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Caputo from Forno Bravo - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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New Forno Bravo Forum Feature

Forno Bravo Forum Community,

You will notice a new forum at the top of the main page called, "Ask Me Anything". This forum will be used for live one hour "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) sessions hosted by people who are knowledgeable in different areas pertaining to wood fired ovens. How it works:
- Each AMA will have a "sticky" thread where the community can post questions they would like answered during the live session. This will allow everyone to participate even if you can't be online for the live session. These questions will not be answered by the host until the live AMA; if you need an answer quickly, you should post it in the appropriate Forum area for the community to respond.
- Another thread will be posted for the live AMA. Registered users who are logged in during the live session can interact with the host by asking questions and receiving responses.
- The live thread will remain in the AMA forum to view after the session.

To kick off our AMA feature, we have invited author, chef and master bread maker and host of Pizza Quest, Peter Reinhart, to be our first host! Peter will be in the Forum on Monday, February 15th, from 7:00 - 8:00 pm EST. If you are unable to be online during the live session, you can post your questions in the sticky post. Peter will answer those questions during the live session on February 15th. You can view Peter's answers to your questions as well as what happened during the live session in the session thread.

We hope you enjoy this new feature! Please let us know if there is a topic that you'd like to have as an AMA and we'll look for a host!

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Caputo from Forno Bravo

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  • Caputo from Forno Bravo

    After making a lot of phone calls, I am happy to say that Forno Bravo is now able to sell Caputo flour, San Marzano tomatoes and other imported Italian ingredients through Forno Bravo.com. We are just getting started with this, but I wanted to post it in the user group first. We can now get 2.2lb bags of Caputo pizza flour (wrapped in packs of 5), along with the 55lb (25kg) bags. We will ship Fed Ex ground, and will only use shipping to cover our real costs.

    The flour is $17.50 for a 5 pack, and $42 for the 55lb bag. Shipping depends on distance and weight, so we put a zone chart on the web site. The flour isn't inexpensive, but after all the care that went into your oven, you might think it is worth it. If you want to try it, buy a 5-pack and see if you like it. I think the difference is very noticeable, and worth the extra expense.

    Drop me an email if you want to give it a try. Also, I know there are other user groups that talk about pizza and Italian cooking, so if you are a member of another group, you might want to put the word out where folks can get the flour.

    We aren't going to put the kids through college selling flour, but I think there are enough of us out there who want to use the real thing that it should be fun.

    The food store is at:

    http://fornobravo.com/pizza-ingredients/index.html

    James
    Last edited by james; 10-04-2005, 08:12 AM.
    Pizza Ovens
    Outdoor Fireplaces

  • #2
    James,

    Do you have availability to San Marzano seeds? There is nothing better than using vine ripened tomatoes from your own garden.

    Bob C
    Great pizza, a cold beer,a great cigar and great friends...my idea of a great time

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    • #3
      Bob,

      Do you know how to harvest said seeds? I have a San Marzano producing right now in my yard!

      Not much fruit left though.

      One of our plans for the oven is to have a weekend where we:

      1) make sauce from our own tomatoes..

      2) make our own mozzarella (only takes about 30 minutes!)

      3) make pizza dough using the leftover whey from the mozzarella (makes an amazing pizza dough)

      4) make some pizza using just those ingredients and some herbs from our garden (oregano, sage, etc) and perhaps some homemade chevre or something of the sort...

      The only thing more totally back to nature would be if we were dairying our own milk, but darn, we love this stuff!
      --
      Tarik

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      • #4
        Tarik,

        what I have done in the past with good results is very simple...cut up a tomato...take out the seeds and lightly rinse them...let them dry on a paper towel...once dry (completely dry) place in an envelope and store in a dark dry place...oh, don't forget to label the envelope...I cant tell you how many chili plants I've had in my tomato row.

        Bob
        Great pizza, a cold beer,a great cigar and great friends...my idea of a great time

        Comment


        • #5
          I can't help with the seeds, but I think seed sharing, and planting heirloom fruit and vegetables not only tastes good, they're important for diversity.

          Tarik, we joke when we are eating out of our vegetable garden and using our oven that all we need for sustanence is a water buffalo. But where would it sleep???

          James
          Pizza Ovens
          Outdoor Fireplaces

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          • #6
            Originally posted by james
            I can't help with the seeds, but I think seed sharing, and planting heirloom fruit and vegetables not only tastes good, they're important for diversity.

            Tarik, we joke when we are eating out of our vegetable garden and using our oven that all we need for sustanence is a water buffalo. But where would it sleep???
            I keep looking in my back yard and thinking.. there's enough room for a little corral out there.... maybe some goats.. some sheep...

            With respect to seeds.. we actually purchase our heirlooms from a local grower who starts about 100+ varietals every spring and replaces any plants that die. What I'm learning is that even in summer, it gets a little too cold at night for really good tomato growth in our neighborhood (just 15 minutes down the road it stays warm enough, the dangers of living in the mountains), so I'm going to have to rig up some mini-greenhouses or some such.
            --
            Tarik

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            • #7
              to save tomato seeds:

              just crush the fruit to a pulp, rinse through a metal strainer until you are left with only the seeds, and then dry and store tham as Bob mentioned.

              for a great variety of heirloom tomato strains, check out: http://www.territorial-seed.com/stores/1/directory.cfm
              -Paul
              overdo it or don't do it at all!

              My 2005 pompeii build

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