#21  
Old 04-02-2010, 03:11 PM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

My wife likes a crunchy pizza. Since I have not yet gotten my "real" oven off the ground I have been making do with stones etc. In order to increase the crunch I use about 7% Semolina flour. This also makes the dough slightly yellow. I have found that 10% semolina makes the pizza tough so I always use less than 10%.


Bruce
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Last edited by brokencookie; 04-02-2010 at 03:12 PM. Reason: Fat Fingers
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  #22  
Old 04-02-2010, 07:11 PM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

Thanks Bruce - very helpful info. Have loaded the 7% into the dough calculator and hope to make a batch later today (after I have bought some semilina flour). Excellent news that this is where the "yellowness" comes from. At last the secret has been revealed!! Do you have the complete recipe you use perhaps to put it all in perspective?

Good info also Jay - sourdough really is a science!! Is there a particular % of starter that you would recommend be added to pizza dough?
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  #23  
Old 04-02-2010, 10:55 PM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

The Games have begun...

Got some Durum Semolina flour and have mixed a batch of dough to try. All mixed and kneaded and leaving it to ferment at room temp to see how it turns out. Will check after an hr. So far only a slight off-white colour. Maybe needs more time to leach colouring from Semolina. Used very low hydration - 51% to mimic the bought texture. Used 45% starter (as per Reinhart) and did not include any IDY....
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  #24  
Old 04-03-2010, 04:07 AM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

UPDATE:
======

Undoubtedly one of the best - if not THE best dough that I have made. Silkiness like I have never been able to produce before, putty-like, crunch, golden baked colour and with just a perfect amount of rise. I have kept 2 x doughs back to test if they improve with time. I am sure they will. One thing that I know is that I will be developing this formula as my favourite pizza dough in future.

The sourdough provides the optimum amount of flavour and rise ... but the elusive "Yellowness" has not been explained. The 7% semolina suggested by Bruce seemed to be perfect and it provided an off-white colour but not to the level of the bought dough. I am reluctant to add more semolina at this stage but may experiment with different percentages later. I grabbed a pic which I will post shortly.
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Old 04-03-2010, 04:19 AM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

Pic of pizza as promised...

Pic of the Durum Semolina too.
Attached Thumbnails
Yellow Dough???????-cimg3787.jpg   Yellow Dough???????-cimg3788.jpg  
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  #26  
Old 04-03-2010, 04:57 AM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

The two heaped tablespoons of semolina for every 4 cups of pizza flour recipe that I've been using, works out to be almost exactly the 7% that you arrived at.It produces a base that is light but a bit crunchy. We started doing this about 6 months ago and now always do it this way.
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  #27  
Old 04-03-2010, 09:12 AM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

What colour is your dough?

I am just wondering if the dough I bought is made of "old dough" that may have become yellow over time when it is added to the new batch of dough.

I don't think that the relatively small amount of semolina I am using is going to produce a dough that is as yellow as the bought one so something else must be causing this phenomenon.

As an aside, this is a recipe by Jamie Oliver which includes semolina flour. Similar to the one I made - but without the sugar.

Pizza Dough

This is a fantastic, reliable, everyday pizza dough, which can also be used to make bread. It's best made with Italian Tipo "00" flour, which is finer ground than normal flour, and it will give your dough an incredible super-smooth texture. Look for it in Italian markets and good supermarkets. If using white bread flour instead, make sure it's a strong one that's high in gluten, as this will transform into a lovely, elastic dough, which is what you want. Mix in some semolina flour for a bit of color and flavor if you like.

Ingredients
7 cups strong white bread flour or Tipo "00" flour or 5 cups strong white bread flour or Tipo "00" flour, plus 2 cups finely ground semolina flour
1 level tablespoon fine sea salt
2 (1/4-ounce) packets active dried yeast
1 tablespoon raw sugar
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 1/2 cups lukewarm water

Sift the flours and salt onto a clean work surface and make a well in the middle. In a large measuring cup, mix the yeast, sugar and olive oil into the water and leave for a few minutes, then pour into the well. Using a fork, bring the flour in gradually from the sides and swirl it into the liquid. Keep mixing, drawing larger amounts of flour in, and when it all starts to come together, work the rest of the flour in with your clean, flour-dusted hands. Knead until you have a smooth, springy dough.

