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Soupy Cheese - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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New Forno Bravo Forum Feature

Forno Bravo Forum Community,

You will notice a new forum at the top of the main page called, "Ask Me Anything". This forum will be used for live one hour "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) sessions hosted by people who are knowledgeable in different areas pertaining to wood fired ovens. How it works:
- Each AMA will have a "sticky" thread where the community can post questions they would like answered during the live session. This will allow everyone to participate even if you can't be online for the live session. These questions will not be answered by the host until the live AMA; if you need an answer quickly, you should post it in the appropriate Forum area for the community to respond.
- Another thread will be posted for the live AMA. Registered users who are logged in during the live session can interact with the host by asking questions and receiving responses.
- The live thread will remain in the AMA forum to view after the session.

To kick off our AMA feature, we have invited author, chef and master bread maker and host of Pizza Quest, Peter Reinhart, to be our first host! Peter will be in the Forum on Monday, February 15th, from 7:00 - 8:00 pm EST. If you are unable to be online during the live session, you can post your questions in the sticky post. Peter will answer those questions during the live session on February 15th. You can view Peter's answers to your questions as well as what happened during the live session in the session thread.

We hope you enjoy this new feature! Please let us know if there is a topic that you'd like to have as an AMA and we'll look for a host!

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Soupy Cheese

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  • Soupy Cheese

    I've usually had luck with low moisture mozzarella cheese but I didn't like the rubbery texture I usually got. I recently bought some of Angelo and Franco's mozzarella (stored in liquid) and loved the flavor but when I put it on my pizza it released so much liquid that I had to drain it off before eating. Then when I grabbed a slice all the toppings would slip off and the bottom was soggy. Any ideas on how to fix this? I usually use Peter Reinhart's napolatana pizza dough and bake it in my electric oven at 550 F.

  • #2
    Re: Soupy Cheese

    Originally posted by sminttt View Post
    I've usually had luck with low moisture mozzarella cheese but I didn't like the rubbery texture I usually got. I recently bought some of Angelo and Franco's mozzarella (stored in liquid) and loved the flavor but when I put it on my pizza it released so much liquid that I had to drain it off before eating. Then when I grabbed a slice all the toppings would slip off and the bottom was soggy. Any ideas on how to fix this? I usually use Peter Reinhart's napolatana pizza dough and bake it in my electric oven at 550 F.
    I recommend making your own mozz from milk, it is quite easy and you can control the density dryness etc as you get experience.

    Chip
    Chip

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    • #3
      Re: Soupy Cheese

      When you work with fresh/non aged mozzarella (fior di latte, bufala), it's essential that you drain the water from the cheese. This can be done by breaking up the mozzarella into smaller pieces and placing it between paper towels.

      Another source for excessive water is curdling. Fresh mozzarellas aren't engineered for the longer bake times of lower temp pizzamaking. If you bake them for too long, they can curdle (grainy curds separate from the watery whey) producing a watery mess. For 550 oven bakes, stick to low moisture mozz.

      To avoid a 'rubbery' texture with low moisture mozzarella, it's essential to

      1. Start with whole milk cheese, preferably grated by hand
      2. Stretch your pizza nice and thin (so thin that you can start to see through it) so that the heat from the stone doesn't have far to travel to the cheese and can help bubble it from below. Bubbling is critical to good cheese texture. Bubble (heat from below) = good. Some browning (heat from above) is good, but you really want to maximize the heat coming from below. Too much top heat and too little bottom will dry out the top of the cheese and you won't get any bubbling at all.
      3. Don't use too much cheese. Watch your sauce/other ingredients as well.
      4. Grate your cheese and let it warm up a bit before baking.
      5. Use a good stone to maximize heat coming from below

      Lastly, if you're working with a 550 deg. oven, you don't want a 'Napoletana' recipe, nor do you want a dough with that much water. Water takes an incredibly large amount of energy to boil, so, the more water you have in your dough, the longer it takes to boil, and the longer it takes for heat/steam to reach the cheese from below.

      With the right stone, a 550 deg. oven can make phenomenal NY style pizza. You should be looking for NY style recipes- and preferably not a Reinhart recipe, since he tends to be heavyhanded with the water.

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      • #4
        Re: Soupy Cheese

        great feedback! thank you. I think I'll give that advice a try!

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