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  #11  
Old 09-18-2012, 11:14 AM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

It is something to think about.. I know the city will want their $ and there would be some course like "How not to poison your customers" followed by 5 yes/no questions, but from what I'm seeing, real artisan bread is getting hot, pardon the pun..

I know that once you get involved in whatever you notice that there is more around than you had realized.

Like seeing that 1973 lime green AMC Gremlin or 1975 Paser and then seeing it over and over, Deja vu!

Bread is like that only in a good way..



Chris
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  #12  
Old 09-18-2012, 11:42 AM
WJW WJW is offline
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

It is something to think about.

I could see it being a neat sideline. I'm pretty sure I'd have a tough time justifying (from a financial standpoint) the idea of not working on Fridays as an attorney so I could bake bread and sell at a farmer's market saturday. That being said, I could see doing it a few times to see how it goes and maybe seeing if one of my daughters were interested in helping out and giving selling a shot. I like my saturdays around the pool too much to spend them at a farmers market...but I would do the baking.


Bill
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  #13  
Old 09-18-2012, 11:48 AM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

What sorts of firewood do you have in your area, I'm currently burning Almond, but would burn Citrus if I had a choice..

Chris
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2012, 12:22 PM
WJW WJW is offline
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

The big three in this area are oak, avacado, and eucalyptus.

Oak is generally pretty pricey although I can get it for 150 a cord right now from a farmer friend who is changing some orchard stuff around, clearing areas, etc. Don't know how long that will last. I've paid as much as $275 in the past.

It's funny you say that about citrus. We have tons of lemon orchards in this area and after about ten years or so production drops off and most guys will plow them up and replant. So quanities of it are available from time to time. That being said, as far as I know, I have never burned it. But that same farmer friend of mine took out a few hundred acres of lemons last year which were past their prime. He's offered me all the cords I want for $150 each split and delivered to my driveway. I've got a cord coming tomorrow.

I hear people say bad things about Eucalyptus but I think it is probablly my favorite wood. Contrary to what I have read on the net, it is not smokey at all. I am burning oak right now and the oak is most definitely putting off more smoke than well seasoned euc. I smell absolutely no funky oils or aromatics. The issue may be simply one of seasoning, or it may be the particular variety. But here in southern cal we have vast quanities of Euc that were origionally brought over from Austrailia for railroad ties. They were then planted as wind breaks in all the ag areas. So the stuff is everywhere. I have been burning it my entire adult life and it's great in my opinion. The BTU's per cord on Euc is higher than anything but white oak. It is super dense and burns forever.

Avocado burns bright, but doesn't last very long. I like cooking with it though but have never done so in a WFO.

Before I realized that my farmer buddy had oak and lemon available at 150 per cord for me, I told my gardner to be on the look out for good wood. So yesterday he pulls up and tells me that he got his hands on two-plus cords of some kind of non-fruiting pear tree wood. He said if I paid for the rental of the hydraulic splitter and paid his laborer's hourly, I could have it for free. The splitter is about sevety-five bucks for the day. I figure the laborer will be about $125 for the day. So that's more than two cords for a couple hundred. It's green, but I can let it sit for a year.

So now I have a 3/4s of a cord of oak on the side yard. I have two cords of pear sitting in the driveway waiting to be split this weekend. And I have a cord of split, seasoned lemon arriving tomorrow. Obviously, a lot more wood than I need but it all sort of fell on me at once.

I'm curious to see how the pear and lemon do.

Bill
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  #15  
Old 09-18-2012, 01:34 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

I was hoping to hear that some Citrus was around in your area.. I guess my attachment to citrus relates to all of the fireplace fires that we had when I was a child were citrus. The smell of the wood burning brings back great memories.. With your recommendations I'll give a load of Euc a try and I may have to journey north to bring home a load of lemon or orange..

Chris
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  #16  
Old 09-18-2012, 03:53 PM
WJW WJW is offline
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

Chris...I wasn't thinking when I said "here in So. Cal. we have lots of Euc..." Obviously, orange county is more "so cal" than us up here and you know very well that there is eucalyptus around. Duh...


Bill
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  #17  
Old 09-18-2012, 04:00 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

I've avoided euc in the past for fear that it was inferior, relative to poping or smoking or whatever. The fruit woods have seemingly had high ratings for both burning for the oven and using the coals for the BBQ, so I've stayed this direction. As I explained, I grew up with a orange wood fire in the fireplace and lived next to Orange groves. Aside from the Smudge Pot mornings, I loved running through the groves.

I'll give Euc a try.

Thanks Bill!

Chris

Last edited by SCChris; 09-18-2012 at 07:10 PM.
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  #18  
Old 08-25-2013, 03:30 AM
dimitrisbizakis's Avatar
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

WJW could please tell me how much sourdough and in what hydration did you use for a total 4 hours frement?
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  #19  
Old 09-23-2013, 11:55 PM
WJW WJW is offline
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Default Re: More Bread, screwing with proof times, and blow-outs

Dimitri:

The sourdough recipe which is my starting point is a combination of the recipes provided by Faith and Jay and can be found at posts #15 and #17 at this thread:

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f11/...ugh-17654.html (My first attempt at bread and making sourdough starter.)

I rely on the timing and s&f schedule from Faith, but the hydration levels and bakers percentage amounts come from Jay. The recipe there is for 60% hydration. I have tweaked it up to around 70...but like the results best at around 63%-65% hydration. Doesn't stick to my bannetons, easy to handle, and a nice open crumb.

I'm not quite sure about the four hour question...My pre-ferment the night before is typically about ten hours....then I mix up the dough by hand and do a bulk fermentation of around three hours or a bit less (with about three S&F's during that period), then I do loaf formation into bannetons with about a proof time of about two and a half hours (or maybe a bit less) before the first loaves go into the oven.

I typically do about twenty to thirty loaves which range from 750 grams to 1100 grams.

The pre-ferment is done on my kitchen counter over night at 100% hydration and at approximately 65-70 degrees F. The bulk ferment and post-loaf formation proof is usually at around 75-77 degrees in the room I use for bulk fermentation and loaf proofing....but it is a very large piece of dough (approx. 50 lbs) and I think it changes temp very slowly.

My flour bags are stored in my drafty garage and I mix dough in the morning....so the flour is usually anywhere between 55 to 65 degrees when it gets incorporated into dough. The water I use is straight from the faucet and I use enough warm to bring the temp to around 80 degrees. My guess is that by the time everything is mixed together just before my delayed salt addition, the temp of the flour is pretty close to 75 degrees F. I think it stays that way or warms up a bit through the bulk fermentation. After the loaves are formed they are much smaller and warm up in that environment to the ambient 77 or so. Or at least that's what I think....

With all of that said....if my starter is not amped up and very very active (with twice a day feeding schedule for a couple of days before the bake), the entire process is likely to fall apart...slow way down, and give me real headaches. But when the starter is happy....everything roles nicely along.

Bill
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