Place the ball of dough in a large flour-dusted bowl and flour the top of it. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and place in a warm room for about 1 hour until the dough has doubled in size.

Now remove the dough to a flour-dusted surface and knead it around a bit to push the air out with your hands - this is called punching down the dough. You can either use it immediately, or keep it, wrapped in plastic wrap, in the fridge (or freezer) until required. If using straightaway, divide the dough up into as many little balls as you want to make pizzas - this amount of dough is enough to make about six to eight medium pizzas.

Timing-wise, it's a good idea to roll the pizzas out about 15 to 20 minutes before you want to cook them. Don't roll them out and leave them hanging around for a few hours, though - if you are working in advance like this it's better to leave your dough, covered with plastic wrap, in the refrigerator. However, if you want to get them rolled out so there's 1 less thing to do when your guests are round, simply roll the dough out into rough circles, about 1/4-inch thick, and place them on slightly larger pieces of olive-oil-rubbed and flour-dusted aluminum foil. You can then stack the pizzas, cover them with plastic wrap, and pop them into the refrigerator.
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Last edited by heliman; 04-03-2010 at 07:35 PM.
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  #28  
Old 04-03-2010, 03:17 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

Hi Rossco!

The pizza sounds great. I may have to try using semolina. I usually only use of for pasta and for dusting the peel.

Way to go!
Jay
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  #29  
Old 04-03-2010, 03:30 PM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

Hi Splat!

We have taken a tangent from the yellow dough that probably deserves its own topic so it can be more concise.

In my experience and from what I hear almost all sourdoughs are similar to mine. There are supposedly some more robust strains - usually from Russia or the Middle East but I think the numbers I cited (which ARE based on my starter and experience) are pretty typical.

Don't kick yourself too hard. Sourdough is so damn variable (temp, humidity, flour, salt) (and I actually sometimes think yeast has moods!) that it is easy to not notice the patterns. I don't recall where I heard of shifting the expansion with temp but I don't think it is original. I have been doing it for about six years - mainly in the winter - and began after making bread that barely rose (too cold in the kitchen) (made hard giant hockey pucks). Yes, I know I could have used proofing box and all that but...I don't like to so....I just go with the temp I have and adapt. (And I do usually use a proofing box if the temp gets down to about 65. My yeast practically quits at that temp - never rise!)

WRT 8 hours to peak means 8 hours to proof. That is not my experience. My peak time for a 4X expansion is about 13 hours and I usually bake after about 7 to 10 hours after I make the final dough - about 3 to 4 hours from mixing to forming and about 4 to 5 hours to baking after forming. My forming time is usually fairly consistent. The proofing time can be pretty variable but I only let it grow by about 2/3 - not double.

I don't have Leaders book so I can't comment too much. Could be he has uniquely potent yeast. Could be he likes explosive loaves (underproofed loaves tend to explode a bit as a result of all the gas and alcohol in the dough that escapes as it bakes. It can't get out fast enough and the loaf "explodes".

Maybe I need to look at his book!

Good Luck!
Jay
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  #30  
Old 04-03-2010, 07:47 PM
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Default Re: Yellow Dough???????

Quote:
Originally Posted by texassourdough View Post
Hi Rossco!

The pizza sounds great. I may have to try using semolina. I usually only use of for pasta and for dusting the peel.

Way to go!
Jay
Hi Jay,

Yes it is certainly the best pizza dough I have made and worth trying yourself. The sourdough addition produces the perfect amount of rise, whereas my other doughs used to puff and tear within a few hrs of being on the bench. As a sourdough expert you will definitely be able to work on the best formula to use for maximum taste/rise for pizzas.

I did have to grapple with going "non-neo" buy I reasoned that the taste is the most important part of pizza so I need to do what I have to do to produce the best all round product. In this case, it's the addition of semolina. I reason too that if it's good enough for Brandi then it's....

I would like to hear your comments on the inclusion of this crispening addition once tested. Perhaps you will also declare "there's no going back" once you have sampled this delicious variation!!!
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