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Dome Installation Video - Casa / Premio / Modena

Hello,

For many of you who bought a modular oven, you may have asked how we put the domes together when we build them. For those of you considering one of our ovens, we shot a video to make your install easier.

Check it out on our You Tube Channel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7q7...jSniYogfUra06Q

If the link doesn't work, simply go to You Tube and type Forno Bravo Channel. The video title is How to Set your Forno Bravo Oven Dome Pieces.

Thanks for participating in our Forum. We will have more video content available soon.
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The Right Tool for the Job

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  • The Right Tool for the Job

    This will probably get me into trouble here, but anyway…….

    Why does everyone using a wet saw to cut bricks?

    I went to HD last nite and an entry-level wet saw (7-inch blade) was ~$200, but it wont cut through a fire brick with one cut. The good wet saws (10-inch blade) start around $600. I though about it for a few minutes and ended up getting a 14-inch Chop Saw for $179 and a couple of mortar/cement blades for $6.29 each. After I got it home, I cut all of the bricks for my 42” oven floor in less than an hour. Works like a champ. Plus I can cut paver blocks and landscape timbers with one cut.

    Wet saws are for tile. Chop saws are for brick.

  • #2
    Re: The Right Tool for the Job

    Always protect your lungs when dry cutting. That dust is no good for you.
    My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

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    • #3
      Re: The Right Tool for the Job

      Makes perfect sense to me. Tiles are one thing. I use an old dedicated circular saw just for cutting bricks and concrete blocks. On occasion I'll install a masonry wheel on my larger compound miter saw and use it to cut bricks.
      Go to any construction site. Building blocks and bricks are dry cut.
      George

      My 34" WFO build

      Weber 22-OTG / Ugly Drum Smoker / 34" WFO

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Right Tool for the Job

        I have to side with the wet saw. My backyard, front yard, or even my garage are not a construction site (for the most part); so the huge clouds of dust from dry cutting are a big deal (to me). Not to mention the respiratory issues.....this dust WILL penetrate anything short of a fine particulate respirator.
        All that said, I already owned a wet saw as I have done a lot of tiling. Cutting firebrick finally did in my MK so I upgraded to the 10" Harbor Freight...as I've stated before, I am not a fan of cheap Chinese tools, but this is the best $200 tool money can buy. Very surprising. Unless you are a tiler by trade, no need to spend $600+ on a tile saw. I've since done a granite tile and 2 porceline tile jobs and no issues with the saw. Hell, I'm still using the original $30 blade I bought with the saw.

        Please, just buy a good respirator if you choose to dry cut...or you may not live long enough to enjoy your hard work.

        RT

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        • #5
          Re: The Right Tool for the Job

          I used my compound mitre saw. Soaked the bricks well, and plugged a shop-vac into the back to suck up the dust. Wearing a mask is good advice.

          Then used the dust underneath the hearth. Was able to do some pretty fancy cuts to help with the dome, particularly at the entrance.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The Right Tool for the Job

            Nabber,

            Many of us have bought the 10" Harbor Freight tile & brick wet saw: 2.5 Horsepower 10" Industrial Tile/Brick Saw

            It can usually be found at local stores on sale for UNDER $200. For a cheap Chinese import, it rocks. I used this thing to cut all my dome refractory bricks, then all the decorative stone for my enclosure. Now, with a new diamond tile blade, I'm cutting the tile for 160 sq feet of outdoor counter top.

            With bit of careful shimming, it can cut complex compound cuts for dome bricks.

            I cut over 250 bricks for my dome, most of them had multiple, compound cuts. I can't image the dust issue I would have had without a wet saw.

            That's why we are using a wet saw to cut brick
            Ken H. - Kentucky
            42" Pompeii

            Pompeii Oven Construction Video Updated!

            Oven Thread ... Enclosure Thread
            Cost Spreadsheet ... Picasa Web Album

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            • #7
              Re: The Right Tool for the Job

              FYI

              I just saw an ad from Harbor Freight where the brick saw was on sale for $189.00 - that is less then I paid 3 years ago.

              Les...
              Last edited by Les; 07-29-2009, 05:10 PM. Reason: spelling is important
              Check out my pictures here:
              http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/les-build-4207.html

              If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.

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              • #8
                Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                Well, for $200, I might get just get that 10" wet saw for my planned WFO project.
                George

                My 34" WFO build

                Weber 22-OTG / Ugly Drum Smoker / 34" WFO

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                  You can get OSHA approved dust mask for 3 dollars. I understand the aesthetics of working without dust and the dangers of working with, but if you want performance for little capital outlay, a chop saw is a really good option.

                  If I would have found a $200 chinese wet saw in time for my project shedule, I probaly would have went for it (bad scheduling skills!).
                  Last edited by Nabber86; 07-29-2009, 06:32 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                    I'm a union sheetmetal worker on jobsites every day in Detroit and every bricky I've ever worked with makes the vast majority of their cuts on a wet saw and ALWAYS has a wet saw on site setup right next to their staging area with their mixer.

                    Originally posted by fxpose View Post
                    Makes perfect sense to me. Tiles are one thing. I use an old dedicated circular saw just for cutting bricks and concrete blocks. On occasion I'll install a masonry wheel on my larger compound miter saw and use it to cut bricks.
                    Go to any construction site. Building blocks and bricks are dry cut.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                      Originally posted by fxpose View Post
                      Go to any construction site. Building blocks and bricks are dry cut.
                      Not really true. My neighbor has a monster wet saw that will cut block. Installing pavers and BBQ island's, you will need to cut brick/stone. But.... with proper design you should never need to cut a block (other than miters)
                      Check out my pictures here:
                      http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/les-build-4207.html

                      If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.

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                      • #12
                        Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                        Oops.....you guys are right. After speaking to one of our clients who happens to be a general contractor, wet saws are generally used and in many instances, mandatory.
                        George

                        My 34" WFO build

                        Weber 22-OTG / Ugly Drum Smoker / 34" WFO

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                          It seems like the only post I ever make promotes the HF saw. Not only is it on sale, but if you register on their website they send a 20% off coupon by email now and then. I just got one today. I used the saw to cut pavers for a path and patio, and the firebrick is so much softer than pavers that it cuts almost too easily. The pavers chewed up the blade faster than the firebrick does as well. I strongly recommend hearing and eye protection. I've also had it grab a firebrick and pull it out of my hands to the back of the saw, so keep hands and fingers to the side of the blade.
                          Joe

                          Member WFOAMBA Wood Fired Oven Amatueur Masons Builders America

                          My thread: http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/j...oven-8181.html

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                          • #14
                            Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                            The main reason other than the mess and respiratory concerns is the damage to the saw. The dust is so fine it will damage a normal saw if it gets into the motor or any unsealed bearings. If that's not a concern than there isn't a difference.
                            Dave, Rosemary, Nick, Julia, and Nate

                            Build Thread

                            http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f21/...oven-7356.html

                            Photos

                            http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/phot...dex.php?u=8499

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                            • #15
                              Re: The Right Tool for the Job

                              I rented a water bath saw for the bulk cutting into halfs, thirds etc. Cut them all in an hour.

                              For the beveling cuts as you proceed up the dome, a chop saw will work OK. And you can use it for other tasks. To cut down on dust and to extend the life of the cutting blade, soak the bricks in a pail of water for 1/2 hour or so or until they stop bubbling.
                              Last edited by Neil2; 08-01-2009, 12:32 PM.

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