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Insulated Hearth - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Photo Galleries are back! Instructions below.

Dear forum users,
Thank you for your patience with the Photo galleries. We've got your galleries online!
We have finished writing a custom script to migrate the PhotoPlog to vBulletin5’s albums.

Unfortunately V-Bulletin killed the "Photoplogs" in their software upgrade which was unforeseen and we're the first development group to have written a script for getting the galleries back... that said, it took some time to reverse engineer the code and get the albums to move over seamlessly!

Forum users will be able to access their “PhotoPlog” images through their user profile page by clicking on the “Media” tab.
They will also be able to browse other albums by going to the albums page. (On the forum site, there is a link in the black bar beside “Forums” to the albums.)

In order for users to create an album please follow the steps below.
1) Go to user profile page and click “Media”
2) Click Add Photos
3) Enter Photo Gallery Title in the first field
4) Click Upload or Select from Photo Album to add photos
5) Click Post
6) Once posted, the album will be created as a “Topic” on the albums page for the public to see. The topic title will be the “Photo Gallery Title” they created before uploading their photos.


To create this migration path we used vBulletin5’s default album structure. Unfortunately, it won’t work like the “PhotoPlog” but is an album/gallery component on the forum now.
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Insulated Hearth

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  • Insulated Hearth

    I'm getting ready to pour the insulated hearth for the Premio 120 Modular Oven. This is turning into a real scavenger hunt. I notice that the insulated hearth is poured using Calcium Aluminate Cenent to create refractoty concrete. Altrnatively regular concrete. Will the regular concrete hold up? Or should I go the distance and use the Refractory Concrete?

    TIA

    Howie

  • #2
    Hi Howie,

    I think you really only need Calcium Aluminate concrete in a commercial oven that is fired 24-hours a day. A large percentage of home ovens are installed using standard concrete (in fact there are installation guides from producers that recommend a simple, standard concrete hearth without any insulation). If you have an easy, local source and it isn't expensive, you could go for the calcium aluminate, as it will last longer (probably long after we are all gone) and perhaps heat up a little faster, but the difference is not worth a lot of effort.

    James
    Pizza Ovens
    Outdoor Fireplaces

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    • #3
      Would this be true for the Pompeii as well? I do have an inexpensive and easy source of this concrete (and mortar) and was already planning on purchasing it for the oven build.

      It never occurred to me to use it in pouring the hearth. I'm planning on trying to do the island hearth, BTW, which seems slightly challenging since I have to pour the island while the perlite insulative layer is still wet, which means removing the island forms. Time will be important.

      Tarik
      --
      Tarik

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      • #4
        if you are already pouring an adequate support layer as described in the other thread about the island hearth, i believe you could just make a circular form out of sheet metal to separate the thermal concrete from the surrounding perlite layer, and just leave the metal form in the concrete. i would set in a half inch or so beneath the surface.
        -paul
        overdo it or don't do it at all!

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        • #5
          Logical... dunno why I didn't think of it! :-)

          I was not planning on pouring an extra support layer.

          The back 2/3's of the oven hearth will be supported by sitting on a 6+ inch poured concrete foundation poured behind a 3 foot high, 6-7 inch thick concrete retaining wall.

          Only the front 32 inches will be supported by concrete blocks as in the normal design. I am reasonably confident that I don't need the concrete layer under the insulation layer for this as this would only be supporting the throat of the oven.

          Let me know if you think otherwise.

          Tarik
          --
          Tarik

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aikitarik
            Logical... dunno why I didn't think of it! :-)

            How do you think I feel?

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