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Curing - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Photo Galleries are back! Instructions below.

Dear forum users,
Thank you for your patience with the Photo galleries. We've got your galleries online!
We have finished writing a custom script to migrate the PhotoPlog to vBulletin5’s albums.

Unfortunately V-Bulletin killed the "Photoplogs" in their software upgrade which was unforeseen and we're the first development group to have written a script for getting the galleries back... that said, it took some time to reverse engineer the code and get the albums to move over seamlessly!

Forum users will be able to access their “PhotoPlog” images through their user profile page by clicking on the “Media” tab.
They will also be able to browse other albums by going to the albums page. (On the forum site, there is a link in the black bar beside “Forums” to the albums.)

In order for users to create an album please follow the steps below.
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To create this migration path we used vBulletin5’s default album structure. Unfortunately, it won’t work like the “PhotoPlog” but is an album/gallery component on the forum now.
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Curing

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  • Curing

    Wow my head is hurting from reading all the opinions on curing. Keep it wet? What's that all about? I thought the whole idea was to get the moisture out. Confusing.
    Anyway I'm about to install my Casa 90 and need to know:
    1. Can I cure before applying the insulation blanket?
    2. Should I cover it if it rains?
    3. How will I know it is cured sufficiently?
    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Curing

    Originally posted by PlanoPhil View Post
    Wow my head is hurting from reading all the opinions on curing. Keep it wet? What's that all about? I thought the whole idea was to get the moisture out. Confusing.
    Anyway I'm about to install my Casa 90 and need to know:
    Keeping it wet is a urban myth about letting the mortar dry slowly so it hardens properly without cracking.
    Ive laid bricks on 40c days and honestly havent seen any cracking or weak joints.

    They pour large concrete slabs for houses in the heat here and they dont even crack, well, not more that you would expect.

    Originally posted by PlanoPhil View Post
    1. Can I cure before applying the insulation blanket?
    2. Should I cover it if it rains?
    3. How will I know it is cured sufficiently?


    1.
    Yes and it would dry quicker doing it that way.

    2.
    Yes, otherwise you are right back to where you started from.

    3.
    Youll know, because the fires will actually start to get hot and burn with a passion.
    The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

    My Build.

    Books.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Curing

      There is confusion about the term "curing".
      Firstly, when applied to freshly laid concrete containing Portland cement: it should be kept moist for a week. Concrete not treated this way will not achieve its max strength. This applies to anything made containing Portland cement. It is impractical in many instances to keep a slab moist for a week, so it is often not done, however the resulting strength may be down as much as 60%. Castable refractory containing calcium aluminate cement does not need this treatment. It should be covered for 24 Hrs only.
      The other type of "curing" referred to with oven construction is the elimination of water. This is a problem because steam pressure build up can cause cracking and moist insulation doesn't work too well. We should really invent another name for this process to avoid the resulting confusion.
      Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Curing

        Originally posted by david s View Post
        There is confusion about the term "curing".
        Firstly, when applied to freshly laid concrete containing Portland cement: it should be kept moist for a week. Concrete not treated this way will not achieve its max strength. This applies to anything made containing Portland cement. It is impractical in many instances to keep a slab moist for a week, so it is often not done, however the resulting strength may be down as much as 60%.
        Please tell me the AS standards this is referring to so I can reference it.

        I havent seen this anywhere in the brickwork AS or the concrete AS and I have both at hand.

        Did I miss something in the AS's ?
        Last edited by brickie in oz; 04-16-2011, 02:47 PM.
        The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

        My Build.

        Books.

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        • #5
          Re: Curing

          you need to read the info from Cement Aust. I was actually wrong about strength being down to 60% concrete air dried is actually only 40% of full compressive strength.

          http://www.concrete.net.au/publicati...f/Curing06.pdf
          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Curing

            Boats made from ferro cement are carefully cured for 28 days for the same reason. I'd hate to be in the ocean in a crumbly concrete boat. aaahh!
            Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Curing

              Sorry David but I have to laugh, theory is one thing but practice is entirely a different beast.

              Never in 30 odd years in the trade have I seen any concreter covering their slab with plastic to cure it, Ive seen slabs laid one day and the timber frame erected the next.

              Im sure the same concrete slab is still there doing what its supposed to do 20 years on.
              The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

              My Build.

              Books.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Curing

                Originally posted by david s View Post
                I'd hate to be in the ocean in a crumbly concrete boat. aaahh!
                Wouldn't it be Yarhhhhhhhh?
                The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                My Build.

                Books.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Curing

                  [QUOTE=david s;111244]There is confusion about the term "curing".
                  Firstly, when applied to freshly laid concrete containing Portland cement: it should be kept moist for a week. Concrete not treated this way will not achieve its max strength. This applies to anything made containing Portland cement. It is impractical in many instances to keep a slab moist for a week, so it is often not done, however the resulting strength may be down as much as 60%.
                  As I said, it is impractical in many instances to keep it moist. However all prestressed concrete beams, pipes etc. are manufactured in this way to gain max strength from the cement used. If possible why wouldn't you make it as strong as you can. The other alternative is to over build it and hope for the best.
                  Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Curing

                    The problem with having the mortar too hard is if there is ever any movement the bricks crack instead of the joint.
                    The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                    My Build.

                    Books.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Curing

                      yes, and this is the reason why many brick kilns have no mortar between the bricks. Same goes for our oven brick floors.
                      Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Curing

                        DavidS,

                        So is it the potential for oven movement that it is advised to minimize or eliminate inside mortar joints? I thought it was because portland cement begins to break down at 500F. There is a high percentage of builds on the FB site that have little or no exposed joints in the oven interior with 1"+ gaps on the dome exterior.

                        John

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                        • #13
                          Re: Curing

                          Yeah,
                          Because the oven is moving stresses build up and something is probably going to give. Like Brickie said you'd prefer that your mortar failed before the bricks. So the mortar should be weaker than the bricks it joins. However you don't want it too weak.
                          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Curing

                            Its far easier to repoint a few joints rather than replacing a brick.
                            The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                            My Build.

                            Books.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Curing

                              How does the homebrew recipe of 1-3-1-1 (portland, sand, lime, fireclay) work out strength-wise?

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