Forno Bravo Community Cookbook

Roasted Onion and Pineapple Salad

pineapple1 pineappple2

 

As any Hawaiian pizza lover knows, pineapple is delicious when paired with salty, savory ingredients. This warm salad is a lighter, bread-less take on that idea.

3 red onions
3 T extra virgin olive oil
2 sprigs fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1 fresh pineapple
1 bunch lacinato kale
4 oz feta cheese
10 fresh mint leaves, chopped
salt and black pepper to taste

Cut off the ends of the onions and remove the outer peel, leaving the onions whole. Place the onions in the center of a large piece of foil. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Add the thyme and bay and wrap the onions tightly in the foil. Place near the coals in a moderate wood oven. You want the onions to slowly roast in their own juices, so the oven shouldn’t be too hot. Rotate occasionally, and cook until the onions are very soft and fragrant, 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hours, depending on your oven temp. When the onions are done, remove them from the foil and set aside, reserving any juices that have collected.

Meanwhile, prepare your pineapple. Cut off the top and bottom so that the pineapple will stand upright on your cutting board. Using a knife, cut off the outer skin in strips. Lay the pineapple on its side and cut 1/2 inch-thick rounds. Use a paring knife to cut the core out of the middle of each round. Toss the pineapple with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Place in a single layer in a roasting pan and cook in your wood oven until nicely caramelized, flipping once, about 5-8 minutes. Set aside.

Remove the stems from the kale and discard.  Roughly chop the leaves. Preheat a large wok or skillet in your wood oven. Add the remaining olive oil. When it starts to smoke, add the kale, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring constantly, until the kale is wilted, 2-3 minutes.

Using a sharp knife, gently cut the roasted onions into 1/2 inch rounds. To assemble the salad, shingle alternating layers of onion, pineapple and kale on a serving platter. Sprinkle the mint over the top, then the feta cheese. Drizzle with any remaining onion roasting juices and enjoy.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Roasted Sockeye Salmon With Braised Couscous, Roasted Green Beans, Heirloom Tomatoes, Basil

green beanssalmon

 

Here’s a recipe for making the most of your farmers market’s most ubiquitous offerings: If yours is anything like mine, green beans, tomatoes and basil are at just about every stand. I pickle half the green beans in this recipe, for even more variation in flavor and texture.

When it comes to salmon, in my opinion nothing beats sockeye for taste, texture and pure, simple beauty. If you can get your hands on it, try Alaskan Copper River sockeye. Sustainably wild-caught, Copper River sockeye will have a flesh that is almost ruby red in color, as well as an unparalleled flavor.

2 stalks celery
2 small carrots
1 yellow onion
2 cloves garlic
1 T butter
1 C Israeli couscous (you may also find it in the store as Palestinian couscous, ptitim or pearl pasta)
1 C white wine
3 C vegetable stock
1 lb green beans, washed and ends trimmed
1 C white wine vinegar
2 C water
1/4 C sugar
1 T salt
2 T pickling spices to your taste (garlic clove, thyme, bay, fennel seed, mustard seed, coriander, chili flake, etc.)
2 T vegetable oil
3-4 various heirloom tomatoes
1 oz fresh basil leaves
4 5-oz portions of salmon
extra virgin olive oil, to taste
salt and black pepper

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, start the couscous: Cut the celery, carrots and onion into a small dice and mince the garlic. In a large skillet or shallow, wide pot, melt the butter over medium-low heat. Add the mirepoix and garlic, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring often, until soft and fragrant, about 8 minutes. Add the couscous and toast for 1 minute. Add the wine and increase the heat to high. Allow the wine to reduce until the pan is almost dry, then add the stock. Cook until the couscous is tender, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

When your pot of water is boiling, blanch half of your green beans for 1 1/2 minutes. Remove and place in a single layer to cool. To pickle the remaining beans, combine the vinegar, water, sugar, salt and pickling spices in a pot. Bring to a boil. Add the remaining green beans and cook until slightly tender but still crunchy. Remove from the heat and allow the beans to cool in the pickling liquid.

