
Old 12-12-2010, 11:25 AM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by GianniFocaccia View Post
Just Google Naan recipe.
Good idea....This is what I found:
Quote:
from Cooking Light


Naan, one of the daily breads of India, is dense and chewy, almost like focaccia but thinner. If you don't have a pizza peel, use the back of a baking sheet to transfer the dough to a hot pizza stone. You can also bake naan on a heavy baking sheet lined with parchment paper.


Yield: 8 servings


Ingredients
  • 1 teaspoon dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup warm water (100° to 110°)
  • 1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt
  • 2 1/4 cups bread flour, divided
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Cooking spray
  • 4 tablespoons cornmeal, divided
Preparation

Dissolve yeast in warm water in a large bowl; let stand 5 minutes. Stir in yogurt. Lightly spoon flours into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Add 1/2 cup bread flour and whole wheat flour to yeast mixture; stir with a whisk until smooth. Cover and let rise in a warm place (85°), free from drafts, 2 hours (batter will be bubbly, lacy, and weblike).
Stir in salt and oil. Add 1 1/2 cups bread flour (1/2 cup at a time); stir with a wooden spoon (dough will become very difficult to stir).

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead until smooth and elastic (about 10 minutes); add enough of remaining bread flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, to prevent dough from sticking to hands (dough will feel tacky). Place dough in a large bowl coated with cooking spray, turning to coat top. Cover and let rise in a warm place (85°), free from drafts, 2 hours or until doubled in size. (Press 2 fingers into dough. If indentation remains, the dough has risen enough.)

Place pizza stone on the bottom rack in oven. Preheat oven to 500°.
Punch dough down; turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Cover and let rest 5 minutes.
Divide dough into 8 equal portions. Working with 1 portion at a time, (cover remaining dough to keep from drying), stretch each portion into a 6-inch oval. Cover and let rest 5 minutes.
Make indentations in top of dough portions using the handle of a wooden spoon or your fingertips; cover and let rise 20 minutes.

Place 2 dough portions on the back of a pizza peel dusted with 1 tablespoon cornmeal. Slide onto preheated pizza stone or baking sheet lined with parchment. Bake at 500° for 6 minutes or until lightly browned. Repeat with remaining dough and cornmeal. Serve immediately.

I'm going to try this one

Last edited by Lburou; 12-12-2010 at 11:40 AM.
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  #12  
Old 12-12-2010, 10:16 PM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

1 1/2 tsps dry yeast
1 cup warm water
1 1/2 tsps sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
6 tbsps butter
3 tbsps yoghurt

3 teaspoons onion seeds option to sprinkle on top

Key to naan is to include lots of butter and yoghurt in it to make sure it has a soft consistency. You could drop the yoghurt and water and replace with 1.5 cups of buttermilk.
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  #13  
Old 12-13-2010, 05:55 AM
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Thumbs up Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by sacwoodpusher View Post
1 1/2 tsps dry yeast
1 cup warm water
1 1/2 tsps sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
6 tbsps butter
3 tbsps yoghurt

3 teaspoons onion seeds option to sprinkle on top

Key to naan is to include lots of butter and yoghurt in it to make sure it has a soft consistency. You could drop the yoghurt and water and replace with 1.5 cups of buttermilk.
We'll have to try this recipie too. There seems to be a lot of variability in the different ways to make naan
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  #14  
Old 12-13-2010, 06:15 AM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Sounds like you can do Naan in the WFO no problem.
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  #15  
Old 07-21-2011, 05:16 AM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Hi all,

Just come across this thread and thought it was a great read! I have a tandoor at home and have been making naan bread for a while. There are so many naan dough recipes out there!! It can get a bit confusing.

A key ingredient for naan dough is the yoghurt. After talking to a few Indian chefs, I have learnt that the restaurants do not use egg or yeast in their recipes. The egg makes it too expensive, and using yeast simply makes the process too time consuming. The leavening agent used in the dough is a mixture of baking powder and bicarb of soda. Baking powder contains bicarb of soda plus a few extra ingredients to yield a slightly different effect over the bicarb of soda alone.

