#11  
Old 11-28-2007, 07:00 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Looks really good...good color...irregeular crumb...nice job. the transfer is sometimes tough to handle. Flipping is sometimes the best way. Our method has settled on proofing the loaves in oval baskets lined with a linen cloth and lots of flour. We then flip them onto the peel or to a sheet pan(if for some reason we are doing them inside). The only thing is, they don't get the normal bumpy appearance as traditional ciabatta. You should be OK as long as you don't deflate the dough...use a lot of flour. Can you expound a bit on your formula and method? Have you purchased the e-books form FBravo on hearth bread, pizza and wood oven cooking. They are free or you can pay a little for them as a donation to Habitat for Humanity.
Best
Dutch
Dutch
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  #12  
Old 11-28-2007, 07:32 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Thanks Dutch. Yes, I am using the FB formula, both for bread and for pizza.

Fred
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  #13  
Old 11-28-2007, 07:38 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Another question - does anyone have a recipe/formula for italian rolls - rosette or similar - good crust, semi hollow?

Fred
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  #14  
Old 11-28-2007, 07:55 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Great thread.

Very informative.

I've got to try these higher hydration recipes...

Seems these colder weekends will be perfect for hiding in the house and playing with dough.
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  #15  
Old 11-28-2007, 08:23 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

FredJana
I have a formula for an Italian loaf, very soft in the crumb and you can make the crust as crisp or as soft as you like. Let me know if you're interested! I think the rosette is a basic dough and then just shaped into rose shape.

Asuda
Will love to help when you get going!
Best
Dutch
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  #16  
Old 11-28-2007, 08:38 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Fredjana,

Don't have much to add to what Dutch said about steam, but I would second the suggestion to use a cheapo garden sprayer rather than the hose. Too much steam will result in flat bread, but, then again, too little steam will result in flat bread. It's a fine balance between enough steam at the beginning, then venting the steam at about halfway through. My method is a bit different than Dutch's, but we likely get the same results. I steam my 4'x3' oven for about 15 seconds before loading then put on the door. Once loaded, I steam upwards toward the dome and the back of the oven for about 10 seconds, immediately replacing the door. If the loaves will take, say, 20 minutes for a full bake, I vent the steam at 10 minutes. By that stage, full oven spring has occurred and finishing the bake in a dry environment sets the crust. However, it you want crustier crust, vent earlier. With some breads, indeed, you should vent the steam as soon as the loaves show color, but this is a judgment call that takes time to learn.

Dutch is exactly right, each oven is a bit different (even one 90 to another), and it takes trial and error to get it right. Your oven is smaller than mine, so the spray duration will likely be less.

Jim
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  #17  
Old 11-28-2007, 11:52 AM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Dutch, I am interested in your formula. Thanks again.

Fred

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchoven View Post
FredJana
I have a formula for an Italian loaf, very soft in the crumb and you can make the crust as crisp or as soft as you like. Let me know if you're interested! I think the rosette is a basic dough and then just shaped into rose shape.

Asuda
Will love to help when you get going!
Best
Dutch
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  #18  
Old 11-29-2007, 08:48 PM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Dutch/Jim/James: You guys are a tremendous help and I feel as though this new hobby will soon consume me. I have found that my ciabatta crust is crisp when it comes out of the oven, but quickly softens. Am I not venting the oven enough? In other words, if I vent longer, does the bread stay crisper longer? I am able to reheat the bread the following day with a nice crisp, but almost brittle crust. Does venting longer result in a deeper crust?
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  #19  
Old 11-29-2007, 10:50 PM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

All bread tends to soften a bit when it cools...even leaner varieties...you could vent a bit sooner and get more crispness...just have to watch the color...you may want to vent your oven when you see color develop...we'll see what the others think...I am going out of town so I will get you the Italian loaf/Rosette Roll formula when I return
Dutch
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  #20  
Old 11-29-2007, 11:42 PM
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Default Re: Dough Hydration question

Jim made a good comment a while back that a slightly cooler and drier oven will give you a thicker, more crunchy crust on your loaves. The crust has more time to form before it gets too dark, and you get that more rustic, chewy, crunchy crust that a lot of us like.

Now, getting from a hot and steamy oven at the start of the baking, to a moderate and dry oven to finish your loaves -- I guess that's where the magic comes in.

Keep experimenting; I think this is a very good thread, with a lot to learn.
James
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