While the beans are cooling, slice your heirlooms in whatever manner you find most appealing. I cut mine in quarters and then into thin slices that I could shingle on the plate. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

To roast the beans, heat 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil in a large roasting pan in your wood oven. You will want a hot oven for this procedure. Drain the pickled beans from the brine. When your oil is smoking, add the blanched fresh beans and the drained pickled beans to the pan. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the beans are just tender and have taken on some nice charred edges, about 4-5 minutes. Remove and set aside.

To cook your fish, heat the remaining vegetable oil in a saute pan in your wood oven. Season the fish with salt only. When the oil is smoking, add the fish to the pan and return to the oven. Sear the fish on one side only – the heat of your oven will be enough to cook the other side. Sockeye is best served medium, which means a skewer inserted into the center of the flesh should come out warm to the touch. This fish will cook quickly, probably 3-6 minutes depending on the temperature of your oven and the thickness of your portions. When done to your liking, remove the fish from the pan to rest.

To serve the dish, place a pile of couscous in the middle of a plate. shingle some heirloom tomato slices along one side. Place the fish, seared side up, on top of the couscous. Top with some of the roasted beans and tear a few basil leaves over the plate with your fingers. Drizzle the beans and tomatoes with some olive oil, and you’re good to go.

I recently came across a white wine variety that was new to me, called Müller-Thurgau, which would pair perfectly with this dish. The particular Thurgau I tasted was from northern Italy, but the grape is also grown in Austria, Germany, Hungary and elsewhere. This crisp, mineral-laden relative of riesling would be a great complement to both the tomatoes and beans in this dish.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Roasted Stone Fruit With Oat Streusel

streusel1

 

I can’t speak for the rest of the country, but this summer of 2013 is an amazing season for fruit. It started with the strawberries and cherries in the early part of the season, and it has continued on with the myriad varieties of stone fruit now available from local farmers. White and yellow peaches, apricots, nectarines, plums – they’re all unbelievably sweet and juicy. Use this recipe to take advantage of the bounty. (Plus, it’s really easy to remember, so you can break it out any time at a moment’s notice!)

100 g all-purpose flour
100 g rolled oats
100 g brown sugar
zest of 2 lemons
1/2 tsp salt
100 g butter, cubed
3 lbs various stone fruit – I used all of the above
1/2 C sugar, or to taste
your favorite vanilla ice cream

Combine the flour, oats, brown sugar, zest and salt in the bowl of a mixer. Mix well. Using the paddle attachment, cut in the butter until the mixture forms pea-sized chunks. Cover and refrigerate.

Meanwhile, halve the stone fruit and remove their pits. Place them in a wood-oven-safe baking dish. Sprinkle with the sugar to taste – if your fruit is super-delicious you may not need any; if it’s a little under-ripe you may need a bit more. Crumble the streusel topping over the fruit.

Cover with foil and bake in your wood oven for 10-15 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for another 15-20 minutes, or until the streusel is browned and the fruit is soft. Remove from the oven, allow to cool slightly to avoid scorched tongues, and serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 3.3/5 (6 votes cast)

Corn Tartine With Chevre and Rocket

tartineHurray! Fresh local corn is here for the season. Let’s celebrate with some easy, delicious corn tartines. Tartine is just a fancy word for a piece of bread with a bunch of stuff on it, aka an open-faced sandwich. It is a great oven application for a quick meal, so take this recipe as a guide and let your imagination go.

3 ears local sweet corn
3 radishes
1 jalapeno pepper
1 fresno pepper
8 oz rocket (arugula)
1/4 C fresh parsley, chopped
4 oz chevre
4 thick slices crusty bread
1/4 C extra virgin olive oil, or as needed
1 clove garlic, peeled
juice of 1 lemon
salt and black pepper, to taste

Soak the ears of corn, unshucked, in cool water for half an hour. Remove and place directly in a medium-hot wood oven. Put the ears on the coals, in the fire, wherever, as long as you’re watchful. Rotate frequently. When the husks are charred on the outside, remove from the oven and allow to cool. Shuck the corn and cut the kernels off the cobs.

Shave the radishes into thin rounds with a mandolin or sharp knife. Remove the seeds from the peppers and chop finely. In a bowl, combine the corn, radishes, peppers, rocket and parsley. (I like the pungent taste of big, mature rocket arugula here, but if all you can find is baby arugula, by all means use that.) Season well with salt and pepper and drizzle generously with olive oil. Toss well to combine and set aside.

