#11  
Old 05-10-2010, 06:58 PM
egalecki's Avatar
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Default Re: Flour Container

I freeze whole wheat but not white flour. I keep my white flour in a large food-grade plastic bin I bought at Sam's- it holds a whole 50 pound bag of bread flour just fine. I do usually freeze the whole bag overnight, though, to kill off the critters. (my husband does the same for his parrot food)

Since I've been freeze-killing the critters overnight, I haven't had any trouble with pantry moths at all.
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  #12  
Old 05-11-2010, 04:07 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

Actually, Shay, 65 to 72 is fine for regular flour (but not whole wheat). The flour will dry slowly in the freezer even in plastic (but it should be slower). It shouldn't make much difference which way you go if you have the room in the freezer. But keeping it out isn't a big deal either.

One thought Elizabeth. It takes a while for the cold to really penetrate the flour and it supposedly takes more than "just reaching" freezing to kill the eggs. It is my understanding you want it cold for about a day to be sure so two days may be the minimum advisable freezing time. OTOH, your experience suggests shorter can work!

Thanks!
Jay
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Old 05-11-2010, 05:27 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

Well, what usually happens is I put it in there and then a day or so later I think "hey, where's my new bag of flour?" so, overnight is really not an accurate time....

For real, though, it does make a big difference to freeze the little buggers. I hated pantry moths with a passion. All those nasty webs in things you ddn't think they'd invade.... ICK!
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Old 05-11-2010, 05:31 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

Oh, and I find that my whole wheat flour does get dried out over LONG periods of time in the freezer, (doesn't usually last that long), which is why I think it's important that people know what dough should FEEL like, not just do it by weight. If the flour is old, it needs more water to make good dough. You don't know that if you don't know what it should feel like.

That said, if I get to that point with flour, I usually get rid of it.

Same thing happens with rice, too, by the way. The older it is, the drier it is....
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Old 05-11-2010, 05:37 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

I freeze the flour for 2-days or so to kill the moths. Then it seems to last very well in zip-loc bags in a plastic tub (in a closet on the cool tile (on concrete) floor).

Chuck
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Old 05-11-2010, 07:13 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

I trying to convince my wife that a kitchen remodel will kill the pantry moths for good.. I'm sure that the new layout with cabnets and stone counter tops will take care of the problem. Only one limiting factor... $


Chris
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Old 05-11-2010, 08:21 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

Wow, you guys are really serious about these moths.. I can't say I've ever seen anything like what you're describing and we keep flour in our pantry for quite some time. Gross!
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Old 05-11-2010, 09:11 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

I have a few things that add to the problem.

1 - The Southern California weather provides what I'd guess is just about the perfect environment for hatching. Humid, warm weather all year long. An example; this, el Nino, year is that the tomato plants that never died. They stopped producing, but didn't die. BTW they have tomatoes set and I'll be getting a few pickings in the next week or so.

2 - A crappy pantry. Things get lost in the back and then found when they're full of hatchlings.

My kitchen layout is a mess.. No counter space and crappy storage.. Actually it was one of the reasons for building the WFO and eating area outside. The idea is to have this area to carry us through while the kitchen is gutted and rebuilt, as well as to enjoy the 200+ days a year that living outside is possible.

Chris

Last edited by SCChris; 05-11-2010 at 09:32 AM.
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  #19  
Old 05-11-2010, 09:24 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

Hi Elizabeth...

I find two troublesome critters. The moths and the little beetles. The moths are easier for me to manage. The little beetles love my weekly baking schedule for it gives them a reliable period for procreation and feeding between interruptions! Solution is probably to bake more! Yeah, that sounds good for everything but my waist!

And to add to the drying out things...beans too. All need more water and time to rehydrate with age. (Sort of like people, huh?) )

But like you say freeze in sealed bags and hold at room temp works well for flour!
Jay
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  #20  
Old 05-11-2010, 10:12 AM
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Default Re: Flour Container

Quote:
The one thing you might want to consider if you store flour in the freezer in the paper bags it comes in is that it will lose moisture. As a result it may require a hydration adjustment over time to compensate for the lost water.
When I got my 25kg bag of Caputo, I put half of it into paper sandwich bags in 500 gram portions, and stored it in the bottom drawer of the fridge. (It was too cold down there, and occasionally freezing potatos.) The other half I stored in a friends underused freezer.

The bags of flour quickly lost about 10-12 grams, presumably in moisture, and I prepared the dough based on the original 500g weight. The funny thing is that when I went back, and portioned the rest of the flour, those bags lost weight too.
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