Forno Bravo Community Cookbook

Quick Breakfast Pizza From Brad English, Pizza Quest

Via Brad English and Pizza Quest > http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/471-another-breakfast-pizza.html

A Quick Breakfast Pizza

- Pizza Dough
- Peter’s Herb Oil
- Grated Aged White Cheddar
- Canadian Bacon
- Sliced Red Onion
- Salt Packed Capers to finish

Getting things done:

Pre-heat the oven to 550 and before you start cooking the pizza, change it to convection bake. [Or get your wood-fired oven ready.]
Spread out the dough and layer with the herb oil, cheese and top with the Canadian Bacon and sliced onion.

While the pizza is cooking, rinse off some of the capers and chop them up. When the pizza comes out of the oven, sprinkle the capers over the pizza.

Slice and serve!

This pizza was surprisingly good. I say “surprisingly” because I just used what was in my fridge that seemed like they would taste good and satisfy my breakfast quest that morning and I was happily surprised! Had my wife made sure there was an egg in the house, this would have been a great addition to this pizza! *Insert smile here :)!!! Add that to your list if you make this one.

The ham and the cheese both had some deeper flavors. The richness of the cheddar pulled out the smokiness in this otherwise simple ham. The salty briny capers were also a terrific accent that brought a lighter brighter note to the taste profile!

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Rating: 3.7/5 (9 votes cast)

Crushed Tomato Pizza Sauce by Peter Reinhart

Via Pizza Quest/Peter Reinhart > http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/102-all-purpose-pizza-sauce.html

Makes Enough for 4 to 6 Pizzas

1 can (28 ounces) crushed or ground tomatoes
1 teaspoon salt (or to taste, start with ½ teaspoon and then adjust as needed)
1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried basil (optional) (or 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil)
1 teaspoon dried oregano (optional) (or 1 tablespoon minced fresh oregano)
1 tablespoon granulated garlic powder (sandy, not the fine powder)
(or 5 cloves of fresh garlic, minced or crushed)
1 to 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar, or lemon juice, or a combination of both (optional–some brands are more acidic than others, but I find that most benefit from at least 1 tablespoon)

Stir all the ingredients together, adding the salt gradually, to taste. (The basil and oregano are optional. I use both because I find most of my friends associate the flavors with childhood memories, but in an authentic Napoletana marinara pizza, made with true San Marzano sauce, you would use only oregano, and not in the sauce but as a garnish after the bake. The flavors of the herbs and garlic will intensify when the pizza is baked, so resist the urge to increase the amount).

Do not cook this sauce–the tomatoes are already cooked when they go in the can and they will cook again on the pizza (of course, if using this over spaghetti or other pasta, in other words, if it won’t be cooked again in the oven, then you can heat it up in a pan). This sauce will keep for 1 week in the refrigerator.

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Rating: 2.9/5 (32 votes cast)

Stuffed Peppers With Feta, Pecans and Cherry Tomatoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our dry, hot summer here in the Midwest produced a bumper crop of peppers of all shapes and sizes. You couldn’t swing Wilbur Scoville around at my farmers market without knocking over an overflowing bin of banana peppers or scattering a pile melrose peppers across the grass. This recipe is a simple late-summer side dish I concocted to make use of the bounty. I used round of Hungary peppers here, which look sort of like small, squat, deeply ridged red bell peppers. They have a deep, sweet flavor, like red bell pepper concentrated. If you can’t find them, substitute pimento peppers or small red bell peppers – but you will probably need more stuffing to fill them.

7 round of Hungary peppers, or small red bell peppers
1/2 C pecans
6 oz feta cheese, preferably goats’ milk
1 C quartered cherry tomatoes
1 T fresh chopped parsley
1 T olive oil
salt and black pepper to taste

Cut the tops off the peppers as if you’re carving a pumpkin. Use your fingers or a spoon to remove the seeds and ribs from inside the peppers.

While you are cleaning the peppers, place your pecans in a dry skillet and toast in your wood oven, tossing occasionally, until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Remove and allow to cool. Break the feta into small chunks and place in a bowl. Add the cherry tomatoes, parsley and olive oil. Roughly chop the pecans and add them to the mixture. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir well to combine.

Stuff the mixture into the cavities of the peppers up to the top. Transfer your peppers to a baking dish and cover tightly with foil. Bake in your wood oven until the peppers are just beginning to get tender, about 10-15 minutes depending on the temperature of your oven. Remove the foil and allow the peppers to continue cooking until the filling is bubbly and golden brown on top. Remove from the oven and serve. I really can’t think of much this wouldn’t taste good alongside, from burgers to bass, so go ahead and make some the next time you’ve got your oven fired up, no matter what else is on the menu.

 

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Proof the yeast

If your dough did not rise your yeast was dead. I proof the yeast by putting it in the water which should be 100 degrees F. If it is bubbly aftger about 10 minutes then it is viable. The flour has plenty of sugars that the yeast can eat….

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Perfect

I have used this recipe and wow! I have never tasted pizza crust/base so good. I use a tandoor instead of a pizza oven and the pizzas come out perfect. Thanks a billion!

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Curried Cauliflower With Chickpeas and Golden Raisins

 

This dish is actually one of my wife’s specialties. As a cook, I work in the evenings and thus miss out on dinner at a normal time, so it is a comforting feeling when I walk in the door and can tell just by the aroma of curry in the air that my late-night meal on the couch is going to be delicious and satisfying. I’ve done a little tweaking to the recipe, adapting it for the wood oven and adding golden raisins to the mix, which I think provide a nice sweet counterpoint to the earthy one-two-three punch of cauliflower, garbanzos and curry.

1 1/2 T vegetable oil
1 large head of cauliflower, cut into bite-sized florets
1 15-oz can chickpeas, drained
1/2 red onion, sliced thickly crosswise
6 cloves garlic, peeled and quartered
1/4 c golden raisins
2 tsp curry powder
salt and black pepper to taste

In your wood oven, preheat a roasting pan or skillet large enough to hold the cauliflower in one layer. Add the vegetable oil to the pan – it should be hot enough that the oil is just starting to smoke. Add the cauliflower and season with salt and pepper. Allow to roast for 2-3 minutes or until the florets have begun to caramelize on the pan side.

Add the chickpeas to the pan and stir. Roast for another 2 minutes or until the cauliflower is even more caramelized and the chickpeas have begun to blister. Add the sliced onion and garlic, stir to distribute, and cook for another 2-3 minutes, until the onion and garlic have softened and begun to frizzle around the edges and the cauliflower is al dente.

Add the raisins and curry powder and stir well to distribute. Cook for one minute more to allow the raisins to plump and the curry to toast and perfume the dish. Remove from the oven and serve. This dish would be a great accompaniment to roasted lamb, or simply serve it over cooked rice or orzo with a dab of sambal for an easy and tasty vegetarian meal.

 

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Almost Perfect

I’ve used this recipe many times and it makes a really tasty and fairly thin pizza base. In commercial terms, it is thicker than “thin and crispy” but thinner than “deep pan”. A bit like Dominos “classic crust” in Australia. My whole family loves it. The only thing I changed is the hydration. I’ve found 55-60% works better for me. The dough is easier to work and the crust is nice and crunchy.

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