Brush your bread with a thin coat of olive oil on both sides. Place on a sheet tray or roasting pan and place in your wood oven. Toast until golden, 2-5 minutes depending on how hot your oven is, turning once.

Remove the bread from the oven. Rub the clove of garlic thoroughly over the surface of the bread. (If your bread is too delicate for this operation, you’re using the wrong kind of bread!) Spread some chevre over each slice. Top with a pile of the corn mixture. Place in the oven and allow to roast just until the top of each pile begins to char and the cheese gets melty, about 3-6 minutes.

Remove from the oven and squeeze some lemon juice over the top of each tartine. Serve warm with an IPA alongside and you’re ready to appreciate summer’s bounty.

 

 

 

 

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 3.2/5 (5 votes cast)

Juicy Lucy Burgers

juicy1 juicy2

 

 

Claims to the origination of the Juicy Lucy are hotly debated, but we do know the first versions emerged from Minneapolis, Minnesota, and spread around the country from there. And anyway, who really cares? It’s a burger with gooey delicious cheese in the middle. That’s what really matters. I made two versions for this recipe, one plain-old cheese-filled patty, and one with the addition of pickled hot peppers. Let your imagination run wild. Just remember that, as with topping a pizza, moderation in stuffing a patty is key, or you’ll never get the burger to hold together.

24 oz your preferred ground beef
6 oz colby cheese, or whatever you decide to use
1 oz pickled hot peppers, or make your own (see below)
4 hamburger buns
lettuce, tomato, red onion, mayo, mustard – you know the drill
salt and black pepper, to taste

Divide the ground beef into four 6-ounce portions. Then divide each portion into two balls, about two-thirds to one-third by weight. To form the patties, it helps to have a ring mold somewhere around 4 inches in diameter. You can also use a large cookie cutter, or even the lid to a sour cream container in a pinch.

Pat the larger portion of the patty out into a flat disk the diameter of your mold and place it inside. Form a lip around the edge so that you have a meat crater. Place 1.5 ounces of shredded cheese inside the crater. Add a scattering of peppers if you desire.

(If you want to make your own, it’s really easy. Bring to a boil 1 cup of white wine vinegar, 2 cups of water, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1/3 cup of sugar and a clove of garlic. While you’re doing that, slice your preferred hot peppers into thin rounds. When the brine boils, pour it over the peppers. Cover with plastic and let sit for at least 15 minutes. That’s it.)

Pat out the smaller portion of meat into a flat patty large enough to cover the crater. Place it on top of the cheese. Using your fingertips, poke down around the outside of the patty to crimp the two sides together. Remove the mold and check the patty for holes. If you find any, pinch them together the best you can. Repeat with the other three burgers.

Refrigerate well. When you’re ready to cook, season with salt and pepper. Preheat a cast iron pan or your favorite burger cooking implement in your wood oven. Cook the burgers until they’re warm inside. Remove, put on a bun, top as you see fit, eat, and be proud of America.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.3/5 (7 votes cast)

Jerk-Spiced Shrimp With Slow-Cooked Collard Greens

shrimp

With summer finally upon us, this is a great light meal to coax out of your wood oven.

1 lb of your favorite shrimp, peeled and deveined (try Laughing Bird shrimp if you can get your hands on some – sustainably raised in Costa Rica, these beauties are sweet, succulent and delicious – and already cleaned and ready to go!)
5 green onions or scallions
2 serrano chiles, or habaneros if you like it hot
4 cloves garlic
1 piece fresh ginger the size of your thumb tip, peeled
7 allspice berries
10 black peppercorns
1 T fresh thyme
juice of 3 limes
1 C + 2 T vegetable oil
1/2 yellow onion, sliced
1 lb collard greens
1/4 C apple cider vinegar
salt and pepper, to taste

Roughly chop the green onions and chiles, removing the seeds and ribs of the peppers if you desire a less-spicy finished product. Place the green onions, chiles, 2 cloves of garlic, ginger, allspice, peppercorns, thyme and lime juice in the carafe of a blender. Season with salt. Turn on the blender and slowly pour in the 1 cup of vegetable oil. Blend until smooth. Taste and adjust the seasoning as necessary. Your jerk spice marinade will keep just fine in the refrigerator for a few days.