Perhaps the most important tip to cooking great naan is the temperature – if the temperature is too low all the moisture evaporates from the dough as it cooks and you end up with a naan biscuit!! The temperature should be as hot as possible without burning the side of the nann that sticks to the clay pot wall of the tandoor.

The temperature required can vary with the dough recipe used, but it will typically be about 300oC.

You do not generally measure the temperature of a tandoor precisely. One tends to talk in terms of low, medium and hot. Naan is cooked at the hot end of the scale. After using a tandoor a few times you soon get a feel for this.

Once you get the dough consistency right, it will stick easily to the clay pot wall and come off easily when the dough is cooked. If the dough is too dry, the naan dough will simply not stick to the clay pot wall, and if the dough is too wet, it will stick, but you will probably take off a bit of clay when you try and scrape the cooked naan off the clay pot wall.

Naan dough is quite a different beast to pizza dough (which I also make to cook pizza in the tandoor – but that's a different story).

While this may all sound a bit complicated, it is really not in practice. I think naan is perhaps one of the simplest and most rewarding breads to make. It cooks in under a minute, you can cook multiple naan at a time in the tandoor, and they taste great!!

Cheers

p.s. I understand that the “pillow” used to help apply the nann dough on to the clay pot wall of the tandoor is traditionally called a “gaddi”.
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Old 07-21-2011, 09:28 PM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Hi All,

My wife and I made naan bread on Monday and it was great. I learned a lot about naan recipes by viewing tandoor websites and reading the manufacturer/distributor information and recipes for use in their products. It seems that baking powder is added as insurance so that the bread actually rises and bubbles if either the yeast or soda/yogurt don't do their jobs. Also, many cooks don't make the yeast recipe naan breads and one website stated authentic recipes don't use yeast at all. Having learned all that, I made the baking powder/yeast recipe and it was fantastic. Soft, tender, pillows, of hot bread to go with our chicken tikka and veggie kababs.

The bread pad is indeed referred to as a gaddi. Google "gaddi" to find other meanings. I have first hand experience deconstructing a gaddi and it was a genuine original made of long grass leaves inside and two wrappings of cotton cloth on the outside. The cloths are tied together one over the other. The outside cloth can be laundered when it becomes soiled. The long knots on the back of the gaddi provide a place for beginners to slide their fingers under to get a good grip. Notice that the naan cook moistened both the gaddi and naan with a little water from a bowl. This is essential for keeping the naan on the pad and also helps to stick the bread to the hot clay.

Two tandoor sites I visited provided instructions on how to wipe the clay walls of the tandoor with a light salt solution. This is supposed to help the bread stick. I think it helps cure the clay walls by slightly filling pores in the clay surface.

Tandoors are "black ovens" the charcoal is placed directly in the bottom of the pot and allowed to become fully involved before cooking. I checked temperatures during full heat and found them to vary from middle to top with the hottest area being midway above the air vent. The highest temperature on this particular tandoor was 640 deg F at that location. The naans stuck perfectly....um, mostly....... except for one. This is when I learned that the gaddi should be slightly moistened so the naan will not slide off and into the belly of the dragon. Otherwise, success on our first try.

Cheers,
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  #17  
Old 07-21-2011, 09:38 PM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Congrats, Bob! Did you get your clay pot tandoor-ready already?
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  #18  
Old 07-21-2011, 09:56 PM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Hi John,

Yes, ordered it on Monday and it arrived on Thursday, all the way from a distributor in Nottingham, England. It was just too easy to buy one than contemplate a build around a clay pot. The clay pots are expensive and shipping is nearly the same as for a finished oven, and it has a nicely crafted stainless steel barrel around it, and wheels, and a nifty set of tools, and a shiny brass handle on the lid, and a weatherproof cover, etc, etc, etc.

Cheers,
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  #19  
Old 07-22-2011, 07:17 AM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

azpizzanut,
Did you buy the Puri tandoor or Golden? Which model?
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  #20  
Old 07-22-2011, 09:37 AM
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Default Re: Naan in a tandoor oven

Hi Ebbro,

We got the Puri SS2 Ultima.

We considered the economy model that has a painted steel drum. Lucky for us we had a little windfall $ and used it for the stainless steel model. We'd have been happy with either. The staff was professional and made the experience a good one. Mr. Puri sent a personal "thank you" email.

Cheers,
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