About 2 hours before you’re ready to cook shrimp, douse them in the marinade. Mix to coat on all sides. Set aside in the refrigerator.

While the shrimp are marinating, cook your collards. You are going to want a low- to medium-hot wood oven for this. Remove all the stems from the collards and discard. Roughly chop the leaves. Preheat a high-sided roasting pan or pot as big as your oven can hold. Mince the remaining 2 garlic cloves. Add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil to the pan, then add the sliced onion and garlic, season with salt and pepper, and sweat, stirring frequently, for 3 minutes. Add the collards to the pot. If your pot isn’t big enough to hold all the greens, work in batches: Add as much as the pot can hold and allow them to cook down for 2 minutes. The greens will quickly wilt and then you should be able to fit in the rest.

Add the vinegar to the greens, season with salt and pepper, and cover loosely with foil. Allow the greens to slowly cook, stirring occasionally, until dark green and tender. Depending on how hardy your collards are, this could take anywhere from 45 minutes to 2 hours. If the pot starts getting too dry and the greens are sticking to the bottom, add a little bit of water. Once the greens are done, remove from the oven and set aside.

To cook your shrimp, stoke up the oven and then preheat a large skillet. Drain any excess marinade off the shrimp. Heat the remaining oil in the pan and then add the shrimp. You will probably need to work in batches; the shrimp should be in a single layer and not too crowded in the pan. If you’re using smaller shrimp such as Laughing Bird, they will cook very quickly, approximately 45 seconds to 1 minute. Shake the pan once or twice and you’re done. For large shrimp, cook on one side until the flesh has turned opaque two-thirds of the way up the side. Turn over and cook on the other side until done.

Serve the shrimp on a bed of warm collards. Now, this is delicious just as it is. But if you have some leftover pickled peppers from making trout with crispy rice cakes, and you throw those on top, and if you’ve got some grits laying around, or maybe some leftover white rice from ordering Thai the night before, and you serve that alongside, you’ve got yourself quite a meal. Just sayin’.

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Seared Rainbow Trout With Crispy Rice Cake, Pickled Peppers and Roasted Lettuce


trout trout_pan

 

I love the delicate flavor and crispy skin of rainbow trout. Here in Chicago we are lucky enough to have an amazing sustainable trout farm, Rushing Waters, just a couple hours away, across the border in Wisconsin. If you’re not so lucky, substitute any freshwater fish you can get your hands on – or order from Rushing Waters online; they will ship to you overnight.

4 rainbow trout fillets, or other fish
2 bell peppers, whatever color you prefer
1 poblano pepper
5 C water
1 C champagne or white wine vinegar
1/3 C sugar
1 T salt
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 T pickling spice or a mixture of whatever you have on hand – coriander seeds, peppercorns, mustard seeds, fennel seeds, bay leaves, thyme sprigs, etc.
1 C long grain basmati rice
1/4 C rice flour
1 head romaine lettuce
5 fresh basil leaves, torn into pieces
2 T vegetable oil, or as needed
salt and black pepper to taste

First, pickle the peppers. Place the whole peppers on the floor of your wood oven and allow to roast, turning occasionally, until soft and charred on all sides. Remove to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and allow the peppers to steam for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a small pot combine 2 cups of the water with the vinegar, sugar, 1 tablespoon of salt, garlic and pickling spices. You can just throw the garlic and spices in, but if you want to skip the step of having to pick them out of your peppers, tie them up in a small square of cheesecloth first and then add them to the brine. The fancy French cooking term for this is a sachet. Bring this mixture to a boil.

Once the peppers are steamed, use a kitchen towel to rub off the peppers’ charred skin and discard. Cut out the stems and seeds and slice the flesh of the peppers into thin strips. Put the peppers back into the bowl and pour the boiling pickle brine over them. Set aside and allow the peppers to marinate for at least 1 hour; they’ll only get better with age.

While the peppers are pickling, cook your rice. Actually, overcook your rice (slightly). Combine the rice with the remaining 3 cups of water and season with salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook until all the water is absorbed. Turn off the heat, cover the pot and allow the rice to steam itself for an additional 3 minutes after the water is gone. It should be soft and sticky but not a pot of mush. Allow the rice to cool to room temperature, then stir in the rice flour and season to taste with salt and pepper. Form the rice into flat, round cakes about 1/2 an inch thick and two inches in diameter. Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a nonstick skillet and pan fry the rice cakes until golden and crispy on both sides.

Cut the lettuce into quarters through the core so that the leaves stay together, coat lightly with oil and season with salt and pepper. Place in a roasting pan and cook in your wood oven until wilted and beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove from the oven, cut into strips crosswise and discard the core.

Preheat a large saute pan in your wood oven with the remaining oil. Season the fish with salt only. Once the oil has just begun to smoke, add the fish, skin side down, to the pan and roast in your wood oven. Rainbow trout is so thin that the fish should cook through completely without ever being turned. This should only take 3-5 minutes, depending on the temperature of your oven.

Place the rice cakes and roasted lettuce onto a serving platter. Remove the fish from the pan and place the fillets, skin side up, on top of the rice cakes. Toss the drained peppers and basil together and spoon over the fish.

Eat. Savor. Go back for seconds.

 

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Braised Chicken With Bacon, Fingerling Potatoes and Dried Fruit

braised_chix
This dish was inspired by a random flip through one of the many cookbooks that line a high shelf just outside the kitchen at the restaurant where I work. The (old) book was a survey of regional French cooking, and one of the recipes I stumbled upon was for a dish that combined potatoes, bacon and dried fruit into a kind of gratin or casserole. I decided to adapt those flavors into a rich, satisfying braise that makes for a great unfussy meal.

1 roaster chicken, broken down into 8 pieces
1 T vegetable oil
8 oz slab bacon, cut into lardons
1/2 yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 C dry white wine
3 C good-quality chicken stock, or make your own (instructions follow)
1 1/2 lbs fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise
1/2 C dried prunes, roughly chopped
1/2 C dried apricots, roughly chopped
1 T dijon mustard
1 T unsalted butter
2 T fresh chopped parsley
salt and black pepper, to taste

First off, if you want your dish to have that extra little nudge of flavor that will  have people wondering what exactly you did to make it so delicious, make your own chicken stock using the castoffs from butchering your whole chicken. It couldn’t be easier: Throw the chicken back, neck and any trim onto a roasting tray with 2 small sliced carrots, 2 sliced ribs of celery and 1 sliced onion. Roast in a hot oven until the bones are well browned and the vegetables have caramelized. Place in a pot, being sure to scrape in all the brown bits from tray, and add 5 cups of water, a few peppercorns, a bay leaf, a sprig of thyme and any stems you have from the parsley in this recipe. Bring to a boil and allow to simmer for a couple hours. Strain and voilà – better chicken stock than you can ever get in a store. And even if you don’t have time to make the stock before you make this dish, use the bones to make it anyway, freeze it, and you’ll have it for next time.

In a medium-warm wood oven, heat a roasting pan large enough to hold all the chicken. Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper. Add the vegetable oil to the pan and then add the chicken pieces, skin side down. Brown the chicken until golden, then flip over and do the same on the other side. Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside.

Add the bacon lardons to the pan and slowly render until the bacon is browned and crispy. If the bacon has given off a lot of fat, drain off the excess, leaving about 1 tablespoon in the pan. Add the sliced onion to the pan, season with salt and pepper, and sweat, stirring often, until the onions are soft, about 6 minutes. Add the white wine and allow it to reduce by three-quarters.

Once the wine is reduced, add the chicken stock, potatoes, dried fruit and mustard to the pan. Bring to a simmer. Taste the liquid for seasoning and adjust as necessary. Nestle the chicken pieces back into the pan skin side up. Cover the pan with foil and cook for 15 minutes. You want the liquid in the pan to be just simmering. If it is boiling hard, your oven is too hot and your chicken is going to be dry. Try putting the pan on top of a rack so that it’s not in direct contact with the oven floor.

After 15 minutes, remove the foil and check the potatoes for doneness. If they are starting to get tender, remove the foil and allow the braise to cook for another 10-15 minutes, until the potatoes are completely soft. Otherwise, put the foil back on and cook, covered, for another 10 minutes before removing the foil.

When your potatoes and chicken are both tender, remove the pan from the oven. If your braise has a lot of fat floating on the top, use a spoon or small ladle to skim off the excess and discard. Remove the chicken from the pan and stir in the butter and parsley. Put the chicken back, adjust the seasoning, and you’re good to go. Serve over rice or noodles if you wish, or just enjoy your savory-sweet-smoky concoction as is with a nice saison-style beer or grüner veltliner near at hand.

 

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.0/5 (9 votes cast)

Sunchoke Homefries With Chimichurri

sunchokes

Once a restaurant-only vegetable, sunchokes are now becoming more widely available. Sunchokes are the root of a variety of sunflower, and have a nutty, sweet flavor. They can be eaten raw, in which case they are crunchy and mild, or cooked, which renders them unctuous and almost meaty. This is a simple side dish preparation for this delicious tuber, but you could also try using them in place of potatoes at your next meal.

1 lb sunchokes, scrubbed well to remove any dirt in the crevices
3 cloves garlic, peeled
1 C fresh parsley
2 T fresh oregano
1 C fresh cilantro
1/4 C red wine vinegar
1/4 tsp cumin seeds, toasted and ground
1 pinch chili flakes
1/2 C extra virgin olive oil
rice flour, as needed
1/2 C vegetable oil, or as needed, for frying
salt and pepper, to taste

Place the sunchokes in a roasting pan, season with salt and pepper, cover with foil, and place in your wood oven to cook. Allow the sunchokes to roast until soft, 35 minutes to 1 hour depending on the temperature of your oven. When the sunchokes are done, remove the foil and allow them to cool.

While the sunchokes are roasting, make your chimichurri. Place the garlic, parsley, oregano, cilantro, vinegar, cumin, chili flake and salt and pepper to taste in the bowl of a food processor. Puree. With the motor still running, slowly pour in the olive oil. Taste and adjust the seasoning as necessary. The chimichurri can also be made several hours ahead to give the flavors time to meld.

When the sunchokes are cool enough to handle, use the bottom of a small pot to squash each one into a flat disk. They will be delicate and some will fall apart – that’s ok. Heat 1/4 cup of the vegetable oil in a large skillet in your wood oven. Dredge the sunchokes in the rice flour and fry them in the oil in batches, turning once. Add more oil to the pan as necessary. Remove the sunchokes to a kitchen towel to drain and season with salt and pepper.

When the sunchokes are all fried and crispy, arrange on a serving vessel and drizzle with the chimichurri. Enjoy your new favorite tuber!

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Brussels Sprouts With Oven Roasted Meyer Lemons

brusselsBrussels sprouts and citrus are a great combination, and Meyer lemons are one of the true treasures of the heirloom citrus season. These extremely fragrant, sweet-sour little devils are a marvel of the citrus family, best enjoyed whole: zest, pith, flesh, juice and all. This extremely simple dish is not really even a recipe, just a perfect, delicious pairing that everyone should enjoy while Meyers are around.

2 Meyer lemons
1 tsp plus 1 T vegetable oil
1 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
salt and black pepper, to taste

Cut the lemons in quarters lengthwise. Remove any seeds. Cut each wedge into quarter-inch thick chunks. Heat a large skillet in a hot wood oven. Add 1 tsp vegetable oil. When just beginning to smoke, add the Meyer lemon chunks. Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring often, until the lemons have softened slightly and taken on some char, 1-2 minutes. Remove from the pan and set aside.

Wipe out your skillet and reheat. Add the remaining vegetable oil and the Brussels sprouts. Season with salt and pepper and roast, stirring occasionally, until the sprouts have caramelized and become tender, about 10 minutes. If the sprouts are getting too dark without softening, add 1/4 cup of water to the pan and allow it to cook off. Once the sprouts are cooked, stir in the roasted lemons and cook for 1 minute more.

Remove from the oven and serve as a side dish for a roast chicken, or underneath a nicely seared fillet of fish.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (6 votes cast)